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Lebanon, NJ
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437 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Whew, what an ordeal! 11 hours each day, yesterday and today. I'm beat, I don't even want to look at my bike. I'm all motorcycled out for a few days.

BTY, I passed, 3 classmates did not. They were VERY tough during the evaluation/testing phase.
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
Great news Hiker !! Congrats on passing :beerchug: :rockon: :pepper:
And WOW, 11 hours a day, for 2 days !!?? :zzz: That in itself is quite a test
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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1,114 Posts
Congratulations!!!!......:D

That was easily the smartest move you (or any other biker) could make with your time, money and effort.

It will pay for itself time and again, later.

3 student washouts sounds about right. At least 2 washed out when I took the class.

Now ride about 6k to 10k miles and then take the MSF Experienced Rider Class.....:smiley_th
 

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Registered
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80 Posts
Indeed, MSF course was quite a meat grinder here in CO as well. Friday, 6-9:30PM, Saturday 7AM-9PM, sunday 7AM-7PM. Friday was theory only, saturday was theory till noon, then b.o.b. (butts on bikes). Sunday, first thing theory exam, then practice till ~5PM, then exams.

But to be honest, instructors were awesome - a work emergency had me up all night between sat and sun, so by the time ride exam came about sunday afternoon, I was so exhausted I simply refused to drive as fast as it was needed to meet timed objectives, not trusting my reflexes. Their response was to tell me to come back next saturday for more practice and retake the exam sunday, no additional fee... I was amazed and, of course, grateful.

Woot :)

Oh, and, congrats Hiker! I was pretty cocky about my riding skills before MSF class... and it was quite a humbling (and learning) experience. Well worth the time and money.
 

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48 Posts
Nice job Hiker, congrats!

Andro,
You got a lot more practice time than we did. We had the one night of class work, then a half day on the bikes and then more class work and the written test, then the next day did more drills, about 30 mins of practice, then we tested. I got exactly 2 times to practice doing the figure 8 in the box and it was the only thing I lost points on. I was disappointed, but the instructor said, what's more important- knowing how to brake and swerve, or ride in a box? I got the 2nd highest score in the class on the riding part. I think everyone who stuck with the course passed. We had 2-3 people drop out after the 1st riding day. A couple bike dumps will do that I guess!
 

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Lebanon, NJ
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437 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yea, the freaking box! I hated that box. I was able to negotiate the left hand part without leaving the box, but always screwed up the right-hand part - left the box. Ughh. I also lost points on stopping distance, I felt like I was coming to screaming stop. Go figure. It was a learning experience for sure; especially the one rider/coach shouting: "Turn Your Freaking Head!" all day long.

Ha, I feel good now though. Went to motor vehicle yesterday and got the M endorsement to add to my many others. Only moped is missing I think.
 

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HAWK
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2,576 Posts
I also took the course, I had a perfect score on the riding test and only missed one on the written(I filled in the wrong box).
I was happy.
 

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80 Posts
Heh... my class was definitely fun...

First weekend, I got to practice on a nice little 250cc Suzuki... cruiser-style low rider, really low g-center, stable like an anvilll beauty. Then, I show up next weekend to re-do the test, and only bike available is some motocross-style thing higher than most horses I've ever seen. Just sitting on it felt like ballancing on a pin. Fortunately, I discovered that it gets excessively stable at higher speeds (higher in training course terms). End result? I aced practical test on it, simply because I was freaking out about falling over if I drove too slowly. And because of high G-center, counterweight steering in 8-box allowed for some crazy-tight turns. Last (but not least) I had to re-do emergency stop portion because I did the approach too fast, snapped the brake like a maniac, and actually stood the bike on the front wheel. For a moment, all I could think of was 'uh oh... I'm about to kiss the pavement' before bike slowly settled down as I eased on the brake.

Woot! I need to take that course again :)
 

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1992 Vulcan 750
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69 Posts
How long should someone wait before considering the MSF Experienced Rider Course? If I remember my Basic Rider Course correctly, they said to wait about a year. But what if you don't ride until almost a year later? That's what's happened in my case, I got a motorcycle 10 months after the course. And, I've checked my county's offerings and they're not teaching the ERC for the rest of this year, anyway.
 

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HAWK
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2,576 Posts
I would say about 500 to 600 mies, I think that was one of the requirments.
1 Year or 500 miles, I might be wrong but that sounds good.
 

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Registered
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80 Posts
How long should someone wait before considering the MSF Experienced Rider Course? If I remember my Basic Rider Course correctly, they said to wait about a year. But what if you don't ride until almost a year later?
That's pretty much what happened to me - due to work travel, I barely got couple hundred miles done last year after MSF course... so I scheduled a MSF refresher course for this summer, hoping to rake in more miles and do Experienced Course sometime in the autumn.

The way I see it... you really can't have too many miles in the saddle under watchful eye of someone telling you what and how to correct...
 

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Senior Lurker
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509 Posts
Hi guys. Congrats to all that have taken the course!

Let me share some observations with you as a former Instructor / Rider Coach. <Let me stress that these are my opinions and not those of the MSF so they don't sue me.>

The Experienced Rider Course (ERC) is a one day MSF class taught on the same range that you took your Basic Rider Course (BRC) on. The only differences are that you ride your own bike and the maximum speeds are 5-10 mph faster. The recommended ~500 miles or first riding season is so that you have some time to get used to riding and used to the way your own bike handles so that you can be taught how to ride it better. What's the point of you becoming a better GZ250 rider if you normally ride a VN750? If you normally ride with a passenger, you should have them take the ERC with you.

The ERC goes a little more in depth on traction management and staying within the limits of traction on your bikes than the BRC did. It covers the three basic skills that the Hurt Report found were lacking among motorcyclists, the ability to stop quickly, the ability to take turns properly (Slow <before the turn>, Look <turn your head, keep your eyes level and look through the turn to where you want the bike to go!>, Press <press on the right grip to go right, press on the left grip to go left> and Roll <on the throttle through the turn>) and the ability to swerve. It will also go over street strategies briefly again, like proper riding gear, making yourself and your bike more visible, riding sober etc., etc.

The other point of having students wait a year to take an ERC, is so that after taking the Winter months off from riding and letting your skills get rusty, you take a refresher course to sharpen your skills in time for the Spring riding season.

If you want to take an ERC, start by looking up your local motorcycle schools that are approved to teach the MSF curriculum on msf-usa.org and calling them up. Many schools do not offer the course on a regular basis, so remember that since the schools are independent businesses and want to do business, if you can get a group of 10 to 12 motorcyclists together the school will be much more likely to offer the class to your group.

In New York the successful completion of the BRC will give you four points off of your license, the waiver to DMV motorcycle road test, 10% off of your car insurance for three years and 10% off of your motorcycle insurance for three years (it counts as the “5 hour” class in NY for DMV purposes). The ERC also gives you 10% off of your motorcycle insurance for three years (not cumulative on top of the BRC discount). Taking the ERC every few years will help keep your street skills sharp and help keep your insurance costs down.

FYI, the Instructor Prep Workshop (IPW) to become an Instructor / Rider Coach, is only good for 10% off motorcycle insurance too.
 
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