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Retired USAF (IYAAYAS)
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674 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just ordered my 12.5" Progressive 412 shocks. Should get them here on or about 3 January and should install them that first or second weekend of next month.

Man I am looking for a softer ride as my originals gave up the ghost and turned the bike into a hardtail.
 

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Retired USAF (IYAAYAS)
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674 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Shocks got here on time. Barring unforeseen circumstances, I should be able to start wrenching tomorrow.
 

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Retired USAF (IYAAYAS)
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674 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Took a half hour, 40 minutes tops from the time it went on the center stand, to the end of cleanup. Old ones popped off without having to even smack them while the Progressives slipped right on. The saddlebags did not enter into the operation.
 
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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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16,076 Posts
Sweet

Sent from my A502DL using Tapatalk
 

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Retired USAF (IYAAYAS)
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674 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yep. It was almost the most textbook, classroom kind of maintenance that I've ever done. Super easy.

Now the weather just needs to cooperate to see what it rides like. And so far, the weather is not cooperating.
 
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Retired USAF (IYAAYAS)
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674 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Apparently not since I don't know what you're referring to.
 

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Super Moderator
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Ah, the shocks should have a “preload” adjustment on them. This is usually a ramped collar underneath the bottom of the spring that rotates and allows you to compress the spring in increments.
Setting the sag is adjusting this collar so the shock compresses a certain amount when a load (your butt) is put on the bike.

Basically all you need to do is hold the bike upright without you weight on the bike, and measure the distance from the center of the upper shock mount nut to the ground. Then getting on the bike, feet up, (helps to have help holding the bike vertically) and taking the same measurement again. This simply gives you how much the bike “sags” or compresses when you are on the bike.

Ideally for a street bike this should be about 3/4”. I’ve read of various ways to get this measurement, from just having two to four folks to hold the bike up when you put your feet up, and one just using a tape measure, to attaching a laser and getting the distance from marks on the wall.
 

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Retired USAF (IYAAYAS)
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674 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Ok, well then, explained that way, yes, I did. The ramp allows different setting according to how much weight will be there or how you want the ride to be. I'm 230 to 240 lbs. I like the ride to be set to almost max. One notch down from max.

So yes, I did adjust that.

ADDITION: Perhaps I am incorrect, don't know, about the purpose behind the adjustments. I always viewed it as a "stiffness" adjustment as opposed to a ride-height adjustment. Either way, I adjusted it to where I adjusted it. Its going to be a long time before I can ride it anyway.
 

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Retired USAF (IYAAYAS)
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674 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
We'll see how it rides (EVENTUALLY since the weather here has sucked and will continue to suck for a long time) and if necessary adjust. I have no one to help me so sitting on it and measuring the shock mount lengths isn't going to happen.
 

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Super Moderator
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Well to be honest, you can get a pretty good idea of what sag you have by just eyeballing the rear end when you sit on it. You should be able to feel the shock compress slightly when you sit on the bike, even if your feet are still touching the ground.
The point is more to insure the shock isn’t compressing too much, limiting the amount of travel you have when say riding over a large bump. Most duel shocks on street bikes have only 3-1/2 to 4 inches of travel. If the bike compressed just under your weight 1 inch, you’ve used 1/4 of the available travel.

This is of course all a subjective thing depending on how you “like your ride” and “how” you ride. If you’re a “bat out of hell” type rider, all this is fairly important. If you’re more of a relaxing cruise type rider, it’s about comfort instead of extreme handling.

I will say they generally for solo riding without luggage, you should be using one of the lower settings, so you will be able to “stiffen it up” if you pile on gear and/or a passenger.

So yes, when you get the chance to ride the bike (we have 3” of snow here) try different adjustments on a road you’re familiar with.
 
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