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Discussion Starter #1
I have been reading the manual on setting the cams in our engines.
There is a mark on the crank sprocket and case to set the crank at TDC.
You are supposed to measure a set number of links to line everything up at the intermediate sprocket, then measure set number of links to set the cams.
There are marks on the cams you set at the head.
Once the crank is at TDC, all you have to do is line up the cams at the head.
Why go through all of the trouble to count links on the chains when the marks are already there at both the crank and head?
There shouldn't be a balance issue with the chains.
As long as the marks are all lined up top and bottom nothing should be out of alignment.
Am I overlooking something? :)
 

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I think it has something to do with keeping the proper chain tension between the gears. If there were too much slack (one link or more too much between the two gears) when the ACCT/MCCT applied tension to the cam chain, one of the cams would likely spin a bit to get to the chain to the proper tension therefore throwing off your timing.

That's just my .01 cents worth. I could be completely off here. I am by no means an expert
 

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I haven't actually done this, so I don't have an answer. But it could be just like the valve adjustment procedure for most bikes as it is described in the manual. You are supposed to line up a mark o the flywheel with a mark on the flywheel cover. That is not actually necessary, all you have to do, once you have the valve cover off, is just turn the engine over until the valve you want to check/adjust is closed. You don't need to get down there on the floor with a flashlight and a magnifying glass trying to even find those marks. But these manuals are written for amateurs, who might not know when a valve is closed. This could be the same thing. Or, there may be a critical reason for it. I'll check the manual again.
 

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I think it has something to do with keeping the proper chain tension between the gears. If there were too much slack (one link or more too much between the two gears) when the ACCT/MCCT applied tension to the cam chain, one of the cams would likely spin a bit to get to the chain to the proper tension therefore throwing off your timing.

That's just my .01 cents worth. I could be completely off here. I am by no means an expert
that is exactly the right answer,and I will add when rotating the engine manually ,to check that the timing is still spot on ,turn the engine in the direction the manual says if you encounter any abnormal resistance,stop at once, as the valves are easily bent,also make sure the balance shafts are timed correctly or it will shake like crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I know that the vibration damper gears are set a certain way to prevent vibration.
You have a point about an amateur mechanic trying to re-time one of these beasts.
I thought it odd about lining the chains and counter sprocket up. I always double check the cam and chain timing via marks on the crank and cams themselves.
I pre tension the chains on the opposite side of the tensioner so as to make sure the marks are all lined up before I set it.
I like the older style of single cams and 2 valves per cylinder. A LOT easier to work on.
I also like manual adjust rocker arms. Set them once a year and forget them.
No HLA's to worry about. They are nice on these engines cause they are a real PITA to remove to adjust the valves.
 
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