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The last set of carbs I pulled were on my CB900 inline 4 cylinder. These were some of the hardest carbs I have ever pulled and or worked on. Until I looked at the ones on the VN750.

It there a trick to pulling these carbs. I have to clean these carbs and need to get them off. Any help would be great.

Blessings!
Richard
 

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No tricks exactly, but there are things that will make it easier. First remove EVERYTHING that could possibly be in the way. Do not remove the throttle cables. Remove the seat, tank, steering head covers, fuel lines, the ducts between the surge tank and the carbs, then take something and tie the surge tank up tight against the frame. If you don't, it will keep falling down and you will never get the carbs off.

You leave the manifold on the front head, but you remove the rear one from the head, and it comes off with the carbs. The carbs are actually one piece. Spray WD-40 all over everything to make it slippery. The carb assembly comes out the right side with the throttle cables still attached. They actually come out fairly easily when you get them lined up right, but it has to be just right. Be patient, and keep moving them around a little, till you find the right spot. Excessive force should not be necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info. I am going to pull them Saturday to cleaned them. Hopefully I don't have to re-kit them. Are there kits available for them?

Blessings!
Richard
 

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Thanks for the info. I am going to pull them Saturday to cleaned them. Hopefully I don't have to re-kit them. Are there kits available for them?

Blessings!
Richard
Have you tried a good dose of SeaFoam? Might save you a lot of trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
When I had my CB900 Custom the Honda service center said that these old Klein carbs leaked all the time and there is nothing that could be done. I done believe that nothing is impossible.

Found Seafoam and a inline fuel filter did the trick. Later found that the Honda people wanted to sell me a new bike instead of fixing my old one, never went back to them.

I didn't know that Seafoam would clean carbs that has sat with gas in it for a while. I am going to pull the carbs and clean them then put my inline fuel filter and then do the seafoam thing for a couple of tanks. That will fix anything.

Thanks for y'alls help.
 

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You know you can add pure Sea Foam to the carbs and let it sit for a couple of days. Doesn't always work, but I'd try that before pulling those stinkin' carbs!
 

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Depending on how bad they are, filling them with Seafoam and letting them soak for a while can work. When you put the Seafoam in, try to start the bike. It probably won't run, but it should fire a few times and make some smoke. This actually uses engine vacuum to suck Seafoam up into the jets.

If you remove and separate the carbs, theyshould be re synchronized, especially if they haven't been since you got the bike. When I had my carbs off to rejet after installing an aftermarket exhaust, I synchronized them. But when I had them off again to rejet again after going back to the stock exhaust (expensive lesson learned) I just checked the throttle plates before I separated them, both were completely closed, both held WD-40, so I know one was not a tiny bit more open than the other. I just put them back that way, and it ran fine. Both throttle plates in exactly the same position is where they should be, if both cylinders are the same. But if one cylinder has less compression than the other by a noticeable amount, it will also have less vacuum, and the carbs need to be set to compensate for that. I have a Motion Pro mercury synchronizer I bought about 15 years ago, brand new, for less than half what they go for today.
 

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I'd say my bike runs just fine, however i think that my front ACCT might be loosening up so i might be taking it to the Kawi dealer later this spring/summer. Is it worth it for me to have my carbs synched then? synching the carbs just makes sure that both cylinders are working equally hard, right?
 

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It there a trick to pulling these carbs. I have to clean these carbs and need to get them off. Any help would be great.

Blessings!
Richard
The folllowing is from the link below:

NOTE:
The front cylinder carb/cylinder rubber boot will REMAIN ATTACHED to the cylinder head during removal of carb assembly

Loosen the carb-side screw ONLY of the front cylinder carb/cylinder rubber boot. This rubber boot will REMAIN on cylinder!

Loosen the cylinder-side screw ONLY of the rear cylinder carb/cylinder rubber boot. This rubber boot will REMAIN on carb!

With the clamps above loosened, you can now remove the carb assembly.

Use a twisting action to remove the carbs making sure (as noted before) the rubber boot of front cylinder stays on cylinder and rubber boot of rear cylinder stays with carb.

Loosen both throttle lock nuts….turn adjuster “in” (toward handle grip) all the way
Loosen throttle cable lock nuts on carb brackets and disconnect both from throttle linkage. Note which cable goes to linkage!!

You now have the carb assembly free from the bike
 

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I'd say my bike runs just fine, however i think that my front ACCT might be loosening up so i might be taking it to the Kawi dealer later this spring/summer. Is it worth it for me to have my carbs synched then? synching the carbs just makes sure that both cylinders are working equally hard, right?
I wouldn't even mess with the ACCTs, just replace them with a set of MCCTs (they are priced about the same) and never have to worry about it again. The last set of brand new oem tensioners I got lasted less than 10,000 miles.

For what a dealer would charge you to synchronize the carbs, you can buy the tool, and do it yourself. It's easy on a twin, twice as easy as on a four cylinder. Then you will have the tool, and can check them whenever you want.

Dealers will rip you off big time for service, and while their parts prices are about the same as everywhere else (online sources) IF you buy them from the parts counter, they mark up the price if they install them. If you can buy a tensioner for $65 at the counter, a dealer will add about 20% to that, plus at least a minimum 1/2 hour labor to install it. Shop labor in my area averages $90 an hour, and that's not even for a real mechanic.


One of the neat things about this forum, is that you can find out how to do almost anything yourself. You can even get a service manual here.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
What is the steering head covers and the surge tank? Is that the tank that connects to the breathers?
 

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Steering head covers are the plastic covers in front of the tank and the surge tank is underneath the tank and is connected to the carbs and air filters
 
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