Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Just a regular guy
Joined
·
833 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just had a lady pull out in front of me while I was traveling 40mph... she made a right hand turn directly into the lane I was in. And the funny part is, she was putting on her SEAT BELT!!! Thankfully the truck to my left was paying attention and slowed quickly enough to allow me to swerve into his lane and avoid her. But man was it scary. The guy in the truck even made an attempt to catch up to me for him and his daughter to give me a thumbs up for my semi skills.

The things I take from this are:

I need to pay more attention to the cars on the side streets, I have become focused on watching my front more than anything else... I will fix that.

Also, that not all cagers are idiots, the guy in the truck was spot on.

And I hit my horn pretty good, but couldn't hear it with the ear plugs in.....

Stay safe out there.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,354 Posts
Way to go brother !...those are the kinda reflexes some can NEVER assimilate, even after years...
Was that old lady a jewish looking woman resembling Joan Rivers ??...lotta "Joan Rivers" types down in Fla...
Buddy of mine lives in Beverly Hills, FL...78 yrs old, great driver (helluva vet and CMOH)...and HE gripes about the "retired transplants"....
Thing to remember for FLA...."if you see gray, stay away !"....lol....
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
Thumbs up on the riding skills. :smiley_th

If you aren`t familiar with James R. Davis and the msgroup forum, you might want to spend a little time reading his safety tips:
http://www.msgroup.org/

I also recommend every mc rider, from newbies to the old hands, get copy of David L. Hough`s books on "Proficient Motorcycling" and read them over again at least once a riding season. Old riders don`t get to be that way by accident. (Pun intended. :))
http://www.amazon.com/David-L.-Hough/e/B001JOWE2I/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
I had an oncoming driver make a left hand turn across my lane, cutting me off, while coming home from work yesterday but I was prepared as I always cover my brakes when riding through traffic. In all honesty I was not in the best position to be seen by him though. It was a 4 lane undivided main street, (speed limit 30mph) just between the commercial sector of downtown and a residential area. I was in the right hand track of the left lane, following a few car lengths behind a truck or SUV and so was not realy visible to the oncoming driver until the truck in front of me was almost past him and he had started to turn. MY Bad! :doh:

I know from reading safety forums and books menioned in my previous post that usually the best place to be positioned to see and be seen in that situation is in left track of the left lane. I was just about to move over when the incident occured. It was really a non incident I guess, because I was prepared to slow or stop. I really couldn`t be upset as the driver waved and mouthed "sorry", even as he crossed in front.

It would have been a lot worse if I had been tailgating the truck.:wow:
Be careful out there guys, and strive to ride as well as you know how to!
 

·
FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
Joined
·
16,093 Posts
good ridin man.glad you are safe.i allways ride like someone is gonna hit me.i read a post on here once about a trick to make your bike more visable.if you see someone who you think is gonna pull out in front of you,start weaving back and forth in your lane to make yourself more visable.most people don't see bikes until they are right on top of them because they are not that wide.moving back and forth makes you more visable.i have been using this technique for a couple of months now and have not(knock on wood)had anyone pull out in front of me
 

·
Just a regular guy
Joined
·
833 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guy. For me it was definitely all instinct. There was no real thought in the process. I am lucky enough to have been blessed with quick reflexes and what has seemed to be the correct instincts all my life. I actually realized that I barely even looked to the left before using it as an escape route. Lucky me!

Glad to see you made it through OHC. I certainly will be paying better attention from now on(once the bike is back up).
 

·
Undercover Sportbiker
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
I really couldn`t be upset as the driver waved and mouthed "sorry", even as he crossed in front.
Yes you could. Saying sorry doesn't cut it when you put another person's life in danger. Of course, getting the "sorry" is better than the a-holes who get pissed like it's YOUR fault they turned in front of you.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
Thumbs up on the riding skills. :smiley_th

If you aren`t familiar with James R. Davis and the msgroup forum, you might want to spend a little time reading his safety tips:
http://www.msgroup.org/

I also recommend every mc rider, from newbies to the old hands, get copy of David L. Hough`s books on "Proficient Motorcycling" and read them over again at least once a riding season. Old riders don`t get to be that way by accident. (Pun intended. :))
http://www.amazon.com/David-L.-Hough/e/B001JOWE2I/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
may I also suggest Keith Code's "A Twist Of The Wrist II"
and
"Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques" by Lee Parks
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,354 Posts
Ya know (to all)...books are great...they give ya things to look and strive for...but IMO, there are some things a new rider can learn only ONE way (same fer driving a cage)...time doing it...
New riders should stay on the back/sideroads fer a year...away from traffic...check yer reflexes when a squirrel runs right in front....and Ill tell ya, after being on the road since the 70s, only road experience will truly teach you...that, and its almost inborn too...some got it, some dont...like the neighborhood kid that never could really ride his bicycle w/o falling...I think with practice, most can handle it...but some, will never "get it"...like Korean immigrants in cars...(not meaning to be racist, just truthful)...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
While it is true that there is no replacement for hands on practice, you have to know what to practice. Its not like teaching yourself to play guitar, you make a mistake on the street it can kill you. And there are things about motorcycling that are counter intuitive: "counter steering" for example. Plenty of bikers have no clue how a bike turns. I know guys who dont use their front brake. They don't realize the front brake can have 100% of the bike weight on it in a hard stop. How many times have you heard someone say they had to lay the bike down to avoid an accident. Sorry, but that is an accident. Rubber has higher friction than steel, so why would you ever lay it down? How many times have you heard about someone blowing a curve and eating the guardrail. They probably got scared and chopped the throttle , locked up their arms, and staired at the guardrail as they drove right into it. These books can teach you propper technique and possibly save your life. Don't discount them.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,354 Posts
The problem though, is many who teach, have no clue. My buddy went to a course after riding fer 15 yrs, to get a cut in insurance. They swore up and down that is always better to lay a bike down, lol...bet not one of those instructors ever had roadrash....for new riders, a course or book may be fine, but for someone whose ridden his whole life, its countereducational and frustrating.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
The problem though, is many who teach, have no clue. My buddy went to a course after riding fer 15 yrs, to get a cut in insurance. They swore up and down that is always better to lay a bike down, lol...bet not one of those instructors ever had roadrash....for new riders, a course or book may be fine, but for someone whose ridden his whole life, its countereducational and frustrating.
Can't teach an old wolf new tricks. Too bad, really.
As far as I concerned, you should never stop learning and or practicing/trying new things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
I learned a lot form my older brother when I 1st started driving truck. He told me to ALWAYS have a way out. Look around you, be prepared.
That motto has saved me from a LOT of accidents, especially in bigger cities.
I'm always looking around, and my other half is always asking my why. Her thinking is to grab the steering wheel and slam on the brakes. She panics, and had come way to close to getting hit head on from another car in an intersection last year.
I plan on taking a STAR course this summer, and take another one next year. I have taken them in the past for brushing up my skills and I always learn something each time.
They aren't that expensive, and here in Idaho they actually help with insurance rates.
Reading is great, but the books don't count towards real world experience. Riding does.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
...Reading is great, but the books don't count towards real world experience. Riding does.
Obviously..... books are for information.
Then you go out and practice what you have learned and apply it to 'real world experience.'
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,354 Posts
Reading is great, but the books don't count towards real world experience. Riding does.
You GOT it !

Obviously..... books are for information.
Then you go out and practice what you have learned and apply it to 'real world experience.'
But if the "books" are wrong (common nowadays), theyre teaching improper technique.
When I started riding, the only book there was, was Zen Motorcyling (forgot the actual name)...

Can't teach an old wolf new tricks. Too bad, really.
As far as I concerned, you should never stop learning and or practicing/trying new things.
No sir...ya cant...I DO however read and listen, but after 40 yrs on 2 wheels, I discard most...much of what is taught is done so on theory and statistics...well, both are flawed as all know.

I had ONE accident in these years...89 I think...due to the driver's statement, he was clearly at fault ("did the motorcycle have his headlight on ?"..."yes"...then why did you pull in front of him ?".."because I did not see him"). An old Delta 88 (the boat kind) pulled right in front of me...I was too close to stop using brakes...what do the "pros" say ?..."lay it down'...well, had I done that, the Iranian MF would have ran over me and the bike together...Instead, I KNEW I was going to hit, so I stood up on the pegs just before impact and flew 40 feet like Superman (didnt land like him though)...but I cleared the actual accident, broke my left forearm and dislocated my right shoulder (crushed the ball on landing)...I then rolled off to the side of the macadam right into a puddle of slush...
Bet none of them books teach THAT... ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
You have some good stories wolf..... Maybe you should write a book.
But my point is this: I own and have read all three of these books and recommend them to other motorcycle riders. They are writen by experts with many years and tens of thousands of miles of experiance. The information in them is spot on. I'm assuming you have not looked at them, and therefore can't pass judgement on them. And I'd say most of the 'wrong' information comes from well meaning friends.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,354 Posts
..... Maybe you should write a book
I actually have 4 unfinished novels....none on biking...

They are writen by experts
Not to be insulting, but Wikipedia claims to have input from "experts" and was proven wrong (bigtime)...so, why would a well seasoned rider, trust some kid who did some research and wrote a book ? One thing I DID notice, about a few of these instructional guides, is that NOT ONE stated "to be one" with your bike...to "learn" your bike, its faults and strong points...all just preach what they do, or you should do, often without explainations why...
The FIRST thing even a seasoned rider needs to do is "become one with the bike"...because if you dont know ALL of what yer bike can/cannot do, all advice is useless.
Example :...when I first got my Vulcan, I took it to a deserted road...accellerated, then forced a skid on a straight...then, on a curve...I dont care how many books someone reads, if ya dont KNOW yer bike and its capabilities, its all fer naught....
Yep, cant sell an old wolf new stories....but thats just me...and I have nothing against newer riders reading up...at least the'd have the basics then, and can learn from road time. Remember too, each road situation is different...how can all those varriables be documented in a one book ? Logic fails.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
I actually have 4 unfinished novels....none on biking...
Just a book on your life experiance would be interesting to read... :wow:

so, why would a well seasoned rider, trust some kid who did some research and wrote a book ?
I believe their credibility can not be challenged......

David L. Hough "Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well"

"David L. Hough (born 1937) is an American writer on motorcycle rider safety, education and training. He has been, or currently is a columnist for Motorcycle Consumer News, Sound RIDER! and BMW Owners News magazines, and has several published books. He has won the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Excellence in Motorcycle Journalism award twice.
He has also designed a rider skills course for sidecar riders. Hough has been called "a premier motorcycling journalist" and the author of "one of the most widely respected books on safe street riding." In the media he is frequently called upon to provide expert commentary on motorcycling issues, and his work is on the recommended reading lists of many other motorcycling writers.
Hough was inducted to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in December 2009 for his work as a motorcycle journalist and riding safety books that "should be a mandatory read for every motorcyclist, from novice to expert."

Keith Code "A Twist of the Wrist 2: The Basics of High-Performance Motorcycle Riding"

"Keith Code is a former motorcycle racer, writer, and founder of the California Superbike School. He has been called "arguably the best known and most successful on-track motorcycle instructor in the world"
Code founded the California Superbike School in 1980. The school has taught numerous championship winning riders such as Wayne Rainey. As of 2009, riders who have been trained either at his schools or by him personally have won 49 world and national racing championships. His teaching has been spread all over the world. His California Superbike Schools have operated at over 90 tracks worldwide in 15 countries and have trained 150,000 riders.

In 2006 he was tasked by the United States Marine Corps to design a rider training program that would be effective in reducing serious motorcycle accidents among USMC riders. The program, called Advanced Motorcycle Operator School, is now considered the "gold Standard" of rider training by Marine safety personnel due to its graduates' extraordinary safety record over a four year period.
Code has invented rider training devices such as the No Body Steering Bike which illustrates the necessity for counter-steering to be used, the Lean and Slide Bike Trainers that train not only good body positioning and visual skills but also allow riders to experience sliding the machine with much reduced possibility of crashing, and the Panic Braking Trainer that allows riders to experience front wheel lock up and learn how to recover from it."

Lee Parks "Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques"

"Lee Parks has been racing for 25 years and won the 2001 G.M.D. Computrack National Endurance Series Championship in the Lightweight class. He also finished 2nd in the 1994 AMA 125GP national championship in its exhibition year. He spent five years as the editor and chief test rider of Motorcycle Consumer News where he road tested every new street motorcycle available in the U.S. and became one of the top performance-testing journalists in the world."

Nuff Said... :smiley_th
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,354 Posts
Okay, I will submit that a "bike racer", knows 20x more than most...has to...so, ok...youve shown the credentials of the writers...thank you, and I will try to read a few of these....I raced as well back when...motocross and flattrack, never asphault...so perhaps i could learn a few things...in winter, Im basically hosebound...might be a good time to do it then...thanks again...

Just a book on your life experiance would be interesting to read...
An autobiography is one of them actually...just difficult for me to write a lot anymore due to the arthritis in my hands and fingers. A friend sent me a copy of "Dragon" which converts voice to text. Sadly, were a number of shipping screwups whilst en route, and never got it. I'd have had tomes written by now, lol...just wasnt in the stars...
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top