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Drive less, ride more...
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey, Gang....:D

For those a bit skittish about this mod, or for those who may be considering it, I thought I would weigh in on my experiences with the increased tire sizes (as seen below in my signature) over stock, after 500 miles of riding on the new tires.

Let me first say that, there are no clearances issues with these upgraded sizes. If you try to have someone else put these sizes on, and they suggest that there are fitment issues, take your business elsewhere!!! I see no evidence of scuffing (or nearly so) on the tires, either from the fenders--or the swingarm.

The main advantage that I've experienced thus far is increased stability. Whether it's turning tight circles in a parking lot (scraping the pegs is that much easier, now!....:p), or cruising the interstate at 70+ mph, the bike just feels more stable.

Turn-in effort, if anything more, is negligible.

As Dianna (and perhaps others) have already mentioned, the bike is running at lower rpms for a given speed (I'd say 400 rpm, or maybe a little more).

I haven't checked for improved gas mileage over the factory sizes, nor have I been in the rain with the new treads, yet. So I can't offer any feedback there.

Anyway, for those facing the need for new tires, this upgrade seems to be a no-lose option, based on what I've encountered....:smiley_th
 

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Super Moderator
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11,817 Posts
This is good to hear. I have been a proponent of the larger front for years
(the 110), and was only told that a 170 would not fit....never had the chance to check it out myself.

More rubber on the road is always a good thing,

You wouldn't happen to have a photo of the two tires next to each other for comparison would you?

KM
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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1,114 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Sorry, no photos. I never thought of before/after, especially on the bike itself....:(

BTW: Now seems to be a good time to mention something else...

(Again) for those needing new tires soon--be sure to take full advantage of the fact that our bike uses tubeless tires.

When you order your new tires, also order/purchase two or three 8-oz bottles of "Ride On" tire sealant.

This stuff works with tubed tires--but even better with tubeless tires!

After you "break in" your new tires, add "Ride On" per the instructions that come with your order. It's actually pretty easy to install...:)

And no, I'm not an employed by, or in any way affiliated with, the parent company of "Ride On" sealant....
 

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Did you have any issues getting the rear wheel back into the rear swingarm with the wider tire on it? Any notes about how you did it?
 

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I did the samething to mine last summer. The rear tire was a little hard getting in but if you let the air out of the tire it slides right in. I've got about 1,000 miles on both tires and love the way they feel.
 

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Search Goddess
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2,002 Posts
Sorry, no photos. I never thought of before/after, especially on the bike itself....:(

BTW: Now seems to be a good time to mention something else...

(Again) for those needing new tires soon--be sure to take full advantage of the fact that our bike uses tubeless tires.

When you order your new tires, also order/purchase two or three 8-oz bottles of "Ride On" tire sealant.

This stuff works with tubed tires--but even better with tubeless tires!

After you "break in" your new tires, add "Ride On" per the instructions that come with your order. It's actually pretty easy to install...:)

And no, I'm not an employed by, or in any way affiliated with, the parent company of "Ride On" sealant....
*Sniff* *muffed sob*
I'm so proud of you!
You have learned well grasshopper! :rockon:
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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1,114 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Dianna!....:D

Darrel, to answer your question: You may find that letting air out prior to mounting the tire helps; other that that, I don't remember any install complications.

For what it's worth: Metzeler fans--note that the tires that Yamaha (Star) is using for the slick new Raider....are Metzeler ME880s.
 

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San Diego Vulcan Rider
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163 Posts
The front tire sounds like a nice upgrade. My only concern about the rear is the effect on the loads placed on the splines and other drive line components. Designers are always under pressure to keep cost effectiveness and over-engineering in mind. I wonder if Kawa had listed mods that would void the warranty. Of course, that's moot with our bikes now.
 

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Undercover Sportbiker
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1,097 Posts
Also for those of you wondering - ME-880s are what OCC uses on most of their bikes (at least the ones on the show). I have them on my V-Star and I love em. If I hadn't gone with the Avon Venom-X tires, I probably would have put the MEs on my Vulcan, which is actually now **officially** my buddies Vulcan. tears, sniffles.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Bumping this back to the top.
 

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and if i remember correctly the larger front tire corrects the speedo difference.... i need atleast a new front.... maybe ill look into stepping up to the larger size for the front....
 

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I will try to get pics off the tire size diff. I have my new Metz in my basement patiently waiting. I didn't get the larger front though. ...shame,shame,shame... I had the Metz on my ninja 250 and they were grrreatt. especially in the rain, and in the rain on cement roads with those stupid grooves. they didn't track all over.
 

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I went with the 170/80 in back and stayed with the 100/90 in front. Metzeler
 

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I will do pics when I put the tires on the bike. right now its 10 degrees out. I'm not changing tires in my garage and lubing my spline, in this weather. Hopefully later this week. When I do though I will get before and after pics. I could do a pic now with the one tire off the rim, but it wouldn't look quite the same without the weight of the bike
 

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FWIW, guys, the 110/90-19 front, 170/80-15 rear combination has been working for me for well over 15,000 miles now. IIRC, it was Feb. '07 when KM commented on the Yahoo group he didn't think the 170 would clear the swingarm, but wasn't sure, so I set out to find out. It did, sooo...I done it. :D

Found out later some of the 1500A (same stock tire sizes as the 750) riders had been using the 170 for years.

Jim
 

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ExNewbie..Still Learnin'!
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256 Posts
I cant believe noone can produce pics of this tire on their bikes....:blah:
Agreed!!! :rockon: I need to replace both of mine as they are worn/old and some pics would help me determine if I want to oversize or not.

BTW, there was another thread somewhere on here asking how you can tell the age of your tires. The risk is that, even if you can not see dry rot (small cracks) on your tires, the rubber compound loses it's elasticity over time. Which means every pothole is an even bigger threat of having a blowout. Although very aggressive riders might need to change more often, a good rule to follow is think about it after three years, change them by five years. Anything over five years old is on its way out. Not worth risking your life or your significant other if you ride 2-up.

Check your newly purchased tires to make sure you haven't been stuck with stale ones. Should be within a year at most.

Found this a while back on another website somewhere, can't remember so can't properly credit, but is very helpful when looking at tires:

• How do you know how old the tires are? All tires have an industry-standard dating code stamped on them. Look for digits stamped into the mold on the rubber sidewall of the tire. The date code for tires made prior to 2000 is: "WWY", where WW is two digits denoting the week of the year, and Y is the last digit of the year. A tire produced on May 30th (the 22nd week) of 1996 would be stamped 226. (A tire produced on May 30th of 1986 would also have a code of 226, but will probably have a ton of dry rot.)
• As of 2000, the date coding system has changed a bit. All tires are still required to be stamped with a DOT number on at least one sidewall, but now there's more data. Look for a code that starts with "DOT" and has up to 12 letters and numbers. The last four numbers are the date code in the format: "WWYY", where the WW two digits denote the week of manufacture, and the YY denotes the last two digits of the year. So a date code of "DOT913ACX3C2200" would have been manufactured in the 22nd week of '00. If the three/four digit stamp you found doesn't make sense with this scheme, you're not looking at the date code stamp. Keep in mind that both tires will have this date marking (possibly/probably different), and that tires should be replaced at least every third year, or whenever they have damage that threatens their integrity. (Punctures, cuts on the sidewall, excessive wear, dry rot, etc.) Frequent tire inspection could very well save your life.
 

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Premium Member
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Looks like I've been running on great looking but pretty old tires. Front: DAWV M49187 (18th week of 1997/1987?). Rear: DAZF M2A119 (11th week of 1999/1989?). The bike is an '89 model with Dunlop Qualifiers. POs kept bike in a garage and they look good. No cracks at all.

Just got the thing running right and need to park it until I get new tires! Glad you posted. I was fixing to head out.
 
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