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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
There were two fatalities in a motorcycle crash yesterday afternoon about 5 miles from my home. The names of a man aged 46 and his wife age 45 were just released on the TV news, but I did not know them.

A member of the local bike forum is the author of the following report. Note that even though there was an SUV that turned left in front of the bike, the rider made some poor decisions positioning himself too close to the center divider so that neither he nor the cage driver were clearly visible to each other. This is an odd intersection with a left turn lane on a 2 lane road that has divider with 4 or 5' tall posts with large reflector boards attached that are the root cause of the limited visibility in this accident.

It is very common for riders to instantly blame the cager for any event involving a motorcycle.

In this instance witnesses have stated that the bike, (a late model Harley bagger) was traveling at an excessive speed.
The bike was in the far left of the his lane, along the center guardrail (heading south on Hwy 25) at the corner of Hwy 25, and the left turn lane, to access hwy 3 towards Coalhurst.
There were extremely strong easterly wind gusts at the time.
Because of the position of the bike, visibility for both the SUV, and the bike was limited.
The bike did not see the SUV, there were no skid marks to indicate braking.
The bike hit the very center of the front of the SUV.

It is very important to ride defensively.
This means in this instance the bike should be in the far right of his lane to offer the best visibility for himself, and to see any oncoming traffic, particularly where there is a left turn lane.

I was there immediately after the event.
I did not recognize the bike as anyone I knew.
Many of you know the driver of the SUV, he is a fellow rider, who takes great pains to drive/ride defensively.
Many of us are relatively new riders and it would be easy to make the same kind of mistakes regarding not positioning yourself in the lane to be most visible to other drivers. Take the time to educate yourself and think about the best lane positions for different situations. Generally speaking, you are safest and most visible when you are positioned farthest away from a potential danger approaching from one side of the road or the other.

Stay safe and keep scanning continually folks.
 

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Patriot Guard Rider
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825 Posts
Pegs Down _/\_
 

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Big Dumb Viking
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597 Posts
What is a "Harley Bagger"?

Sorry to hear about another rider down though... :(
 

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Patriot Guard Rider
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825 Posts
What is a "Harley Bagger"?

Sorry to hear about another rider down though... :(
This refers to a Harley Davidson motorcycle which has luggage capacity including at least a pair of saddlebags and, optionally, a topbox or trunk, a pillion bag, tank bags, etc...
 

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Premium Member
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1,126 Posts
Pegs down and thanks for the post. I am doing everything i can to be seen including hi vis gear and reflective decals. Headlight mod and just got my edition of more proficient motorcycling.
 

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Trying to be Seen

I sure hate to hear of an accident like that. I keep thinking that I am to old for this but I love riding that bike. All you guys take care. Thank you Old Hoss we need to be reminded once in a while.

Mcneuby
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
What is a "Harley Bagger"?
Sorry to hear about another rider down though... :(
This refers to a Harley Davidson motorcycle which has luggage capacity including at least a pair of saddlebags and, optionally, a topbox or trunk, a pillion bag, tank bags, etc...
X2^^^^^^^^^

Judging from the shape of the batwing fairing, this bike was an ElectraGlide.
Also sometimes known as a "Geezer Glide", or an "old man`s bike". ;)
 

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On His Lady Vulcan
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1,647 Posts
Its sad to hear about things like this, a simple mistake and *POOF* Then you get a kid like the one we had near my place yesterday that decides to go 105mph on a two lane road during heavy traffic and *POOF* He goes sailing 440 feet like some super hero of sorts. He was just 24 yrs old. Sad yes but more his fault than a absent minded mistake from the Harley rider and his passenger.
 

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I'm always sad to hear about anyone dying in a motorcycle wreck. I wrote a research paper for a college class a couple of years ago about the top three common factors in motorcycle traffic fatalities. I started my research assuming that helmet-less riders or lack of safety gear, or left turning automobiles in front of bikers, would be the most significant factors, but my research revealed that the top three common factors were: 1. Excessive speed by the biker, 2. Elevated blood alcohol level by the biker and 3. Not licensed for motorcycle operation. Which are all factors that the biker has control over. The last, no MC License might seem strange, but I think it implies that the person operating the bike failed to ever get any specific motorcycle training and thus the proper licensing. In most places you at least have to show some ability to perform basic riding skills and pass some sort of written test to get a MC endorsement on your license.
 

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Super Moderator
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Sounds like some real bad traffic planning....building blind spots for oncoming traffic. Some would get sued for that here.

Again, an unfortunate example to show why one needs to pay attention and Slow Down when approaching an intersection.

I have always felt that most accidents involving a car and a bike can usually be traced to bad judgement on the rider... Not the car driver. The reason being that we all know they are out to kill us...so we should not rely on them to save us ... But ourselves.

Jumping in a tank of sharks is dangerous ... Just don't blame the shark for biting you.

KM
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
This is an odd intersection with a left turn lane on a 2 lane road that has divider with 4 or 5' tall posts with large reflector boards attached that are the root cause of the limited visibility in this accident.
Sounds like some real bad traffic planning....building blind spots for oncoming traffic. Some would get sued for that here.KM
My memory of this intersection was somewhat faulty when I wrote the previous post yesterday. I drove out there today to get another look at the accident scene. The tall reflector posts are only at the end of the dividers, not running down the whole length of it, as I had remembered it.

The divider is about 2 feet high and has amber colored, rectangular reflectors about 6 or 8 inches tall attached to the top of it every 25 feet or so. The view is not obstructed as much as I originally believed, but the bike would still have been considerably concealed when he was riding so close to the guardrail. However the motorcycle rider should have been able to see the oncoming SUV, IMO.

I believe the driver may have experienced the "LOOMING" symptom described in this video. The Australian and Brit riders use an acronym, "SMIDSY", which stands for "Sorry Mate, I Didn`t See You". Take a look at this video and see if there is anything we can learn about staying more visible.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqQBubilSXU
 
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