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You're failing to account for brake fade. He's cut his fade margin by 50%. One hard stop may be fine, but the second could end in disaster. Half the material absorbing heat during a stop and half the surface area venting it afterwards? No thanks.

As to bikes with no brakes in the front? Put them in the same group as Jerry.
 

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For a long time, these bikes ran with no brakes at all. Was still true in the 90s, not sure about now.

 

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....... No rev limiter said:
Gonna go ahead and call you dead wrong on this one. Without ABS I'd be street pizza.
 

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You're failing to account for brake fade. He's cut his fade margin by 50%. One hard stop may be fine, but the second could end in disaster. Half the material absorbing heat during a stop and half the surface area venting it afterwards? No thanks.
Doubt most of us don't ride hard enough for "brake fade" to be an issue...hence my comment about race bikes. There's A LOT of bikes with only one disc, some using the same size brake pads.... So yes, twice as much is better...but there are other factors...as the bike does NOT have ABS, I can attest that with the duel brakes in front, it is in fact easy to lock the wheel, and on the Vulcan that's not a good thing.
Go back through the years and read some of the posts where members have crashed. Many went down, and admitted they "panicked" and locked the front wheel.
Again I'm not saying it's a good idea to disable half your braking power, but I think you're over estimating the risk here.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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Single disk masters are designed to work with one caliper and have less psi.my cb750c had a caliper removed because one failed and the guy didn't want to replace it. Now the other caliper hangs up when used and sticks bad enough to make the front wheel shake.good it works for him,just wish he would use his disclaimer everytime he mentions it as it doesn't work for all bikes,and someone else might try it.I personally never had an issue with the stock brake locking up on a Vulcan,but then I get to know my bike and I train for situations in parking lots.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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Oh and I've ridden a few drum front brakes that stop real well.
 

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I'm not saying he's guaranteed to crash (obviously not, as it's at least held up through 60,000 miles of riding without a problem yet. The point is that somebody engineering the bike decided it was worth the money to add the cost of a second disc, caliper, pads, line, etc. I'm inclined to believe that was based on time spent testing. My concern is not that the brakes will fail under ordinary circumstances. It's for the unforseen events, like multiple stops in succession, long hill descents, etc. You don't want to end up looking like one of HD's recent failures:
Harley-Davidson Street 750's Brakes Completely Fail In Magazine Test


For what it's worth, if the goal is to improve brake feel, a master cylinder with a smaller bore diameter would help immensely. The trick is selecting one with enough volume to lock the brakes, but requiring enough travel in the lever to allow precise modulation.
 

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There is no guarantee that anyone is not going to crash, though it has not happened to me yet on the street. I have had a lot of get offs on dirt bikes, and got banged up pretty good racing MX back when I was a teenager. And unfortunately it looks like some of those old injuries have come back to cause me problems when I got older.

What I can guarantee is there is nothing wrong with the design of the brake system as I currently have it. I did extensive testing, from high speed to a dead stop, on the verge of lockup, over and over again. I also had concerns about fade. It didn't happen. That, plus 60,000 miles ridden in town, in bumper to bumper stop and go traffic on the freeway (no lane splitting here) hot, cold, snow, rain, there have simply been no issues. I have ridden larger heavier bikes with less braking performance, that had dual discs, including my former 1997 HD Road King. It's brakes were completely stock and unmodified. My current stock 2013 Royal Enfield 500 Bullet has brakes that are so bad I avoid riding it in traffic as much as possible.

Since brakes are mechanical, they can fail, no matter how well they are designed and how well they work when they are working as designed. Parts can break. Seals can fail. Hoses can leak. Fittings can come loose. Nothing mechanical is failure proof, though I trust mechanical things more than electronic things. Mechanical things can be visually inspected. I make sure my brake lines have no cracks, the fittings are tight, I check pad wear, I replace the fluid once a year. I was a professional mechanic for 32 years. I know how mechanical things work, and I seriously over maintain my vehicles. I have been riding on the street for 40 years and on about the same number of bikes. I am not one to make modifications based on a whim, or just because they look or sound cool.

As for the engineers that designed the Vulcan 750, as anyone who has owned, ridden, and worked on one for any length of time (I've had one since 1993) knows, they have a number of design flaws. Just read the Vulcan Verses. The Vulcan 750 appears to be a Frankenbike from the factory. It's complexity and the way it is put together makes it look like there were a number of design changes before it was actually built. It's engine seems more suited to a chain drive sportbike than a cruiser. And yet, as complicated as it is, the much simpler Suzuki Intruder 750/800 outruns and out brakes it. But it does have other advantages, like amazing comfort (for me) smoothness, and the ability to easily cruise at an indicated 80 mph all day, a centerstand, and safer and easier to repair tubeless tires. I didn't know exactly what I was getting when I bought my first new one in '93. I quickly found out. That is what led me to buy another new one in '02. Unlike today's 750-900 cruisers, which are being marketed as "urban" bikes, the Vulcan is a very capable high speed solo touring bike that just loves to eat up miles, and I have taken full advantage of that.
 

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... And yet, as complicated as it is, the much simpler Suzuki Intruder 750/800 outruns and out brakes it. But it does have other advantages, like amazing comfort (for me) smoothness, and the ability to easily cruise at an indicated 80 mph all day, a centerstand, and safer and easier to repair tubeless tires. I didn't know exactly what I was getting when I bought my first new one in '93. I quickly found out. That is what led me to buy another new one in '02. Unlike today's 750-900 cruisers, which are being marketed as "urban" bikes, the Vulcan is a very capable high speed solo touring bike that just loves to eat up miles, and I have taken full advantage of that.
My sporty is fastest in the world and with only one disk in the front. I, however, MISS THE HELL out of a CENTER STAND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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My sporty is fastest in the world and with only one disk in the front. I, however, MISS THE HELL out of a CENTER STAND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I'll bet it's that one disk that makes it so fast.less wind resistance ;)
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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There is no guarantee that anyone is not going to crash, though it has not happened to me yet on the street. I have had a lot of get offs on dirt bikes, and got banged up pretty good racing MX back when I was a teenager. And unfortunately it looks like some of those old injuries have come back to cause me problems when I got older.

What I can guarantee is there is nothing wrong with the design of the brake system as I currently have it. I did extensive testing, from high speed to a dead stop, on the verge of lockup, over and over again. I also had concerns about fade. It didn't happen. That, plus 60,000 miles ridden in town, in bumper to bumper stop and go traffic on the freeway (no lane splitting here) hot, cold, snow, rain, there have simply been no issues. I have ridden larger heavier bikes with less braking performance, that had dual discs, including my former 1997 HD Road King. It's brakes were completely stock and unmodified. My current stock 2013 Royal Enfield 500 Bullet has brakes that are so bad I avoid riding it in traffic as much as possible.

Since brakes are mechanical, they can fail, no matter how well they are designed and how well they work when they are working as designed. Parts can break. Seals can fail. Hoses can leak. Fittings can come loose. Nothing mechanical is failure proof, though I trust mechanical things more than electronic things. Mechanical things can be visually inspected. I make sure my brake lines have no cracks, the fittings are tight, I check pad wear, I replace the fluid once a year. I was a professional mechanic for 32 years. I know how mechanical things work, and I seriously over maintain my vehicles. I have been riding on the street for 40 years and on about the same number of bikes. I am not one to make modifications based on a whim, or just because they look or sound cool.

As for the engineers that designed the Vulcan 750, as anyone who has owned, ridden, and worked on one for any length of time (I've had one since 1993) knows, they have a number of design flaws. Just read the Vulcan Verses. The Vulcan 750 appears to be a Frankenbike from the factory. It's complexity and the way it is put together makes it look like there were a number of design changes before it was actually built. It's engine seems more suited to a chain drive sportbike than a cruiser. And yet, as complicated as it is, the much simpler Suzuki Intruder 750/800 outruns and out brakes it. But it does have other advantages, like amazing comfort (for me) smoothness, and the ability to easily cruise at an indicated 80 mph all day, a centerstand, and safer and easier to repair tubeless tires. I didn't know exactly what I was getting when I bought my first new one in '93. I quickly found out. That is what led me to buy another new one in '02. Unlike today's 750-900 cruisers, which are being marketed as "urban" bikes, the Vulcan is a very capable high speed solo touring bike that just loves to eat up miles, and I have taken full advantage of that.
The intruder is also close to 100 lbs lighter than the Vulcan, but that probably doesn't matter.no,that wouldn't make it stop or accelerate any quicker.now race a vn750 against a c50 boulevard (same motor,more weight)and the Vulcan wins,hands down.
 

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The intruder is also close to 100 lbs lighter than the Vulcan, but that probably doesn't matter.no,that wouldn't make it stop or accelerate any quicker.now race a vn750 against a c50 boulevard (same motor,more weight)and the Vulcan wins,hands down.
I rode the C90 Blvd., those things are like tractors and just as big. 1500cc and can't run with our VNs. Every gear change is like, klunk-a-chunk, you definitely can't crank up through the gears like a 750.
 

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My former '97 Harley Road King was also like a tractor. It was certainly slow for it's size, and very clunky in the shifting department. But all Harleys are, and they seem to be built strong enough to handle it. And if you did have transmission problems, you didn't have to take the engine apart to fix it. A VN750 would definitely outrun it, but big v-twins are a totally different type of bike. They are not meant to be fast. They are for someone who enjoys the sound, low frequency vibration, and torque that smaller high revving engines just can't provide. They have a really sweet highway ride. No buzz, just a deep rumble.
 
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