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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Alright let's be honest, it's not always awesome living in the Northeast United States. We get every bit of all four seasons and we get it every year. Some find it irritating and inconvenient while others learned to enjoy it, maybe even love it. Well love it or hate it you have to admit: it makes you tough. Sure our Summers are 3 months of sweltering heat at 90 percent humidity and our Winters are filled with storm upon storm of 5+ inches of snow. In July, you might step out front and feel like you just walked into a bowl of soup. In February, you might head outside and feel like you've happened upon the arctic circle. But as most extremes in most places have a tendency to do: it only makes us tougher.

Northeast's February can be more than daunting, it can be dreaded and justifiably so. It is not uncommon to have three snow storms back-to-back dropping more than 5 inches each over the course of just one week. A mix of fluffy snow, heavy slushy stuff, and a nice half-inch thick ice topping is not unheard of - in just one storm. Let's not forget that in order for said phenomenon to exist, the temperature must be below 32 degrees Fahrenheit. That said, it's usually far...far worse. February's mercury can dip into single digits. Compounding that, it is almost always windy so you have to factor in the abominable "wind chill." As if seeing the thermometer read "4" wasn't bad enough, we have the news reports telling us, "it feels like negative 12." Supermarkets are a panicked mob scene, the roads are accident laden, and the only thing sporting double digits are the snow totals.

But over the years this has hardened us - not our personalities but our spirits. We arise early, adorn 4 layers of clothes, and trudge out in the cold deep snow. It's difficult and inconvenient but we do it anyway because we're tough. We raise our shovels and sweat in 9 degrees while freeing our cars from Winter's icy grip. But we dont' stop there - we then help the new neighbor and the old friend dig out their cars - and we usually make a friend along the way. We huff and puff through the 11 inches of snow to meet our children at the bus stop and shake new hands there as well. It takes strength and stamina to walk through that amount of snow but we do it because we're tough. We brave the icy and often deadly winds to bring the elderly neighbor some hot soup. We can do that because we're tough. Yes, it's cold, hard-going, slippery, dangerous, and even life-threatening. But we perservere because we were made to.

So if your cabinet is full of sunscreen and de-icer: hold your head high. If your closet has both flip-flops and snow boots: smile proudly. And if your garage has both boogie boards and radial flyers: know you're likely tougher than most. And when your friend in California gloats about the weather being "so nice" year round: remember that cup of coffee with something special in it the morning of the first snow day. Remember the childlike giddiness attained only by a very unexpected day off. Remember sitting by the warm crackling fire and smiling playfully at the one you love. And remember when the weather gets bad again, because it certainly will, that we're Northeasterners - and we can take it.
 

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moved to florida for a few months, between the blue hair drivers, fire ants and those damn gators i couldnt get back home fast enough. a few hours ride to the beach, mountains are here, can shoot my guns at my house and yes the marvels of winter made be head home
 

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Headbanger/Popes of Hell
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well, not only are we tough.......but we are too stupid to move! ;)

now, as for shooting guns at ones house..........I just read about a person in FL., that made a small "range" in his back yard and he didn't have a very beg yard either. his neighbors were pissed when they found out that this was/is legal in FL..
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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"Living in the notheast" is WAY too broad though...location is a definite key to survival and dealing with it....example...when I lived in the boonies of the Adirondacks, the air was dry, so low humidity made hot summers and cold winters bearable...as did the lack of people, lol....

Now, if you live in the heart of Manhattan, yer either totally certifiable, or stay indoors 1/2 the year, lol....
 
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