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Those both look like the "improved RR" I installed on my bike shortly after buying it. I moved it outside of the frame because you are correct abut the heat being amajor reason for the initial modification. I am unable to confirm that either the RR20 or the RR26 is a Mosfet. (I really didn't find a working link.) If they are then plug and play is great. When I installed my Mosfet I did cut the stator wires where they ended and then installed the new weather proof ends that came with the Mosfet. 3 from the stator and 1 for the ground then 1 for power to the battery. (5 total). Now I have 10 gauge wires going from the stator to the battery. The only small wires are from the factory. I kept the small gauge stock wires wrapped up and tied out of the way, just because. Many of the stock connectors are toast now and if you need to replace the connector is it literally 6 of one or 5 of another.

The initial mod called for using the Shindigen Mosfet. 10+ years go that brand was the real key to improving the system. I believe now other companies may be able to manufacture Mosfet type regulators. (Many members found even a used Shindigen FH020AA managed their power so well they could add heated grips, more lights and even music without being concerned about "balancing" the load and saving the stator.) The most important part of this mod is to eliminate the stock designed rectifier/regulator with a much improved technology to save the stator.

If the RR20 and RR26 are Mosfet type, everything you state is right on point for improving the electrical system of these bikes. It would even make replacing the aging connector a cinch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
While still waiting for my new RR to arrive, I've been making a plate to mount it in place of the RLU (I'll post pics at at some point). Looks like I'll be able to use the orig yellow wires too as there's just enough slack to get them to the other side of the battery box. I'd like to remove the trigger terminal at the JB, as well as do the blue wire mod mod. But how do I get that dang 10-pin connector out of there? I've got the 8-pin one out but there's clearly a different trick to the 10. (For reference, have a look at the picture of the JB I posted earlier in this thread. The 10-pin is the lower one. The pic will show you how the connector lock is a different style.)

I've broken enough of these things over the years trying to get them apart on various engines and machines. Rather not break another one if I can help it.
 

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While still waiting for my new RR to arrive, I've been making a plate to mount it in place of the RLU (I'll post pics at at some point). Looks like I'll be able to use the orig yellow wires too as there's just enough slack to get them to the other side of the battery box. I'd like to remove the trigger terminal at the JB, as well as do the blue wire mod mod. But how do I get that dang 10-pin connector out of there? I've got the 8-pin one out but there's clearly a different trick to the 10. (For reference, have a look at the picture of the JB I posted earlier in this thread. The 10-pin is the lower one. The pic will show you how the connector lock is a different style.)

I've broken enough of these things over the years trying to get them apart on various engines and machines. Rather not break another one if I can help it.
The lock moves outward to release, have to get behind it, but the lock is at the inside end of those two tabs. Even if they break, it should still stay put.

Some WD-40 might help.

I rerouted the stator wires up over the transmission. The clutch lever was cutting through the sheath of the harness. Would give you plenty of extra wire if you need it.
 

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You've probably got a good grip on which connector is which, but I thought I'd pass this on. ...

When I did these mods I got the connectors mixed up and had to start over. The 8-pin is the larger plug, and the 10-pin is smaller.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
The lock moves outward to release, have to get behind it, but the lock is at the inside end of those two tabs. Even if they break, it should still stay put.

Some WD-40 might help.

I rerouted the stator wires up over the transmission. The clutch lever was cutting through the sheath of the harness. Would give you plenty of extra wire if you need it.
Thanks! I got it off using your suggestions. I'm glad I did too so I can clean up this corrosion 😮:

Wood Circuit component Engineering Gas Machine


Thanks to your other suggestion of routing the stator wires up over the transmission, thus eliminating ALL the yellow wires and giving me 10 ga. right to the MOFSET, I suppose there's no need to unclip the little yellow wire from the 10-pin connector (but I did anyway).

I'm pretty psyched at how well this is all starting to come together. Like I said in my last post, I'm taking pictures so I can document the process. For though I took my battery box out to repaint it, this new location mod should prove doable for anyone without needing to remove it.
 

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Those both look like the "improved RR" I installed on my bike shortly after buying it. I moved it outside of the frame because you are correct abut the heat being amajor reason for the initial modification. I am unable to confirm that either the RR20 or the RR26 is a Mosfet. (I really didn't find a working link.) If they are then plug and play is great. When I installed my Mosfet I did cut the stator wires where they ended and then installed the new weather proof ends that came with the Mosfet. 3 from the stator and 1 for the ground then 1 for power to the battery. (5 total). Now I have 10 gauge wires going from the stator to the battery. The only small wires are from the factory. I kept the small gauge stock wires wrapped up and tied out of the way, just because. Many of the stock connectors are toast now and if you need to replace the connector is it literally 6 of one or 5 of another.

The initial mod called for using the Shindigen Mosfet. 10+ years go that brand was the real key to improving the system. I believe now other companies may be able to manufacture Mosfet type regulators. (Many members found even a used Shindigen FH020AA managed their power so well they could add heated grips, more lights and even music without being concerned about "balancing" the load and saving the stator.) The most important part of this mod is to eliminate the stock designed rectifier/regulator with a much improved technology to save the stator.

If the RR20 and RR26 are Mosfet type, everything you state is right on point for improving the electrical system of these bikes. It would even make replacing the aging connector a cinch.
Click on the underlined word mosfet for the link. They are mosfet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
As promised, here's my MOFSET upgrade with relocation mod! Do I like it? Yes! Was it easy and would I recommend it? Nope x2!

Instead of using the stock location underneath the battery box, I moved it to the former location of the RLU behind the R side cover. Things in there turned out to be a lot tighter than I'd anticipated. If I had to do it over again, I would make a mounting plate like Spockser's under the L cover instead of on the R.

Nevertheless, here's what I did:

First of all, I was intrigued to learn that the bolt pattern for the RLU is identical to that of the stock RR location under the battery box (BB) But there were two factors that required me making a new plate anyway:

1) the Mofset mounting holes are just a smidge farther apart. Despite one being slotted, it would still not quite fit with the stock layout.

2) More importantly, the wiring harness would definitely not fit if the Mofset socket (or stock RR for that matter) was pointing downward. There just isn't enough room under there. And even if there was, the wires would be right on top of the goat's belly.

This first pic shows the R side of the BB, with RLU still attached.
Machine tool Gas Machine Wood Juice


Here in the 2nd pic is my new mounting plate. I had many options to choose from but I chose a household jct box cover for universality's sake. (I was hoping I could recommend this mod to others and so kept things simple.)
Gas Plate Bumper Auto part Wood

The next pic shows my cover plate installed. I painted it and lopped off the little 'ears' to make it look spiffier. The new orientation for the Mofset would be with the wires pointing toward the R (the front of the bike). To do this also meant drilling the stud holes left of center. I figured that using the 'stud' design would come in handy for installing the new RR once it came. Meanwhile, I set about putting the BB back into the bike.
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


This pic simply shows the left side of the BB reinstalled with the JB and stock RR removed. Those three yellow wires will now remain unused, as I unplugged the stator leads from them (which are a larger gauge), rerouted them over the transmission instead of under it, and over to the new RR location.
Motor vehicle Wood Gas Bumper Automotive exterior


Now you get to see my mounting plate in place. You can see the three stator leads at the frame V as well as the dangling solenoid. On the L is the ignitor unit and on the R is the rear cyl coil. The ground wire from frame to engine is at top R (connected to the BB bolt).
Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive design Hood Automotive exterior


And here is the new Shindengen Mofset kit, shown with stock RR (above) for comparative purposes.
Product Tool Font Auto part Metal


Now here is when things began to get interesting! To my dismay, I hadn't factored in the clearance I would need to connect the wires to the new RR. I had the dimension specs but didn't think to add the harness also, not to mention how tight the wires themselves would be against the swing-arm crossbar. I had to "slot" my mounting bolts in order to slide the plate as far left as possible. Scratches in the paint ensued! And don't bother to ask what the extra holes are for above the mounting bolts. They're not for anything (i.e., they were a mistake!).
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Automotive exterior Gas


Anyway, the good news: The final result!
Not shown is the couple of hours between the last picture and this one. Some of that time was spent making the wire harnesses which is fairly straightforward following the directions that come with the RR. The bulk of the time, however, was getting it all to fit.
Land vehicle Vehicle Motor vehicle Hood Car


The wires, as you can see on the right, are still pretty close to the swing-arm - so tight in fact that there was no way to just "slip" the RR onto the studs I'd made for that purpose. The BB had to stay unbolted so I could maneuver everything in just so. The solenoid wires had to be manipulated too. The clearance between the RR and the side cover bracket is also zero.

Anyhow, project complete = time to ride! 😎
 

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As promised, here's my MOFSET upgrade with relocation mod! Do I like it? Yes! Was it easy and would I recommend it? Nope x2!

Instead of using the stock location underneath the battery box, I moved it to the former location of the RLU behind the R side cover. Things in there turned out to be a lot tighter than I'd anticipated. If I had to do it over again, I would make a mounting plate like Spockser's under the L cover instead of on the R.

Nevertheless, here's what I did:

First of all, I was intrigued to learn that the bolt pattern for the RLU is identical to that of the stock RR location under the battery box (BB) But there were two factors that required me making a new plate anyway:

1) the Mofset mounting holes are just a smidge farther apart. Despite one being slotted, it would still not quite fit with the stock layout.

2) More importantly, the wiring harness would definitely not fit if the Mofset socket (or stock RR for that matter) was pointing downward. There just isn't enough room under there. And even if there was, the wires would be right on top of the goat's belly.

This first pic shows the R side of the BB, with RLU still attached.
View attachment 54561

Here in the 2nd pic is my new mounting plate. I had many options to choose from but I chose a household jct box cover for universality's sake. (I was hoping I could recommend this mod to others and so kept things simple.)
View attachment 54560
The next pic shows my cover plate installed. I painted it and lopped off the little 'ears' to make it look spiffier. The new orientation for the Mofset would be with the wires pointing toward the R (the front of the bike). To do this also meant drilling the stud holes left of center. I figured that using the 'stud' design would come in handy for installing the new RR once it came. Meanwhile, I set about putting the BB back into the bike.
View attachment 54563

This pic simply shows the left side of the BB reinstalled with the JB and stock RR removed. Those three yellow wires will now remain unused, as I unplugged the stator leads from them (which are a larger gauge), rerouted them over the transmission instead of under it, and over to the new RR location.
View attachment 54564

Now you get to see my mounting plate in place. You can see the three stator leads at the frame V as well as the dangling solenoid. On the L is the ignitor unit and on the R is the rear cyl coil. The ground wire from frame to engine is at top R (connected to the BB bolt).
View attachment 54565

And here is the new Shindengen Mofset kit, shown with stock RR (above) for comparative purposes.
View attachment 54566

Now here is when things began to get interesting! To my dismay, I hadn't factored in the clearance I would need to connect the wires to the new RR. I had the dimension specs but didn't think to add the harness also, not to mention how tight the wires themselves would be against the swing-arm crossbar. I had to "slot" my mounting bolts in order to slide the plate as far left as possible. Scratches in the paint ensued! And don't bother to ask what the extra holes are for above the mounting bolts. They're not for anything (i.e., they were a mistake!).
View attachment 54567

Anyway, the good news: The final result!
Not shown is the couple of hours between the last picture and this one. Some of that time was spent making the wire harnesses which is fairly straightforward following the directions that come with the RR. The bulk of the time, however, was getting it all to fit.
View attachment 54568

The wires, as you can see on the right, are still pretty close to the swing-arm - so tight in fact that there was no way to just "slip" the RR onto the studs I'd made for that purpose. The BB had to stay unbolted so I could maneuver everything in just so. The solenoid wires had to be manipulated too. The clearance between the RR and the side cover bracket is also zero.

Anyhow, project complete = time to ride! 😎
Nice job!

Now we need a voltage report... After your ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Thanks! And I'm happy to report that on my 90 mile trip, the voltage stayed at a cool and consistent 14.2 - 14.5. 😀
 
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Congratulations on your project. Is everything hidden by the side cover? (Picture with cover please!!) Did you go with a mega fuse or breaker? I do not recall anyone placing it under that cover before so it will be interesting to see how it works out. I do not think heat would be any worse under that cover than the one on the opposite side and the left cover placement has been documented as successful. Additionally, you were able to address the corrosion issues before they got out of hand. Good job.
 
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Click on the underlined word mosfet for the link. They are mosfet.
The first few times I clicked on the Mosfet in the post it just took me to a blank page on the Vulcan Forum. I was able to get it to work today though and went to the site. They offer a large assortment of items. I wonder if the difference between the RR20 and the RR26 is one is a 35 amp and the other the 50 amp? I also see they may have replacement coil pickups, so that is another plus.

The only downside may be the exchange rate between the dollar and the pound. I know some parts I simply need to source in the US because by the time you factor the value of the dollar and the cost of shipping some UK parts get expensive. Also some times shipping can take much longer than usual especially with Covid. Maybe one day they will open a US location. Thanks for the new parts source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Congratulations on your project. Is everything hidden by the side cover? (Picture with cover please!!) Did you go with a mega fuse or breaker? I do not recall anyone placing it under that cover before so it will be interesting to see how it works out. I do not think heat would be any worse under that cover than the one on the opposite side and the left cover placement has been documented as successful. Additionally, you were able to address the corrosion issues before they got out of hand. Good job.
Thank you.
Fuel tank Automotive fuel system Automotive tire Motor vehicle Motorcycle


The only thing you can see apparently is that big red wire. I actually hadn't noticed that myself until I took this picture. I'll have to see if I can disguise it a bit better somehow!;)
The kit came with a maxi-fuse and about 8 inches of wire on either side of it. It also came with another foot or two of wire and some butt connectors if I needed them. I didn't. The fuse is accessible from either the side cover or from under the seat. It's tight, but reachable.
As for heat, I took the side cover off after my ride the other day and put my hand right on the RR. It was no warmer than anything else in that area. That was very gratifying, as you can imagine.
 

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Sweet, I think you did a great job. I didn't want to sound negative about anything. My question about fuses or breakers is for another post. I covered my wires with common automotive plastic split corrugated "loom" wire cover. I have rolls of it but you can usually grab some from a salvage yard for little to no cost. Black tape will work a long time also.
Good job and thanks for thinking of a new way to use the spot where the old RLU used to live. Thanks for the pictures also.
 
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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Sweet, I think you did a great job. I didn't want to sound negative about anything. My question about fuses or breakers is for another post. I covered my wires with common automotive plastic split corrugated "loom" wire cover.
No worries. And that's a great idea about the split loom. I have a bunch of that too but hadn't thought of using it for concealment purposes.
 
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