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Looks like TOC is gone.

There's a lot of these on eBay in different colors.

 

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That’s basically what I got. I don’t recall the brand, but they are blue. Got them for about 20 bucks on eBay.
I'd just get another bolt, they aren't anything special. Must have been a defective bolt, should be able to turn those adjusters without much force.
 

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TOC isn't gone. An old link on this site pointed to page that isn't there anymore, but his domain is still there.


There's no mention of VN700/VN750 on his new site, so I called and left a VM. He VM'd me back and said everything on his site is for VN700/VN750. He just had his site rebuilt and didn't realize the new version didn't mention VN750, and that he'd look into making that clearer.

I just bought two this afternoon, since I think my ACCT's might be going bad. She's knocking at 4500rpm under load.
Yup, good to know. I searched with Google and hit links from the search results, they kept coming up with errors.
 

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I have to agree with the "do it yourself" option. I reused my original ACCT components and followed the procedure described in this forum by Wolfie (RIP). I also added some extra material around the "plunger" so it was more rigid. I wrapped strips of aluminum around the inside of the housing, where the spring was before I removed it. That limited the movement of the plunger that rides on the chain. Mine have been running longer than I can remember and have only been adjusted maybe twice. I do not really like the design of the ones shown above in this post. The flat end that rides on the chain just does not seem like a good point of contact for the moving chain. No matter how hard it is I can only see either (1) the flat end riding on the chain wearing down quickly or (2) the hardened flat end wearing the chain prematurely. The rounded end of the original ACCT seems more chain friendly.
If it's an mcct the plunger shouldn't be moving.

The flat end doesn't ride on the chain, it presses on the chain guide.
 

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Rather than start yet another thread, I figure I can ask about this here seeing my question is about cam tensioners. Specifically it's about page 4-11 in the PDF manual we use and the correct procedure for reinstalling the OEM automatic tensioners. It mentions "resetting" the spring plunger, using a screwdriver etc. Or else bad things happen.
Oops!

Ok, so what happens if I didn't follow that advice?

I'm asking because in the course of installing my MCCTs last spring, I went back and forth on the front cylinder. I wasn't sure I liked the way the front one sounded with the MCCT at first so I put the auto back on there for a while. Recently I took it back off and reinstalled the MCCT.

It's been running fine, but since coming across this jarring bit of info in the manual, a dark cloud - indeed, one might say an "Ominous Darkness" - has eclipsed my well-being.
It's probably fine if it hasn't self destructed by now. If you're still running the acct you can still do the reset, right?
 

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Well, it did take some effort to reinstall the ACCT when I did it early in the season. At the time I just figured the pressure was the result of the spring pushing against the chain guide.

So please help me understand what might have happened instead, and why it needs to be "reset". Does the spring somehow get locked in the extended position once it's removed? If so, why? What sense does that make engineering-wise?

Both of the MCCTs are installed now and have been for the past few months. I still have both of the autos in a ziplock. But I'm worried about that front cylinder because when I went to tighten the MCCT on it yesterday, I kept winding it in without effect. I kept expecting to meet more resistance; maybe even make the idle drop (which happened the first time I dialed them in) but nothing happened. I didn't dare keep going so I quit and called it a night. I still don't dare actually. But it's bugging me no end wondering if I really effed something up in there.
If the tensioner was too tight the chain might wear a bit more on the chain guide. The guide is aluminum with a rubber coating, heavier where the chain rides.
 
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