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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just a quick heads up on something I overlooked. We get aggressive and productive lightening storms around here. They're great because they cut the 100 percent humidity to about 85 percent. They're also great because they equalize all that atmospheric pressure which brings several beautiful days to follow - like today.

The one thing I overlooked: debris in the road. If you're takin' a ride after an electrical storm, give ground crews maybe an extra day to clear road debris. The ride into work today looked post-apocalyptic. Thankfully the roads were clear cause nothin' else was.

Just a heads up. :beerchug:
 

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Down here lightening does get bad. However, most of our debris is from wind damage.
 

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You kidding, I live in Tampa, the lightning capital of the country. We get a storm several times a week. Companies that build surge/lighting protection equipment build their headquarters here.

But for those not used to these storms, you shed good advise.

Jon
 

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A couple of months ago, I was caught at work on the bike with a big cluster of storms moving in (that, according to NOAA, weren't predicted to be there earlier in the day), a small gap, and then a big cluster moving in behind the first one. I tried to time it so that I would "shoot the gap" between the two big globs of storms. Unfortunately, when I got about halfway home, I realized that the first glob had suddenly parked itself directly between me and home and wasn't moving. I stopped underneath a carport at a church to wait it out. People from the church kept walking past me and asking me if I had some aversion to riding in the rain. I told them that no, I didn't have an issue with the rain (I had my raingear on), but that I did wish to put off being electrocuted for as long as possible...

I think that I sat under that carport for two hours before the storm died down enough that I felt reasonably comfortable continuing the trek...

--FA
 
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Ahhhh nothing better than getting caught in a storm that was not predicted. And of course, you leave your rain gear at home...
 

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Ahhhh nothing better than getting caught in a storm that was not predicted. And of course, you leave your rain gear at home...
More often than not. That's me. I've never actually worn my rain gear.
 

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screw that, rain hurts!
 

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Recent lightning fatalities around Hampton Roads

Recent lightning fatalities around Hampton Roads

:motorcycl May 2005 - Richard Moran Jr., 43, of Virginia Beach, killed in Southampton County while riding his motorcycle. :wow:

:confused: Jul 2008 - Tephanie Dawn Kirpes, 23, of Woodbridge, Killed in Sandbridge while Jogging on the beach.

:confused: July 2004 - Raul Vargas Arroyo, killed while working on the roof of a Virginia Beach school.

August 2002 - Heather Hewitt, 26, of Chesapeake, killed in a parking lot in Hatteras, N.C.

August 2001 - Lonnie West, 39, of Gloucester County, killed on a boat at a marina in Norfolk.

July 2000 - Brian Okuley, 46, of Chesapeake, killed while doing yard work at a Virginia Beach home.

July 1997 - Waldo Morales, 18, of Nags Head, N.C., killed while sitting on the beach near the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.


Safety tips

- Lightning can strike as far as 10 miles ahead of a storm.

- Use the 30/30 rule: If the time between the lightning flash and thunder clap is 30 seconds or less, move indoors or into a vehicle. Wait at least 30 minutes after the last clap before going back outdoors.

- Avoid water, metal, or tall and lone trees – it is better to crouch on open ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Recent lightning fatalities around Hampton Roads

:confused: Jul 2008 - Tephanie Dawn Kirpes, 23, of Woodbridge, Killed in Sandbridge while Jogging on the beach.

:confused: July 2004 - Raul Vargas Arroyo, killed while working on the roof of a Virginia Beach school.
Can we talk about these 2 for just a second? Just.....why? You can't need roof work that bad. You also can't need to take a run that bad!!!

Check this out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLJ6oqToKrc

If I have my choice between far from that and possibly getting hit, I'm taking the former. Every. Freekin. Time.
 

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About 50 years ago I saw the matchstick sized remains of a powerpole that had been struck by lightning. I also picked up a piece of dirt at the base of the pole that was fused so full of air bubbles that it floated without hardly displacing any water.

I saw a horse years ago, whose rider was struck by lightning while riding in a wooded area. Both horse and rider died instantly, and a hole big enough to stick your fist through was blown in the saddle. Interestingly, there was not a mark on the horse that I could find.

We do not get the daily seasonal electrical storms you describe in PA, TX and FL. However I do have a great deal of respect for their power when we do get them.
 

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Safety tips

- Lightning can strike as far as 10 miles ahead of a storm.

- Use the 30/30 rule: If the time between the lightning flash and thunder clap is 30 seconds or less, move indoors or into a vehicle. Wait at least 30 minutes after the last clap before going back outdoors.
My rule of thumb has always been "If you can hear thunder, you can be struck by lightening".

My father told me this a long time ago when I was a kid and I have stuck to it. So if I'm ever at a pool,lake,beach or whatever, I get the hell outta there and get inside as soon as I hear the faintest bit of thunder and can see lightening way off in the distance.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
About 50 years ago I saw the matchstick sized remains of a powerpole that had been struck by lightning. I also picked up a piece of dirt at the base of the pole that was fused so full of air bubbles that it floated without hardly displacing any water.

I saw a horse years ago, whose rider was struck by lightning while riding in a wooded area. Both horse and rider died instantly, and a hole big enough to stick your fist through was blown in the saddle. Interestingly, there was not a mark on the horse that I could find.

We do not get the daily seasonal electrical storms you describe in PA, TX and FL. However I do have a great deal of respect for their power when we do get them.
A theory Hoss: like all electricity, lightning follows the path of least resistance. The bolt may have hit the rider and saddle on its way to the big metal saddle buckle under the horse. Remember, lightning treats rider and horse as one as they're touching each other and grounded. That would explain the riders untimely demise. Then the bolt may have been dispersed by the leather. The leather may have acted as a type of less effective rubber if only a little less (poor conductor). In that case, what was left of the charge may have jumped to any metal hardware on the saddle, the rider (spurs), or the horse itself (it's shoes). The voltage in a lightning bolt is nasty but its the amperage that'll kill ya. Remember, its wet in the horses mouth and there's also a metal bit in there. If there was even a tiny fraction of charge left after it nailed the saddle and it found the horses mouth, there'd be little trace but the delivery of electrosis would still be significant. It might have got the equine from the inside out. Imagine putting metal shoes on, being soaking wet, standing in a puddle, biting something metal, then being struck. That horse didn't stand a chance. Just a theory though.

There have been reports of several helicopters getting nailed but all it does is fry the air around the machine because it's not grounded. Some have had the electrical system malfunction a bit but that was the extent. I know large jetliners get nailed all the time. Same thing happens, just fried air.

Check this one out, make sure you can listen to it too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTztOz_EUrE&feature=related
 

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I kinda miss the florida lightning storms! they are nice to watch
 
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