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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know everyone always mentions to use anti-sieze on the MC caps screws so they don't have to be drilled out. However I checked my fluid level in late April and had to use a impact driver to remove my screws. I definitely used anti-sieze on the threads. Last week my son's brakes were feeling soft so he went to check the level and the soft screws got the best of him on one screw so I had to drill it out. We replaced the screws with black oxide screws that had a torx head top. We both liked the look so I went to change mine. They were only .50 each at Ace.

Even though it had only been a couple of months and I know they were installed right, one screw barely made it out even with the impact driver. I am pretty sure the taper of the screw head was the issue. After drilling the screw top off on my son's cap I was able to unscrew the remaining screw with my fingers. No pliers at all. Plus the threads look fine, exactly like the good screw's threads. I read back posts and found that was not uncommon. This time I applied a dab of anti-sieze under the top of the screw top on the tapered portion of the screw thinking perhaps that is where the problem was. I am not a fan of the aluminum screws and hope the oxide coating doesn't cause a problem with the threads in the MC. When I drilled the top off my son's the black paint was still present in the tapered portion of his MC (It is probably anodized and not painted but whatever coating was used it was present.)

I am definately going to check them regularly from now on. Since I need new front pads I know they will get checked again in a few weeks for sure.
 

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The key to saving the factory screws might be a JIS screwdriver. JIS ... Japanese Industry Standard

I have one of these (stubby with multiple heads), definitely makes a difference. I was able to get the outside stator plate right off. There’s no play in the head at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would say that if you have a Japanese vehicle you should invest in JIS screwdrivers. Not cheap ones either. Get a good set from a good company. Probably not HF. (I don't know if Harbor Freight even sells JIS stuff, but a ruined screw is not worth the pennies saved on a cheap screwdriver.) I know there are lots of online articles that say you can modify a normal Phillips screwdriver to use but unless you have incredible machinist skills it ends up just being a modified Phillips head screwdriver and will not work the same. (They will work on already loosened screws though and can help in putting things back together faster.)

Oddly, I am unable to tell if the original MC screws have the dimple that identifies a JIS screw. Either way that was the reason my son was unable to remove his without damage. (That was also one reason why switching to a torx head screw appealed to me.)I even bought a special impact set (on Amazon that I hate) for JIS screws.

You know the saying about the right tool for the job. My problem is I have so many tools it is hard to keep them where they belong. That can be problem for someone who is in a hurry and may not remember where I told him the "JIS" tools live.
 

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I’m not against getting good tools, I have more than my limited space can hold as it is. In the case of the JIS I didn’t go over board. I got this stubby with the No2 & 3 size heads.
It did the job and it’s been in the bag since.

VESSEL Ratchet Stubby Screwdriver [No.TD-6700W-23] (Ph No.2/No.3) (Japan Import) https://a.co/d/0vMin8q
 
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