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Dirt to road
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231 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well rode for about 2 weeks now to work and back and was nothing but awesomeness. I was heading home today minding my own business bout to go on my favorite s curve in the road, 20 mph left 90 degree curve. I love to hit that going bout 25 mph and tip my bike and lay it down till the foot pegs drag. Anyway i was slowing down and started to lean into the curve when a car that i couldn't see cause of trees was driving in my lane! I then threw my bike the opposite way to the right and slammed on my brakes, went off the road lost control and tipped my over on the left and i rolled foward in a bean field. Another second sooner i would have been hit head on. The guy kept driving and didn't even stop, 6 people drove by and never stopped.... broken thumb i think, scrapes, broken turn signals, mirror, handle bar slightly bent, clutch lever bent, ans forks outta alignment. Coulda been alot worst...
 

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Glad you're ok!
 
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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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Glad you're OK man
 

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First Crash

Sorry to hear of your accident. Remember to ride like everone is out to get you. Sounds like you handled it as well as you can something like that. The bean field was a good landing place. To bad the passers by weren't more helpful.
Hope you can get the bike back on the road soon.
 

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Let's hope that is your last crash. Wishing you a speedy recovery and quick fix on your cycle. With that said, always think that you are not seen and drive defensively. Watch for any signs indicating curves, slow down and get into the portion of the lane away from on-coming traffic. If you are hitting the foot pegs in the turns, you are leaning over too far and going to fast. That sort of thing can take you down.
Good Luck.
 

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Jack of all trades
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2,863 Posts
Bummer man. What sucks is you just got it on the road. But anything you can walk away from is something to be thankful for.
 

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Dirt to road
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231 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Amen angel. Im so glad that i walked, hell rode away haha thank you all! Everything is starting too hurt now, bursed shoulder and my thumb is fractured. Besided that and some cuts and a little mangled bike im 100% ok, thank God. Ill probably be the most defensive rider now haha
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Well rode for about 2 weeks now to work and back and was nothing but awesomeness. I was heading home today minding my own business bout to go on my favorite s curve in the road, 20 mph left 90 degree curve. I love to hit that going bout 25 mph and tip my bike and lay it down till the foot pegs drag. Anyway i was slowing down and started to lean into the curve when a car that i couldn't see cause of trees was driving in my lane! I then threw my bike the opposite way to the right and slammed on my brakes, went off the road lost control and tipped my over on the left and i rolled foward in a bean field. Another second sooner i would have been hit head on. The guy kept driving and didn't even stop, 6 people drove by and never stopped.... broken thumb i think, scrapes, broken turn signals, mirror, handle bar slightly bent, clutch lever bent, ans forks outta alignment. Coulda been alot worst...
Glad to hear you and the scoot are not banged up any worse dh.

So what did you learn from this incident?

You have to expect the unexpected when riding on public roads.
You are not going to try to tell me that you have never crossed a center line going around a curve while driving are you?

If you could not see all the way around the curve because of trees, you either need to slow down or change your "line" around that curve, so you can see farther into it before starting to turn in. David L. Hough refers to it as a "delayed apex", staying farther to the outside of the curve before starting your turn in. If you cannot safely stop in the distance you can see going around a curve, or topping a hill (sight distance), you are going too fast. When your sight distance starts to close up on you, get on your brakes--BOTH FRONT AND REAR, NOW!!

The difference between a crash and a clean get-a-way in most instances is about two seconds more reaction time according to some experts in the insurance industry.

I suggest that all riders, noobs as well as long time riders can all learn something from Hough's books on Proficient Motorcycling available in the link following.

http://www.amazon.com/David-L.-Hough/e/B001JOWE2I/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

I would like to make a suggestion to all members that when you report a crash or near miss, that you also ponder what you could have done differently to prevent the incident, and report your ideas for becoming a safer rider.

There was a middle aged couple killed on a motorcycle 5 miles from my home about 3 years ago, in what I consider to have been an easily preventable crash. They had been riding for several hours in a strong crosswind from Edmonton to Lethbridge, a distance of 320 miles or so. It would be reasonable to assume the driver was fatigued in both body and mind and not as responsive as he had been earlier in the ride home. They were only about 5 miles from home, a distance where many of us start to let our guard down because we know the area and start to think about what we need to do when we do get home.

This rider was on a two lane highway with a short divider fence but no median in between. He was in the left side tire track, and leaned over significantly to the left into the wind. Another rider alleges that he was also exceeding the speed limit by some unknown amount. An oncoming SUV started to make a left turn across the bike's path before seeing it and stopping. The bike and riders struck the drivers side front corner and were thrown some distance into the ditch.

The bike riders had the right of way. They were also the ones who died.

The SUV driver was in the wrong. (He is also a rider that I knew slightly from bike night. He was also traumatized by the hurt he had caused, and did not ride again for a long time.)

I contend that the rider should have recognized the danger potential of the left turning SUV facing him. If he had slowed down 10 mph pre-emptively and moved over 4-5 feet to the right hand tire track, I believe he would not have hit the SUV, and would still be alive today.

The horizontal movement of the bikes headlight those 4-5 feet may have been just enough to have caught the SUV drivers attention in time to stop him from rolling into the bikes path too. (google SMIDSY---Sorry Mate, I Didn't See You.)
 

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1986 VN750
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3,255 Posts
1: Glad you're OK

2: (unrelated to the crash, but in regards to sporty turning) don't push the bike down into a turn (like dirt bike riders do), you want to put your weight into the turn before the bike, thus why the sport bike guys lean off their bike. If you are scraping hard parts, you are at the bike's designed lean angle, and don't have much to go. It's unwise to ride at near-100% on the street, no mater what the skill level. If you are not riding at or near-100%, then you have time and space to react accordingly (most of the time). For street riding, a 'delayed apex' is suggested as well.

Read this if you have the time: http://www.cycleworld.com/2013/09/16/become-a-better-street-rider-with-the-pace-motorcycle-safety-and-riding-skills/

I went down on my VN too. Parking lot, pea sized gravel, and a overzealous u-turn. I broke my ankle for that one so glad you got off a bit lighter. A thumb is no fun.. though.

The center stand does a good job protecting the exhaust on that side of the bike! Saved mine from real damage.
 

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Dirt to road
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231 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
My crash was less then 2 miles from home so yeah i let my guard down cause i knew that curve very well. The first time i went on that curve on my bike i went like 5 mph lol i guess ive been just trying to push limit on the bike (see how low i can get it.) Ive been riding dirt for over 10 years and have alot of bad habits for the road. When i first started riding i always wanted to put my foot up in turns and the seat position was so different i keep putting my feet on imaginary pegs. Just a note this all happened before the curve, if it would have been 1 sec sooner and done what i usually do i probably would be dead from a head on collision. Im the type of person that learns the hardway, im going to be the most defensive rider now. Thanks for your input guys! Anyone have a left mirror?
 

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Super Moderator
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11,817 Posts
What they all said^

I always stay to the far far right in blind turns (left or right ones) as many times have met oncoming traffic crossing the yellow.
Thtanner is correct...riding at 100% on the street isn't very safe...especially on curves you can't see what's on the other side of.

A harsh way to learn this, but you're not dead :) and know better for the next time.
 

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2000 VN 750 Senior Member
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2,494 Posts
You survived and everything will be fixable including your thumb. That is the important stuff. Glad you got away with what you did do. Just don't get too overly defensive when you get back into riding. That will cause more problems. I still believe there are only two types of riders, those that crashed and those that are waiting to crash. You now got that out of the way and can ride a little more careful but still looses enough to enjoy the thrill of riding in the wind. If you haven't crashed yet then you are not putting enough miles on your bike.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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16,076 Posts
Glad to hear you and the scoot are not banged up any worse dh.

So what did you learn from this incident?

You have to expect the unexpected when riding on public roads.
You are not going to try to tell me that you have never crossed a center line going around a curve while driving are you?

If you could not see all the way around the curve because of trees, you either need to slow down or change your "line" around that curve, so you can see farther into it before starting to turn in. David L. Hough refers to it as a "delayed apex", staying farther to the outside of the curve before starting your turn in. If you cannot safely stop in the distance you can see going around a curve, or topping a hill (sight distance), you are going too fast. When your sight distance starts to close up on you, get on your brakes--BOTH FRONT AND REAR, NOW!!

The difference between a crash and a clean get-a-way in most instances is about two seconds more reaction time according to some experts in the insurance industry.

I suggest that all riders, noobs as well as long time riders can all learn something from Hough's books on Proficient Motorcycling available in the link following.

http://www.amazon.com/David-L.-Hough/e/B001JOWE2I/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

I would like to make a suggestion to all members that when you report a crash or near miss, that you also ponder what you could have done differently to prevent the incident, and report your ideas for becoming a safer rider.

There was a middle aged couple killed on a motorcycle 5 miles from my home about 3 years ago, in what I consider to have been an easily preventable crash. They had been riding for several hours in a strong crosswind from Edmonton to Lethbridge, a distance of 320 miles or so. It would be reasonable to assume the driver was fatigued in both body and mind and not as responsive as he had been earlier in the ride home. They were only about 5 miles from home, a distance where many of us start to let our guard down because we know the area and start to think about what we need to do when we do get home.

This rider was on a two lane highway with a short divider fence but no median in between. He was in the left side tire track, and leaned over significantly to the left into the wind. Another rider alleges that he was also exceeding the speed limit by some unknown amount. An oncoming SUV started to make a left turn across the bike's path before seeing it and stopping. The bike and riders struck the drivers side front corner and were thrown some distance into the ditch.

The bike riders had the right of way. They were also the ones who died.

The SUV driver was in the wrong. (He is also a rider that I knew slightly from bike night. He was also traumatized by the hurt he had caused, and did not ride again for a long time.)

I contend that the rider should have recognized the danger potential of the left turning SUV facing him. If he had slowed down 10 mph pre-emptively and moved over 4-5 feet to the right hand tire track, I believe he would not have hit the SUV, and would still be alive today.

The horizontal movement of the bikes headlight those 4-5 feet may have been just enough to have caught the SUV drivers attention in time to stop him from rolling into the bikes path too. (google SMIDSY---Sorry Mate, I Didn't See You.)
Smidsy an me are old friends
 

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Premium Member
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Happy you're not in the hospital although it may be wise to get checked out. Please ride safe.
 

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Bet that was scary. Glad you are ok. Sorry the cater didn't stop....or any cater for that matter.

Be careful. Always drive defensively. My ride to work is 4 lane all the way. I always assume no one sees me. And stay as far from vehicles when overtaking them. I just know that some idiot is gonna pull in front of me. It's happened before, it'll happen again.

Stay safe.
 

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Glad to know that you are ok! It could have been a lot worse. Wish you a speedy recovery and hope you get back on the roads soon. The only thing that makes me sad is the attitude of the passers by! How can they even do that!
 

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Overkill? Whats that?
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374 Posts
I've had that same senario play out about 3 times so far in the year and a half i've been riding. It's never a good situation to be in. I've been lucky that none of them have been completely in the lane as i've had 2 close shaves with helmet to mirror contact trying to keep the bike on the pavement. Ya make sure you leave enough on the table to be able to account for the unknown. I probably push harder than i should but there is still a healthy reserve for me to at least mitigate the damage.


But glad you are okish!
 
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