Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner
41 - 56 of 56 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,866 Posts
Good analogy or parable or metaphor (I don't know which fits best) fergy!
 

·
Old Truck Junkie
Joined
·
4,138 Posts
It depends on how much over you are. It could get into the crank shaft as it turns and cause the oil to foam. This can cause the oil pump to air lock. And the other deal is that it can cause oil leaks that otherwise would never give any problem.

bty....Wecome to the group.
 

·
750 Newbie
Joined
·
6 Posts
The guy I am buying the bike from did an oil change and put 4 qts in saying "The manual says 4 qts" He did this about 200 miles ago so I assume there is no damage. I intend draining the oil and then refilling to the correct amount. Can/should I use the same oil or should I assume the worst and change the oil and filter?

Thanks for the welcome. This group looks like an amazing resource for newbies on a 750 like me.

Ian
 

·
Old Truck Junkie
Joined
·
4,138 Posts
It takes 4 qts or (liters) when the engine is completely dry. If the oil is new, I would just drain down to level. You can use the oil that you prefur at least 10/40 imo. Others here have thier own opinion on the subject. I go with 20/50 castrol all yr round, I have hot weather summer and I don't ride much in winter. It works for me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
If he just changed the oil and filter 200 miles back, then IMO there's no reason you should do a complete oil change. Just put the bike on the centerstand and put a tray under the side drain, open it a little so a small trickle of oil runs out and watch the site glass until you see the small air bubble, and tighten the side drain back up and wipe it down and you're good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
I'd like too add something, 1 US quart =.946 liters
1 liter = 1.056 US quarts
Look on the side of the bottle and see how it's mesured. Our bikes say 4 liters on the case, as stated earlier thats the cap. if the motor is completely drained aftera rebuild. 4 liters = 4.224 US quarts
4 US quarts = 3.784 liters
So if you put 4 US quarts in after an oil change you're only putting in 3.784 liters, witch should be plenty. If you dump in 4 liters than you'll probably be a little over full. If all else fails dump in 3.5 bottle of your fave oil regardless of how its mesured ( I use Castrol 10w40 4T Motorcycle oil in my shop) then start the bike and let it idle for a few min. to let it fill the filter, shut it off, top the oil off up to the full mark on the glass. Make sure bike is level.:dead_hors
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
Just a note about the new Rotella T6 Synthetic, according to the Rotella web site:


Notice it says JASO DH-2, MA

Haven't read any test data on this oil yet from the oil forum but I'll bet it gets good numbers...

The Rotella Dyno 15W40 really gets great reviews on the oil forum, and has a better sheer stability than the older synthetic 5W40. That's a really good oil for the money!
 

·
Rider on the Storm
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #50 · (Edited)
"I've got blisters on my fingers...!"

How do I keep from burning my little pinky when I stick it in to remove the spring, washer, and screen?!

I changed the oil today, a completely satisfying experience, as always. But I have a little blister on the end of my finger from the hot oil, even though I let it drain completely before going after the spring. I don't want to stick a screwdriver in there with that delicate filter screen. Maybe a popsickle stick? A chop stick? Or is there some kind of fingertip technique that I need to try?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,866 Posts
How do I keep from burning my little pinky when I stick it in to remove the spring, washer, and screen?!

I changed the oil today, a completely satisfying experience, as always. But I have a little blister on the end of my finger from the hot oil, even though I let it drain completely before going after the spring. I don't want to stick a screwdriver in there with that delicate filter screen. Maybe a popsickle stick? A chop stick? Or is there some kind of fingertip technique that I need to try?
Develop a faster finger? I use my first finger, which seems to be a little more heat resitant. As soon as the spring comes out, I drop it onto a piece of newspaper. The screen doesn't seem to be as hot, but it goes on the paper too. Within a minute or two, they're cool enough to handle.
 

·
Rider on the Storm
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
I always change the oil cold. That's what the shops do. Hot or cold, there's no way to get all the oil out.
Wow! That would certainly make it easier to handle the bike and the oil. On the other hand, I've always changed the oil while hot to make sure that I got as much of the old oil out as possible. (Unlike some, though, I leave the bike on the center stand throughout the procedure, never tilting the bike on the side stand.)

I think the spring-washer-screen was hotter the other day because, for the first time, I just cracked the plug to release the oil while I went inside to do something else. When I came back out, I removed the cap entirely to go forward with the oil change - so no wonder everything seemed even hotter than usual.
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
I always change the oil cold. That's what the shops do.
Hot or cold, there's no way to get all the oil out.
Just because a shop changes the oil cold, does not mean it is the right way to do it. I suspect if the shop does change it cold, that it is just quicker and costs less for labor for them, than to warm the engine up for 10 minutes. It is no skin off their nose if more dirt is left in the engine after the oil change. Warm, recently circulated oil holds more dirt in suspension than cold oil that has been sitting at rest does. Warm oil also drains faster, and you will get more out of the crankcase, unless you are willing to let the bike sit for an extended period to drip the cold oil.

If you change oil immediately after a long high speed run, I can see how you could burn yourself. In my case the ideal warmup is a 5 mile ride into town to pickup some oil, and home again. The oil is warm, without being hot enough to cause any serious burns, and drains quickly when dropped immediately upon arriving home. This is how I have changed oil in my autos for almost 40 years, and the one time I have dropped the oil out of the Vulcan.

Getting back to Charlie`s original question of how to avoid blisters on his pinky finger when pulling the drain screen out, one more simple idea. Bring out a small container of cold, or ice water to dip your finger in if you burn it. The cold water will immediately draw the heat from the burn and minimize the pain. Put a little aloe vera jelly on it too. Great stuff for any burns and scrapes. JMHO
 
41 - 56 of 56 Posts
Top