Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Love My Baby
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Been riding on my newly installed Pirelli's and now I can honestly say that these tires are great! The dealer inflated them to 40 psi in the rear, 35 psi up front, and I wasn't convinced that I was getting the traction I expected. Now I'm keeping 35 psi in the rear, 30 psi up front and man-o-man does that make a difference! I can't seem to slip or loose traction no matter how I ride (been testing them a bit by riding more aggressively than I normally do).

Paid $82.50 plus tax for the front and $120.49 plus tax for the rear. Not the absolute cheapest (Bike Bandit had the best price) but by buying from this shop I only paid $40 for both tires to be installed & balanced, making the total price better than getting them off the internet and paying rip-off prices for installation, which I couldn't do myself right now.

Compared pricing, tread patterns and user reviews for the stock Bridgestone, Dunlop, Metzeler and the Pirelli. Chose the Pirelli MT66 Route and now I can say I'm glad I did.
View attachment 2485 View attachment 2486 View attachment 2487 View attachment 2488
.Bridgestone ...Dunlop ..Metzeler .....Pirelli
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
Glad you like them. It will be interesting to see what kind of mileage you get out of them. I have the Metzler ME880s, and have them inflated to 40 psi in the rear, and 35 psi in the front. I'm convinced they last longer that way, and for a cruiser/touring bike, tread life is the most important consideration when getting tires. Now a sportbike would be different. Jerry.
 

·
The Professor
Joined
·
3,147 Posts
Tire pressure is the key for tread wear and traction, use the tire mfgr. suggested pressure as a guide and not the reccomended pressure thats on the bike. Kawasaki's reccomendation has not change since 85' for the VN but the tire making process and compounds have made leaps and bounds.

Altitude, temperature and load play a major part in tire performance, if you pay close attention to the tire itself it will tell you. Every couple hundred miles or so look closely at the tread wear. If the outer edges are worn more than the center you are under inflated, if the center is worn more the the outer edges you are over inflated.

This is a basic giudline for normal driving, your own dirving style will add or subtract from the average life of the tire. Constantly check pressure and wear pattern for maximun tire life and performance.
 

·
Love My Baby
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Good advice. I've been unable to find Pirelli's recommended PSI other than their stated max PSI of 42, for max loads. I just experimented a bit to find what I thought "felt" best. But I'll keep a close watch on the treadwear and will re-adjust accordingly.

Thanks...
 

·
Undercover Sportbiker
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Good advice. I've been unable to find Pirelli's recommended PSI other than their stated max PSI of 42, for max loads. I just experimented a bit to find what I thought "felt" best. But I'll keep a close watch on the treadwear and will re-adjust accordingly.

Thanks...
That's about the best way to go. The OEM pressures are for the tires they put on the bike. Replacement tires of a different brand will hjave different characteristics. For my style of riding and my weight, I run higher than OEM pressures on my sport bikes, but again, I have better tires than OEM, and they handle waaaaay different too. Sometimes it takes a while to dial in, and of course, some tires are better at giving feedback than others. Pirelli is very good at that.

Jerry - tread life is also important for the majority of sport bike riders. $300 plus per set kinda make it "not optional" IMO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
The difference to me, is that traction is way more important on a sportbike, when you are leaned way over dragging the pegs in turns. Most cruisers/touring bikes are not ridden that way, they spend most of their time straight up, or barely leaned over. My VN750 handles curves great, but there is no way I would push it anywhere near as far as a sportbike.

Sportbike tires are ridiculously expensive, and short lived, because they have to be made out of a softer compound for maximum traction. It's just the price sportbike riders pay.


There is no real reason that you could not make motorcycle tires that would last just as long as car tires (40,000+), except that they wouldn't be safe. Motorcycles lean over in curves and corners, cars don't.

With my own weight, plus all the accessories I've added, plus all the stuff I carry on trips, I'm pretty close to the Vulcan 750s load limit. Thats part of the reason I inflate the rear tire to the maximum psi shown on the sidewall. A good part of that weight is on the rear tire. I usually inflate the front tire a little less, to give me more traction when braking hard. Front tires are also quite a bit cheaper and easier to install than rear tires. Jerry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I have been riding for about 2 years on Pirelli's MT66 tires (about 15,000 miles) and been running about 32 psi front / 34 psi rear. I'm about 210 lb. and if I run them any lower I feel that the ride is too squishy (for my liking) but it seems to me that this tires like to be on the high side of air pressure. As for tread life the front seem to be half way but the rear looks like new so I expect the front to give me about 5,000 to 8,000 miles more while the rear most likely would double that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
I guess I will try these tires next, but I have a lot of miles left in my Metzlers. I always slightly overinflate my tires, they seem to last longer. I thought I was doing good to get 20,000 miles out of my stock Bridgestones.


I have always mounted and balanced my own tires, I don't trust a shop to do it. I don't want my wheels scratched, and I want them balanced better than most shops do it. Jerry.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top