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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
Got them for $234.98 shipped, front and rear. Went ahead and got the 110 front. My local shop won't install tires unless you buy from them, so I'm going to do em myself. (very small "yea" from the cheering section in my head) It'l be a good opportunity to see how my splines are doing and to learn first hand why it's a good deal to pay someone $30 to change a tire! I'll have to figure out how to balance them but I'm actually looking forward to it.

I got the Metz's for way cheaper than the D404's if I had my shop put them on, and the shop doesn't sell the metz's right now. Something about direct sales and how the distributor had dropped them temporarily. Anyhow, it should be fun. Advice is WELCOME!
 

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HAWK
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2,576 Posts
The hard part will be breaking the bead on the old tires.
Do you have the tools to change the tires, they sell tire spoons which make it easer, and I would recomend getting a rim saver, keeps you from scratching the rims.
Do you have a compressor to fill them, be careful when the beed sets, can take off a finger if in the wrong place.
You can balance by puting the axel thorugh the tire and bsalancing it on 2 chairs. Spin the tire slowley and mark it where it stops. to that a couple of times and see if it stops in the same place, that is the light side of the tire.
You can put weight on a little at a time and see if it helps.
Hope this helps.
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
On most bike tires, there is a small dot of paint on one side of the sidewall.
Be sure to put that dot even with the valve stem. That should put the lightest part of the tire at the heaviest part of the rim.

With tubeless tires, it can be a little difficult to get both beads set enough to hold air for filling. If this is an issue, and you have a ratchet strap handy, put the strap around the diameter of the tire and tighten it down to aid in bead setting.
Sometimes you may need to put more air than reccomended to get the bead set. To help with this, be sure to use some type of lube while putting the tire on the rim. Murphy's Oil soap diluted with water (maybe a couple table spoons to a cup of water) works good. I've also heard of people using talcum powder, but that can end up being a bit messy. The lube can also help with removing the tire, so ya may need a couple of cups worth.

IMO, the toughest part is putting the tire on, especially the last few inches. Don't be in a hurry. Take little steps to get the tire over the rim and the job will be much easier.

Also, once the old tire is off the rim, be sure to clean around the bead area of the rim and check for any knicks or dings.

Oh yeah, be sure to check if the tire is directional and double check that you have it in the right direction.
 

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Premium Member
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I rolled my wheels with old tires into the Honda dealer with the 2 new D404's and they charged me $ 21.50 each to dismount the old, mount & balance the new ones. Decided it wasn't worth the effort to do it myself.

I only paid $ 13X.XX for the set of D404's delivered.

Jon
 

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Registered
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207 Posts
On most bike tires, there is a small dot of paint on one side of the sidewall.
Be sure to put that dot even with the valve stem. That should put the lightest part of the tire at the heaviest part of the rim.

With tubeless tires, it can be a little difficult to get both beads set enough to hold air for filling. If this is an issue, and you have a ratchet strap handy, put the strap around the diameter of the tire and tighten it down to aid in bead setting.
Sometimes you may need to put more air than reccomended to get the bead set. To help with this, be sure to use some type of lube while putting the tire on the rim. Murphy's Oil soap diluted with water (maybe a couple table spoons to a cup of water) works good. I've also heard of people using talcum powder, but that can end up being a bit messy. The lube can also help with removing the tire, so ya may need a couple of cups worth.
Thanks for the tips - I did not know that bit about the dot on the tire, and the Murphy's soap is a good trick.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the tips! Didn't know about the dot either.
Jon, my local shop won't mount tires unless you buy them there, so I thought I'd save some money and do it myself, and try the Metz's. Their price for the D404's with mounting and tax was $301. That's why I'm trying the Metzlers. And trying the mounting.:D
 

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Avid Rider
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279 Posts
You'll be happy with the Metz's fergy, I loved 'em when I went with them on my last tire change...:smiley_th
 

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Premium Member
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Thanks for the tips! Didn't know about the dot either.
Jon, my local shop won't mount tires unless you buy them there, so I thought I'd save some money and do it myself, and try the Metz's. Their price for the D404's with mounting and tax was $301. That's why I'm trying the Metzlers. And trying the mounting.:D
I look forward to a write-up on the tire change! Did you have 404's before? If so, like to hear your thoughts on the comparison between the Metz and the 404's.

Did the 404's go up in price? They are standard equipment on all new HD's (just say HD i/o Dunlop), perhaps they inflated the prices to go with the inflated prices on the HD's?

Funny, all the shops I called said they would do it even if I did not buy the tires there, just some changed MORE than others.

Jon
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
so I thought I'd save some money and do it myself,
Like I said, just take your time.
It works out ALOT better (easier) if you only manage to get 1/2 inch at a time on the rim instead of trying to get a whole lot at once.

And be careful with the tire spoons. They can slip unexpectedly and either send your knuckles into the wheel, or send the spoon flying. Not to discourage ya from trying it, just use caution.
The more times ya do it, the easier it gets.

HERE is an online article I found on tire changes.
It does say ....
This document is very large -- it's only around 64k of HTML, but it contains about 740k of inline JPEG graphics and many more as links. This will take people on dialup connections at least couple of days to download. (Sorry!)
 

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Avid Rider
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Like the new avatar, Anthony, very cool! :smiley_th
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #12
I've had 4 new tires for my riding lawnmower that I decided to put on over the weekend and dear God in heaven! I really had no idea it was going to be such a struggle. So far I've gotten three out of 4 to set a bead but no amount of gorilla like effort will make the fourth one set a bead. I've tried a ratchet strap till I was blue in the face. I just called around and found a little biker shop not far from here that will do my metzlers for $25 each so I'm going to wimp out on doing them myself. So, no photos and writeup. I don't think I have it in me, or if I did, it's gone. My legs are so sore I can't hardly stand up and that's just from lawnmower tires!:confused:
 

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Premium Member
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I've had 4 new tires for my riding lawnmower that I decided to put on over the weekend and dear God in heaven! I really had no idea it was going to be such a struggle. So far I've gotten three out of 4 to set a bead but no amount of gorilla like effort will make the fourth one set a bead. I've tried a ratchet strap till I was blue in the face. I just called around and found a little biker shop not far from here that will do my metzlers for $25 each so I'm going to wimp out on doing them myself. So, no photos and writeup. I don't think I have it in me, or if I did, it's gone. My legs are so sore I can't hardly stand up and that's just from lawnmower tires!:confused:
Money well spent, good move.

Jon
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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That's not a bad price Fergy. Probably better off that way.

If I didn't have a dirtbike, which requires at least a new rear tire about once a year, I'd probably do the same. But because of that, I've had more than a few chances to practice tire changes. (and the Harbor Freight manual tire changer helps too!!)
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #15
Got my Metzlers put on yesterday and installed the wheels last night. Geez Louize that front tire is big. It's the 110 and just barely clears my fender. Rode to work this morning and it feels nice. Still having to take it easy cause they're slick but man the front turns easy. I know the 110 isn't that much bigger than the 100 but dang it looks fat on my bike. Rear seems fatter too, but maybe its just my imagination. I had to look last night when I was getting ready to put on the rear wheel to make sure I hadn't bought the wrong rear tire. Checked my splines too while I had it off and they're looking great.
Glad to be back on my bike! I'll let you know how I like the metz's after I've broken them in.
 

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Benjammin'
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421 Posts
Please post pictures of the tires. I am really interested in seeing what the larger front tire looks like!!!
 

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I've had 4 new tires for my riding lawnmower that I decided to put on over the weekend and dear God in heaven! I really had no idea it was going to be such a struggle. So far I've gotten three out of 4 to set a bead but no amount of gorilla like effort will make the fourth one set a bead. I've tried a ratchet strap till I was blue in the face.
Try putting the wheel and tire next to a heater long enough for the tire to become pliable. Try coating the beads with soapy water. When you are trying to set the bead, use your forearm and come down hard on the tire. Sometimes it's enough to pop the tire out. You can also visit a tire shop and see if they have a beading tank. that is basically an air tank that quickly releases air into the bead area to pop the tire out.



There is always a last ditch effort...fire beading!!!

When I used to race quads way back when, I had to change tires often. The tires and rims we were using didn't like to bead. Sometimes we would have to use this method.

Find an open area where things can fly without hitting anything important. Find something you can hide behind quickly. Get a fire extinguisher handy. Lay the wheel and tire on the ground. Spray a little starting ether around the bead. Stand back as far as you can, light a paper towel tied to a stick (or something to that effect), and throw it at the wheel. POP!! It's on the bead. Sometimes they fly, sometimes they don't.


I hope some of this helps.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #18
Find an open area where things can fly without hitting anything important. Find something you can hide behind quickly. Get a fire extinguisher handy. Lay the wheel and tire on the ground. Spray a little starting ether around the bead. Stand back as far as you can, light a paper towel tied to a stick (or something to that effect), and throw it at the wheel. POP!! It's on the bead. Sometimes they fly, sometimes they don't.
Now I know where you got your nickname! :smiley_th

I know someone would pay $50 to watch me do the fire bead trick, but I think I'd pay the $50 to have them mounted!:D
 

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85 VN 700
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1,033 Posts
I guess I should consider myself lucky - my total with mounting was $305.96 with new valve stems (no tax since I live in oregon) for a 110 front and stock sized rear ME880. Got em at cyclegear.

If my wife wasn't so posessive of HER camera and HER computer (the one with the image editing software) I'd upload pics - but ya'll will have to wait for fergy :motorcycl

I thanked ya over on Y!, but thanks again fergy for the spline lube writeup - it was tons of help with good pics and better explanation than clymers... I'd still be reinstalling the mufflers if it wasn't for your writeup :pepper:

The 110 is HUGE - looks and feels great. My initial impressions of the ME880's are good.

Back to our regularly scheduled programming....
 
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