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OK, you guys scared the crap out of me so I did my final drive splines yesterday . . . and boy am I glad I did! THANKS!

Mine is a '99 with only 5,000 miles on it. When I took it down I found that the front splines had NO SIGN OF ANY GREASE AT ALL, and the rear splines had a minimum amount. No way was there 17 ml of grease in there at any time! Fortunately for me, the gal I bought the bike from (two weeks ago) had never used it in the rain and had kept it in a garage. There was a little bit of rust inside the female part of the rear spline, but the splines themselves looked very good. Mirror-like finish on them actually.

When taking it apart I carefully marked the relative position of the splines with a Sharpie marker, and then when it was out I used a diamond hone to polish a shiny spot where the marks were, this way I was able to clean everything up (I used toluene for cleaning) and still have marks for indexing the splines back the same way. I basically did everything as described above except for three things.

First, I used Krytox grease from Locktite. This cost about $36 for two ounces (more than enough for the job) and I have got to say . . . this stuff looks very good!

Second, after getting as much Krytox in the front splines as I could, I sprayed the entire propeller shaft and universal joint with a good anti-corrosion spray. I sprayed from the front and the back and was careful to hit all the inside surfaces. I don’t like rust in my bike. I have had excellent luck with “Corrosion Pro” (LubriMatic brand) on marine engines in salt water, so it should work in there.

Third, I made a bead of Krytox grease around the flange of the propeller drive tube (where the four bolts go) and mushed it when I put the final drive housing back on in an attempt to seal this surface against water. Does Kawasaki have any engineers? Why the hell isn’t there an O-ring groove and an O-ring so water can’t get in and ruin our day? I tried to do the same thing with the rubber boot up front . . . but who knows. The fact that we are all having these problems is just plain BAD ENGINEERING followed by BAD EXECUTION of their bad engineering! And damn easy to fix, if they would bother.

Anyway, I think I’m set on this one for a while. Hope this helps someone.

Bill
 

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The front portion of the splines aren't as critical since there is minimal movement there. Usually a good spray of lithium sparay is all that they need. Also I am not sure of the content Krytox grease. Is it a Moly compound? Moly is the specified grease for the rear splines and Honda Moly is the most widely used
 

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BillyDoc said:
OK, you guys scared the crap out of me so I did my final drive splines yesterday . . . and boy am I glad I did! THANKS!

......When taking it apart I carefully marked the relative position of the splines with a Sharpie marker, and then when it was out I used a diamond hone to polish a shiny spot where the marks were, this way I was able to clean everything up (I used toluene for cleaning) and still have marks for indexing the splines back the same way. I basically did everything as described above except for three things.

First, I used Krytox grease from Locktite. This cost about $36 for two ounces (more than enough for the job) and I have got to say . . . this stuff looks very good!

Second, after getting as much Krytox in the front splines as I could, I sprayed the entire propeller shaft and universal joint with a good anti-corrosion spray. I sprayed from the front and the back and was careful to hit all the inside surfaces. I don’t like rust in my bike. I have had excellent luck with “Corrosion Pro” (LubriMatic brand) on marine engines in salt water, so it should work in there.

Third, I made a bead of Krytox grease around the flange of the propeller drive tube (where the four bolts go) and mushed it when I put the final drive housing back on in an attempt to seal this surface against water. Does Kawasaki have any engineers? Why the hell isn’t there an O-ring groove and an O-ring so water can’t get in and ruin our day? I tried to do the same thing with the rubber boot up front . . . but who knows. The fact that we are all having these problems is just plain BAD ENGINEERING followed by BAD EXECUTION of their bad engineering! And damn easy to fix, if they would bother.

Anyway, I think I’m set on this one for a while. Hope this helps someone.

Bill
Bill..sounds like you did an excellent job. Krytox is great stuff.
No gasket?? No O-ring??? LOL....
That's what you get when you buy a $6000 bike. ;)
FWIW, I dabbed a little black RTV on those mating surfaces...Krytox, or even Moly, is WAY to expensive to use there.

Gotta disagree on the bad, bad, bad part....
It's more like 'simple, simple, simple....' followed by 'maintenance, maintenance, maintenance...'.
IF, and I say IF, the system is lubed properly when it is built at the factory, which IIRC was/is the source of many problems, if you check it at 6000mi as Kaw recommends (and not enough owners/dealers do), and then get on a regular maintenance schedule (10k miles for me) I think you will find the driveline will last a long time.
You definitely improved on the original design tho....typical of us riders, no???
 

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Hello John et al,
Do any parts have to be purchased, besides the Moly, to do the job? Are any gaskets, O-rings, etc. necessary to get from the dealer before beginning this project. Sounds like I'd better check mine. I have about 8500 miles on the Vulcan750. I really love the motorcycle and want it to last. I don't know how much confidence one should place in the shops to do the job right so I'd better try it myself.

By the way, is the Vulcan stable enough on the center stand while doing the job? I thought of maybe tying ropes and fastening them to the ceiling to make it more secure and stable during the procedure. What precautions does everyone else take to prevent their Vulcans from falling over? I would hate to scratch or dent my the Vulcan.
Thanks,
Sam612
 

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hey.... you can get the o rings at a dealer... but u only really need them if urs are worn or cut. make sure us use a toothbrush to get the moly into the splines good. dont forget the front as well.

I did mine in the parking lot at my apt.. took about an hour and a half.... there is a vulcan verse that is step by step and worked great. u will need a breaker bar to break that subborn rear axle nut though ( i got a big 12in adj cresent for the job at Home depot.). also if you are a smaller person you may want an extra hand. that wheel is about 50-70 lbs. and its tough to get the shocks back on.
 

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Sam612,

The center stand will do fine. You may want to use a strap hooked to the center stand and someplace forward on the bike to prevent it from coming off of the center stand
 

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Thank you all for your responses to my questions regarding the spline lube job. Today I went to the Kawasaki website and looked at the parts diagram (a tip from Flap1) and ordered all the O-Rings listed. I really do not know which ones I will need and I did not want to be unable to ride while waiting for an O-Ring because I did not "shotgun" order them. The total came came to about $36 including the shipping charges. Who knows, I may not evan need any but it is insurance. Watch me need something else. Oh well, gotta try to do the job.
See ya,
Sam612
 

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Did the driveshaft spline lube this morning

Hi Everybody,
Thanks for the good input regarding lubricating the spline on the driveshaft. I did mine this morning. I am happy to report that it really did not appear to need it, but I am very glad that I checked it and lubed it. I own a '98 Vulcan 750, Black and Candy Wine Red with 8200 miles. A really great color scheme. The new 2006 Vulcan 750's look much the same but the covers on the '98 are chrome versus black on the 2006. There are some color schemes that I like a bit better such as the 2003 red and grey and, I think, the '95's dark red and red combination.

Anyway, there was plenty of grease on the spline that connects to the differential. I did not check the front yet but plan on doing that soon by slipping the rubber up a bit and peeking in, as was described in this forum. One thing that puzzles me is the grease on the spline was very dark, very close to a black color. The Honda Moly 60 paste was grey. Did I get the right paste? Sure hope so.

The good news is the job was easier than I suspected. I tied the Vulcan to the rafters so that it would not fall over plus tied the center stand to the front wheel to prevent it from folding when applying pressure to the spring loaded shaft during reassembly (thanks for that tip Dianna) which tends to push the Vulcan forward.

So, that's done and I am a happy Vulcan 750 owner.
Bye for now,
Sam612
 

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I to decided it was time to take a look at my splines. I have an 05 and at first thought I would not need to check it for a while until I started reading here about folks finding some of the newer bikes had not been lubricated at the factory. Glad I did it. The front splines had no grease and very little on the rear splines. Showed some signs of wear. I lubed both the front and rear splines with the honda moly. Not near as bad a job as I thought it was going to be. It took about two hours altogether. Thanks for all the tips.
 

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Allrighty..

This subject looks serious, so I really need to ask... What are those splines everyone is talking about? I'm a computer geek, not too engineering-savvy, but from what I'm reading, these spliney thingies are apparently quite important thingamabobs.

Any way to check if they're in good condition / greased by visual inspection, without dissasembly? My Vulcan is '94, and I'm guessing lack of greasing over 12-year period might be a painful issue?
 

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Andro said:
Allrighty..

This subject looks serious, so I really need to ask... What are those splines everyone is talking about? I'm a computer geek, not too engineering-savvy, but from what I'm reading, these spliney thingies are apparently quite important thingamabobs.

Any way to check if they're in good condition / greased by visual inspection, without dissasembly? My Vulcan is '94, and I'm guessing lack of greasing over 12-year period might be a painful issue?
The splines are on the drive shaft where it enters the final drive. Wheel and final drive has to come off to see them. There are splines on the hub where it connects to the wheel. These can be seen when the wheel comes off. They're not the splines that fail. If you have a mechanic check it out. Make super clear which splines you're worried about. Better yet, check them yourself. It's not hard, you just have to have a plan how to remove the wheel. The final drive is only held on by four bolts that are visible on the front of the drive.
 

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Gotta check the 2006 spline. Should have kept the 2005 which was a fine Vulcan and the new owner is very happy with it. That is a good thing. Hate to sell someone anything that gives them a problem. Oh well, here we go again. Checking the spline for grease. Did it on the 98, the 05 and now gonna do it on the 06. The first two were fine but, of course, I applied a fresh coat of Moly60 anyway. Little effort for piece of mind. Doggone that Lincoln, NE assembly line. Why such poor quality control?
 

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welcome back sam long time gone i see you should stick around this time we would love to see some of the older members come back and teach the newer crowd how you kept these bikes rolling for so long
 
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