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Discussion Starter #1
Ok,

So I have read through much of the forum including much of the verses as well as the 10 things for new 750 riders, or is it 10 things for new riders, or the 15 things for old riders coming back or whatever it is called. :)

Anyway, here is where I am at and I would like some suggestions.

'91 VN750 21.5K miles

First off - Defenite will do list

1. Once over with torque wrench on all nuts
2. Oil Change & Filter
3. Radiator Fluid change
4. SPLINE LUBE (I finally figured out what this is!!!)
5. Battery (Unfortunately I just put in a brand new battery before I heard about these maintenance free ones, guess that's for next spring)
6. New Plugs and Air Filter
7. Drain Gas and check Tank for Rust. (Replace gas filter)
8. Brake fluid change (is this really necessary)


Secondly (This is where I would like some suggestions / comments)

Bike backfires a bit, also seems to take a second or two to come down to normal idle speeds after throttling up. PO thinks the carbs need to be cleaned. I didn't notice any issues with throttle cable, but I will admit I don't entirely know what to look for.

So, having said that, I read somewhere on here, easy first, hard second.
Initially I was just planning on pulling and cleaning carbs, now I have ammended this to:

1. SeaFoam treatment (trying to find some more details about exactly how to do this) or GUMOUT in carbs. (preference?)
2. Synch Carbs before trying to clean to see if that helps
3. If all else fails pull carbs and clean.


Finally, question about the tires

Front tire needs to be replaced, too much dry rot for my taste.
Rear tire looks good.
Should I change both? I would rather not since I am working on a limited budget.
Furthermore, I read somewhere about changing tire size, is this a good idea, and can I start this process by only changing the front tire first and the rear at a later date, or do these need to be changed together.



Thanks guys
 

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First... Seafoam in the tank.. sounds like the carbs need a good cleaning..run about half a cup in the tank with a full tnak of gas.. and everytime you fill up there after put a cap full or 2 in it.. wont hurt anything at all.
2nd.. lube the cables.. cupple of good write ups on how to do this.. baggie trick works great.
3rd.. SPLINE LUDE for sure. and since you need to replace tires it would be a great time to do this... and yes don't wait on those tires.. they are the only thing holding you up on the bike!....also take the tires off yourself and have the rubber mounted at a shop.. it will save you some bucks....this is a good place to order tires from
http://www.jakewilson.com/cart.do
tire size is up to you really.. most will argue with me on this one...LOL
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Welcome...
As for the new MF battery next spring, I would run it till there was a suspect problem, should last +/-3 yrs...
Good call on trying the SeaFoam first, a few ounces (+/- 1/3 can) in the tank for a few tanks may be all that is needed... Might also consider marbling the carbs., that might help a bit with the backfire...
Surely replace the dry rotting front tire, I prefered the 110/90/19 over the 100/90/19...
Plus it will almost correct up the speedometer...
I see no need to change both at the same time, unless both need changing, I only get 8-9k out of my rear tire, but usually get 12-14k out of the front...
But listen to other folks on here they usually know more than me as I really didn't have that many problems with mine...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Check the date code on the rear tire. Over time, the composition of the rubber degrades. If the tire is 5 yrs. or over, take it easy while riding until you can afford to replace it. Tires are critical to safety on a bike. When you replace them, I would recommend the oversized Rear 170/80/R15, and the oversized front 110/90/R19. Have a good one, and always consider safety the best investment for your money.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Don't forget electrical.. Clean as many connections as you can..
 

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Plastic safe electrical contact spray works well for those hard to reach places. Available at most auto parts stores and Radio Shack. Once clean, apply a little dielectric grease and reconnect.
 

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Brake fluid should be changed every two years. It absorbs moisture over time. Water does not compress like brake fluid does and this can lead to mushy braking.

Hey, it's cheap life insurance if you ask me. Bleeding the brakes is easy and the cost of fluid is probably less than $8 a bottle. I believe you want to use DOT4 fluid, double check what the top of the brake reservoir says. NEVER mix DOT types of brake fluid, only the type listed for your bike.

When bleeding the brakes be careful not to let any air get into the system. Air doesn't compress the same way brake fluid does and any air bubble in the lines will also lead to mushy brakes.

-Sloppy
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Check.

Clean electrical connections and change brake fluid.

I thought about things and decided to go with replacing both tires with oversized ones.

I got Front Bridgestone Splitfire 110/90-19 and rear Shinko 230 Tour Master170/80-15 plus a 90 degree valve stem from jakewilson.com for only $135 and free shipping. (I tried to get a matching set of Shinko 230 but they were out of stock on the front tire and don't expect more till October, so I hope this mix and match is not a bad thing)

It has been recommended that I remove the tires myself and bring them to the shop for mounting and balancing only. Two questions regarding this.

1) Based on what I read in Fergy's spline Lube tutorial about removing the rear tire; is it enough to get the tire changed, or do I need to go an extra step and remove something else from the rear wheel (rear brake?)

2) I did not notice a posting on Front Tire removal, but I am sure it is here somewhere and in my service manuals, but I am curious how I would get both wheels off at the same time. I feel like a floor jack under the center of the bike probably won't provide enough stability to remove the fromt wheel after the rear is already off. And shouls I remove the rear while on the center stand then jack the bike up, or jack the bike off the ground first before removing either tire. I feel like I am missing a key point here.

Its funny, I used to think I knew so much about this stuff, but after looking around here for a while I realize I am a novice at best.

Thanks again guys, If it weren't for all of you I would be spending way more than I wanted to to get my bike road ready, and probably not even be able to afford to get it going this year at all.
 

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You are correct to assume a tedious balance with the center stand and floor jack approach, this is how I did it also.

Removing and installing the rear wheel is slightly easier when the bike is slightly higher than the center stand normally raises it. I used a piece of 2x4 under the center stand to get better clearance from the ground in the rear. I think a 1x4 would have been sufficient. Much more force is required to get the bike on the center stand when using a board under it (it changes the angle of incidence to the fulcrum action of the center stand). Be prepared for it, and see how the weight feels once, before yanking it up there. You might even have a friend spot an assist. Getting it a tad higher in the back helps though.

I suggest running a strong static strap or rope from low around the back of the center stand to the front wheel of the bike to keep the center stand from inadvertently collapsing while you are paying attention to something else, and remove the rear wheel first.

For the front, remove both front calipers so that you reduce the amount of forces required to remove the front wheel from the forks. Keep the strap on until it's time to pull the front axle. Use the utmost caution while the jack is picking and holding the front off the ground. The bike's balance is truly precarious at this point. With care, it should be fine. Don’t allow any kids to play around the bike while waiting for the wheels to be completed. Be safe.

P.S. I would wait until I had the front wheel back on, and the jack removed before tackling the spline lube. :)
 

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side note on the 2x4 under the center stand... I find that if you have a helper and you get the bike on the center stand.. you can then lean it to one side and have your helper slide the 2x4 under one foot of the stand and then do the other side
 

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If you have a garage to work in with exposed ceiling joists, you could rig a couple of safety ropes or straps to prevent the bike falling if it gets knocked over while sitting on the centerstand and floor jack.

Going back to the opening post, the vn750 does not have separate fuel filters per se, just the screen/filter on the petcock around the fuel pick-up tubes inside the tank. There are some small clear filters suitable for the gravity fed system on the Vulcan mentioned in posts here and pics in the gallery. Can`t recall where right now.

As far as removing the rear wheel for spline lube and tire replacement, removing the brake shoes from the hub should be straight forward and simple to do. Should do it anyway to inspect, clean and lube the brake mechanism while the wheel is off.

Sloppybf is right about bleeding the old brake fluid out every two years. The brake fluid does absorb water and the contamination will cause corrosion in the system if not flushed regularly.

(BTW, neither water or brake fluid is compressible. Only a gaseous substance like air in the system, or old soft rubber brake hoses cause any *mushy* feeling of the brake lever.)

Ma Kaw recommends changing the brake hoses every 4 years.
These SS brake lines are better and less costly than the OEM when you need too change them.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/FTP-VN750-Vulcan-2006-2008-SS-Front-Brake-Lines-_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem562d0540d3QQitemZ370122506451QQptZMotorcyclesQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories

Somebody here started a thread with pictures when he installed them, but I can`t find it right now. I`ll add the link latter if I find it. Study the sellers ad to understand the advantages they claim.

The backfiring is a result of the emissions system hoses feeding cold fresh air into the exhaust manifold through the reed valves on the cylinder heads. Marbling the hose or replacing the the reed valves with coaster plates is solution.
Link to more info in the Vulcan Verses:
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1083
 

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I did last fall exactly what your trying to do....

put a 2x6 under the centerstand of your bike, this will get the rear tire another 2" off the ground. remove both rear shocks, this will drop the swing arm down and you can easily get to everything, remove the rear tire and lube the splines.

With rear tire off, carfully lift the front end off the ground. Once off, I supported the bike with a carefully cut length of 2x4 and placed it under my crash bar guard. I was about 3" off the ground in the front and able to remove the front tire.

From here, while your bike is teetering on the blocks etc, go get your new tires mounted and balanced. Tell EVERYONE to stay away from your bike at this point- don't want anything to come crashing down.

put tires back on in reverse order.

Hope this helps.
Tim
1995 VN750- Lake Stevens, WA- north of Seattle
 

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If you are as frugal as I am, you can change the tires yourself and save even more $! The procedure is in the Clymer manual. Use an old leather glove to protect the rim. I bought used tire irons on ebay for around $10 + shipping. Paid for themselves the first set of tires. I'm also going to see about balancing them myself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRTkfMRwIZI
 

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If you are as frugal as I am, you can change the tires yourself and save even more $! The procedure is in the Clymer manual. Use an old leather glove to protect the rim. I bought used tire irons on ebay for around $10 + shipping. Paid for themselves the first set of tires. I'm also going to see about balancing them myself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRTkfMRwIZI
use "Ride on".. no balance weights needed!
 

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I used Ride On in the first set of tires and have it on hand for the second. Great stuff! But they tell you to have the tires balanced before adding it to your tires, which I did. Never had the slightest wobble or tire vibration with that combination.
 

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Changed my tires last August. Craftsman motorcycle jack, 2x4 under center stand to help with stability. Worked good.

Ron
 

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Hi! Mostly everything seems to have been covered already, so all that's left for me is to say is if you're getting new plugs, might as well make them Iridium plugs. They are a bit more expensive but last for so long that you'll probably ever buy one set, so they end up being cheaper in the long run. They also provide easier starting for the bike... they are overall the best spark plugs available.
 

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Hi! Mostly everything seems to have been covered already, so all that's left for me is to say is if you're getting new plugs, might as well make them Iridium plugs. They are a bit more expensive but last for so long that you'll probably ever buy one set, so they end up being cheaper in the long run. They also provide easier starting for the bike... they are overall the best spark plugs available.
too true.. can't belive we skibbed that one!
 
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