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Discussion Starter #1
I was doing a pre-ride inspection of my bike today and found a nail near the middle of the rear tread. This is why I say a prayer before every ride and why I'm thankful I've got someone watching over me. Since the tire isn't losing any air and the nail is completely flush with the tread, how serious is it. And how much labour should I expect to be charged with when I take it in to be patched or plugged?
 

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Personally. I am not a big fan of plugging bike tires,there is just too much at risk,but if you can't afford a new tire and I realize how that is too,and you must plug the tire break it down and use one of the internal plugs that have a glue on tire patch built in that glues to the inside of the tire casing after the plug is pulled through from the inside out,and are much less likely to cause you problems with leaks or coming out unexpectedly,I do carry my own tire plugging kit but it is for emergency use only.you will probably have to go to a placr thjat repairs truck tires to find the type of plug I am talking about and I 'd say between breaking down and plugging the tire you will be looking at least $30 up to $60 for the good plugs,And anywhere from 10 to 25 for a plain old push in type plug at the service station.It is bad when this happens to a tire that that is almost new but if it is starting to be pretty worn it may be the one who is watching over you getting your attention gently,you Know how He is ,just be thankful either way,He got your attention before some thing bad happened, and say one for us all before you ride,Denny
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I will for sure. The tire is really fresh actually so I don't want to replace it unless absolutely necessary. Are all motorcycle tires made of nylon like both of mine are?
 

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I`ve never yet had to have a tire replaced or repaired, so I don`t know exactly what it costs around here. My guess is between $30-$100, depending on whether I take the tire and wheel off myself, and just take that in to be repaired, or if I take the bike in and have them do the whole job, including lubing the rear splines. If you do not KNOW that the splines have been lubed properly, I would remove the tire/wheel assembly myself, and take that in for repairs, OR use a stopngo mushroom plug repair kit. Then lube the rear splines before reinstalling the rear wheel.

DISCLAIMER:This is what I would do in the same situation, but I will not tell you what you should do.

I would go to www.stopngo.com , and watch and read everything on the website about their mushroom plugs for tubeless tires. For legal reasons, most of the tire makers and the patch/plug makers and tire repair shops tell us that plugs are only a temporary repair, to get you to a shop, for a permenant repair, or preferably a new tire. There are many first hand testimonials on the site of riders who have ridden many thousands of miles more on a tire with this mushroom headed plug installed. They never had it replaced with a permenant plug/patch applied from the inside.

I figure for a cost similar to taking the tire in for repair at a shop, I can purchase one of their plug kits, and have 24 plugs left over for the next nail that I find. The nail is in the middle of the tread so even the tire repair shops agree that is a pretty safe area to repair. If the puncture is in the sidewall, well then it usually is not safe to repair.

So now you know a few options you may consider. You pays your money, and takes your choice. There is help here if you want to tackle this first repair yourself. It is not nearly so difficult as you may think. I`m sure other first timers here will tell you so. If you use the stopngo plugs, you will also learn a skill that may later save a ride. A flat tire that could end a ride , will become no more than a minor inconvienience, and you are back on the road in a few minutes.

EDIT. Denny is a faster typer than me, so posted before I finished. I agree with him 100% on ordinary string or strip plugs, they are only for emergency use. The stopngo mushroom head plug acts more like the patch with a plug that a shop would use.

Also check out stopngo`s engine powered, tire inflation hose that screws into a sparkplug opening.
 

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I will for sure. The tire is really fresh actually so I don't want to replace it unless absolutely necessary. Are all motorcycle tires made of nylon like both of mine are?
I think someone mentioned radial tires for the vn750, but I`m not sure. We may only have the bias-ply, which would be the nylon cords or belts that you refer to.:(
 

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I have been considering buying one of the kits Ol Hoss is referring to and I don't blame you for not wanting to throw a very good tire aside,you could put a patch on the inside and run a tube although i have never done it e=with a mag type wheel ,the big draw back is with a tube it is usually instant flat .I sat usual because my old electra glide ran one through the tread into the tube and out the side wall and held air. I noticed it at a gas stop and pulled it out ,like a dummy and watched it go flat.I have never used it but there have been several post on here about Ride On tire sealant and it enjoys a pretty good rep on here.Maybe a plug and a can of that will solve your problems ,Like Hoss these are just suggestions you are the one looking at it and depending on it so the decision is yours
,hope I helped in some small way,Denny
 

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OL Hoss you are in a bad way if I out type you I got one of those learn to type with Mavis Beacon CD roms and failed the first lesson and gave that up as an old dog trying to learn a new trick,Pesronally I think Mavis is a smart aleck LOL
 

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Two things you must rely on with a motorcycle, tires and brakes. I had a screw in the rear of my meanie, flush with the thread, looked pretty safe. Plan was just to ride it home.

This Avon Storm ST56 radial only had 2,000 miles on it. I removed the screw at home and in less than 30 seconds, the tire was flat. Took it off and put on a new one.

It is my feeling that if you disturb the tire plies/belts in any way, you are asking for trouble. A blow out on a bike isn't pretty. It's a personal decision, but that's how I feel about it.

Jon
 

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I'm impressed with the quality of each of these posts. Each one clearly states a viewpoint and is not judgemental. So far I find this Forum to be one of the BEST.
 

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About now is probably a good time to introduce some forum members to a product mentioned in earlier, similar threads:

http://www.ride-on.com/test_motorcycle.asp

I'm not necessarily advocating that you apply this product to your tire now that it already has a puncture, but it's good for you to be aware of this stuff, nonetheless (if you're not already).

I don't work for these people, and I'm not a distributor for them either, just a satisfied customer. Great "peace of mind" product for anyone running motorcycle tires--especially if said tires are tubeless!!!

Besides excellent puncture sealing properties, Ride On will also better seal your tires b4 a flat situation so they hold air much better, day-in and day-out.

Avoid the "Slime" brand of tire-seal products for your motorcycle--"Ride On" is the real deal....:smiley_th
 

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I would leave the nail in the tire, add RideOn, ride it long enough to spread the product in the tire, pull the nail, and see what happens. If it doesn't leak, and it shouldn't, ride it and forget it. But that's just me, and I'm cheap. No tire removal, no trip to a dealership (unless that's where you buy the RideOn). All you would be out is the cost of a bottle of RideOn, unless you find you like the stuff so much you add it to the other tire!
 

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Being of Okie Stock (Father, Gr-Father, & Gr-Mother) Born and raised in Oklahoma.
Their tire sealent of choice was Canned-Milk.

I know! That's what I thought too. But I watched my dad put some in a flat-tire he had.
He wore the tire out before it ever went flat again.

I've never tried it myself. I do know that the guys at the tire shops hate the stop-leak stuff. I was waiting to get a flat fixed when one of the guys opened a tire and what looked like 1/2 a gallon of Slimy stuff poured out of the tire.

Yup. They don't like it. But it was still funny the reaction of the guys................
 

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One of the techs that I've known for many years at the local Honda shop said that on a tire that's relatively new that got a nail, unless it was in the sidewall, he would just pull the wheel and add a tube to the tire, balance it and go on. Obviously he'd pull the nail first. I know you can put a tube in any tubeless tire, so I don't see why this wouldn't be fine? Just curious.
 

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Although I too am a Ride-On user, and reccomend the stuff, I have in the past plugged tires with the "sticky string" type plugs and have never had a problem.

I bought a kit at Wal-mart for just a couple of bucks and keep it with the bike on trips...but so far have only used it on the cages.

Using an innertube in a tubeless tire is perhaps a good idea in an emergency, but as a full time fix is kinda stupid. If you have to break the tire down , you miight as well use a patch..(along with the plug) tubeless tires are designed to run at a specific heat range and adding a tube will increase tire temp.

Oddly I have heard of the mushroom type plugs falling out, and folks here think they are better than the sticky string kind...which seem to be reccomended alot on the ST forums ovet the mushrooms.

If it were my tire, (and it did not have Ride On in it) I would pull the nail out and insert one of the string type plugs, fill it with air test for leaks...then, add the proper amount of Ride On.

I think many folks get a bit too paranoid about their bike tires, and as they are kinda important, I understand why. But in the 30 plus years I have been riding and working on bikes, I have not heard or seen a bike tire "blow out" unless it hit something on the road that tore the tire.
If a plug were to "fall out"... you would lose air ...but not as violently. If you are paying attention like you should when riding, you will know something is wrong before it becomes dangerous.

Again, just my opinion and not telling you what to do with your bike.


KM
 

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I am not sure where my head was yesterday, when I posted about using plugs. I never even thought about using Ride-On sealant in a tire with a nail in it already. In reading and re-reading this whole thread, upon reconsideration, I would use the Ride-On sealant as flitecontrol or KM have suggested. It will likely stop any future punctures, and the need for plugs, as well as prolong tire life by keeping tire pressure more constant, and continuing to balance it. The Ride-On sealant is water soluble, and flushes out much easier than the green SLIME brand that tire repair techs hate so much, when the time comes for tire repair or replacement.

I have an inexpensive string and strap plug kit that I am going to test on an old tire. Then I will have a better idea of how reliable it is as a long term fix, as opposed to just for emergency use.

I have only used a tire plug once, and that was on a pick-up truck tire. I phoned a friend who owned a tire shop, to come rescue me, when my little screw up GMC jack collapsed on the side of the road. It took less time to insert the strap plug and air the tire up, than it would have taken me to jack the truck up. Perhaps I could have driven on that plug until the tire wore out, but I relied on it to go to work, so took the tire in the next day for breakdown and a patch applied to the inside.

Just a thought regarding one of the mushroom plugs coming out. If the plug was used in a hole or cut larger than it was designed for, I believe it could happen. If it is used as directed, I do not believe there is any way for it to work its way out, as the head has a flat surface diameter, larger than the hole, sealed against the inner tire surface.

I would also carry the plugs to aid another rider or cager on the road. In this situation you would need a means of inflation, like a 12 volt pump or the hose pump that screws into a spark plug opening on the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
You guys are the best. I priced out a new tire at the dealer today and am looking at $180+ for the whole thing. The dealer said for liability reasons they could not plug a tire for me, but they would pull the tire and let me do it myself. I've never had to plug a tire, do I need to remove it from the rim before I do this? That Ride-On sounds like a great idea when coupled with a plug so I think I'm going to take that route. I've been riding on the nail for at least 200 miles and have had no problems, but I don't plan to just ignore it. I think I'm going to order some Ride-On tonight and give it a shot.
 

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if you know where a full service Gas Station that sells tires and does minor repairs as well you might get them to plug the tire for you or if you know another biker or off roader ,most can show you how to properly plug a tire and that sounds like a reasonable rte to take,you can buy the pluging kit with the old style plugs and the tools at Advance or Autozone for cheap and put the rest in your tool kit for later use if needed,Denny
 

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There are instructions with the kit when you buy it. However, they often include a reamer to file down the steel belts in radial tires so the hole is nice and smooth and you don't have any interference inserting the plug. This makes for a smooth, but larger hole. No need to do this with a non-radial tire, which most motorcycle tires are.

Here is a simplified method for mc tires. Mark where the nail is and remove it. Wait for the tire to go flat or remove the valve stem if you're in a hurry. Apply a small pea sized dab of rubber cement (usually provided with the kit) to the outside of the hole. (If you don't have any cement, don't sweat it. Used plugs for years without it and never had a leak.) Push the insertion tool (without a plug) through the dab of cement and into the tire. Want to coat the sides of the hole with cement. Remove tool from tire and place a string into the slot in the insertion tool, leaving equal lengths of string on either side. Slowly push the tool into the hole and stop when all but about 3/8" of string has been pushed in. Remove the tool, and air up the tire. Check for leaks and if none, use a sharp blade to cut the plug as even with the tread as you can. Done.

You can pay for the kit with one, or at most two, repairs versus having a shop do it.
 

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And as Paul Harvey used to say" That's the rest of the story" Very clear directions there flite ,we need you to start writing them on packages ,at least we can understand you,LOL,Denny
 

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Hey VR24, have you gone to the Ride-On site and really watched it. The sealant is designed to be forced down into the puncture track thru the tire, when the nail is pulled. It creates its own plug. I would install the Ride-On sealant, air up and drive a few miles to get it spread out evenly, stop and pull the nail out. Check air pressure and continue the ride. Continue to check air pressure a few more times throughout the day. If it is not losing air, and it should not be doing so, I would consider it fixed. Doing it this way, I avoid even having to remove the wheel and tire from the bike.
 
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