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Discussion Starter #1
Hello there! I have been reading over this forum for the last several days doing some research on the 750 Vulcan. This seems like a great place to ask some questions and get some advice, so here goes.

I found an '86 Vulcan the other day for about $800 that I'm planning on buying. The guy that has it says it will start if you shoot starter fluid in the carb, it will idle for a few seconds and then cut out. He pulled the plugs and the front one was dry and normal looking, while the back one is wet. My thinking here is the carbs probably just need cleaned. They guy he bought it from a couple months ago had it sitting for a while, and it's been sitting for about 2 more months since he bought it.

Any thoughts on this? Could this be as simple as just pulling the carbs and giving them a thorough cleaning? Or should I be looking for some sort of rebuild kit? This would be my first bike if I buy it, and from everything I've read it will be a lot of fun to own and ride.

Thanks in advance for any help!
 

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Chucklehead
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If you are looking for a carb kit, stop now, there isn't one. On the plus side, there are no gaskets to worry about in the carbs, just O-rings. The symptoms described sound like a good cleaning is in order, always a good place to start. Pull the petcock and clean that too. After that add some Seafoam to the tank and go from there. Sounjds like a good deal, if I knew where it was I might snag it out from under you, enjoy and welcome to the madness!!
 

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Sounds like a good deal to me. Heck, I'll bet you'd get your money back in parts alone if it doesn't work out.


Welcome to the forums.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you are looking for a carb kit, stop now, there isn't one. On the plus side, there are no gaskets to worry about in the carbs, just O-rings. The symptoms described sound like a good cleaning is in order, always a good place to start. Pull the petcock and clean that too. After that add some Seafoam to the tank and go from there. Sounjds like a good deal, if I knew where it was I might snag it out from under you, enjoy and welcome to the madness!!
Thanks for the welcome!

Yeah I looked for a rebuild kit for a couple hours last night before giving up in frustration. I figured they might exist like they do for other bikes, but apparently not. Glad to hear it's just O-rings! Here's a pic of the bike that the guy put up, sorry it's not big or high quality, but I plan on fixing that once it's mine. I love the color of this bike.

Unfortunately it's got a big dent in the tank, not terribly worried about it, though I may fix it by putting a bigger tank on.
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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Unfortunately it's got a big dent in the tank, not terribly worried about it, though I may fix it by putting a bigger tank on.
Good luck with putting a bigger tank on. It's been thought about here a good bit but a suitable larger tank is a lot easier to talk about than it is to find.
If you do find something that fits, please be sure to let us know.

And welcome to the wonderful world of Vulcan!! :smiley_th
 

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On His Lady Vulcan
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A dent puller, Lots of Bondo and a ton of sandpaper might fix that tank right up. As for the value and potential of the bike, for $800 you better buy it. I purchased my '86 for the same price but with a bad stator, $150 and change and 2 weekends later I wouldnt sell her for under $2300.00

Peace :beerchug:
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Thanks for the welcome!

Yeah I looked for a rebuild kit for a couple hours last night before giving up in frustration. I figured they might exist like they do for other bikes, but apparently not. Glad to hear it's just O-rings! Here's a pic of the bike that the guy put up, sorry it's not big or high quality, but I plan on fixing that once it's mine. I love the color of this bike.

Unfortunately it's got a big dent in the tank, not terribly worried about it, though I may fix it by putting a bigger tank on.
35 years or so ago I heard of a big propane tank (500 gals+) with a big dent in it that they fixed. Filled it up with water and then applied pressure with either a high pressure water pump or air compressor. They then took a big sledge hammer an tapped along the edge of the dent until the dent was worked out.

I`m just throwing out an idea here that is a little off the wall,FWIW.

I`m just wondering if a similar procedure might work here? I`m not sure exactly how you would seal the openings in the tank and install an air valve to pressurize it to 15 or 20 PSI. I would be very cautious about going to a pressure much higher in case it comes apart. Tapping with a soft faced hammer or a rubber mallet around the edge may work this dent out too.

So what do you all think? Does this stand a chance of sucess or am I wasting his time?
 

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Chucklehead
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It works. I have filled tanks with water and set them in a freezer to get a few out, but they were smaller dents. Either way it's repairable, another thought is weld on studs to pull it out, I've used those alot as well. but it's best to let a bodyshop that has the equip do that, it gets expensive (aka the gun) and needs a repaint afterwards.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well the bike is now mine, I will be picking it up on Saturday when I can get a trailer there to bring it back home (I'll post some pics up then). The issue with the carbs may not be as bad as previously thought. I looked inside them and saw no dirt or build up, they were however missing a vacuum hose. He was also trying to start it on the kickstand, with the kill switch engaged... He also left the fuel switch on prime. Hopefully I can get it to start right up once I get the vacuum line replaced. :rockon:
 

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Premium Member
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Put a similar dent in the other side and tell everybody you're making room for your knee's....

:)

Or get creative with some paint, and lots of folks will be denting their tanks. ;)
 

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that's a pretty big dent. im thinking the water pressure trick may not work and you'll risk the chance of splitting the tank seams. i agree with dragon with the weld on studs being your best option. even if you brought it to a body shop & have them pull out the dent. then you can take it home and bondo/paint it yourself.
 

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Chucklehead
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I never did see where abouts you are, But then we're only a few mouse clicks away if needed.
 

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Is it just me or does this sound like a somewhat humorous approach (with the potential of disaster) to fix a tank. OK, take a steal cylinder/tank, and pressurize it(with water) until the pressure is great enough to expand the metal, then hammer on the weakest seam! Hmmmmmmm? Someones getting wet it sounds like
 

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Discussion Starter #15
that's a pretty big dent. im thinking the water pressure trick may not work and you'll risk the chance of splitting the tank seams. i agree with dragon with the weld on studs being your best option. even if you brought it to a body shop & have them pull out the dent. then you can take it home and bondo/paint it yourself.
Yeah, there is a matching dent on the other side too. PO doesn't know how they got they as they were already there when he purchased it. What I may do is have someone cut out the dents and weld new sheet steel onto it. Conveniently enough my dad is a welder and works on high pressure steam pipes so he should be able to do it for me. I may go ahead and have him cut it and see if I can't get another gallon or so added onto the tank. That will all have to wait till winter though, as I am hoping to get it running quick and hopefully ride it a bit before this ohio weather makes me park it for the winter.
 

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Chucklehead
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Another thought is you might be able to get in with a prybar through the filler opening and slowly and carefully push it out. Just make sure all sharp corners are rounded off and you go SLOW!! Start at the shallow end and work your way back. I wouldn't cut it up quite yet, but if you do you might look into increasing capacity.
 

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Another thought is you might be able to get in with a prybar through the filler opening and slowly and carefully push it out. Just make sure all sharp corners are rounded off and you go SLOW!! Start at the shallow end and work your way back. I wouldn't cut it up quite yet, but if you do you might look into increasing capacity.
good idea, i have used pieces of wood to pop out sheet metal dents in the past. as long as you can get some leverage it may work.
 

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Addicted to Projects
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There was an info-mercial on TV a few years ago that used a skinny pry bar through the drainage holes in the cage door to pop out dents from grocery carts and hail damage type dents. Biggest problem with trying to push them out is trying to not crack the paint finish, unless a paint job is in order anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well the bike is now home and I have some pictures.

Bike

Couple questions:

The carb on the right side of the bike appears to be missing a hose of some sort, it has a red cap on one of the nozzles, is it supposed to be like that? If not where is the hose that goes to it?

Carb

As well I found another hose laying loose under the seat when I pulled it up. Where does it go? I have the 2300 page service manual but it is pretty terrible about showing where some of these things go.

Hose

I managed to get it running a bit (not very well) it idled around 2k, but would bounce between 1k and 2k (it wasn't very steady), any thoughts on what this would be?
 

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welcome to the forum! where is fairborn? I'm in chillicothe, about 45 miles south of columbus. riding an 86 too and wouldnt trade her for nothing.
 
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