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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm thinking about selling my vulcan...

I love the bike to death, but with the amount of problems its been giving me and the prospect of using the money to finish my private pilot's license has motivated me to stick a for-sale sign on her.

But before I do, I have some questions.

The bike has a bad charging system (stator and probably a regulator) and a vacuum leak somewhere in the carbs. I was wondering if I would be able to make more of a profit by repairing these problems first or selling the bike as is. I cannot with a clear conscience neglect to tell a prospective buyer about these problems, even though they probably won't surface on a test ride. You can read the list of accessories on my signature, but other than that, the bike has about 26,000 miles on it and is in pretty good shape, both cosmetically and mechanically (aside from the above mentioned). I also have full documentation of maintenance and repairs performed since I've owned the motorcycle, which is about two years now.

What is a good private seller asking price both with and without the repairs done and what is the best time of year to sell a bike. I know I can tackle the repairs myself, but would love to avoid dumping more time and money into this thing.

Any advice would really help, thanks.
 

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Vintage bike addict
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859 Posts
Spring is when to sell. Fixing is cheaper than replacing it. That said you can fix it or sell it for going value minus repair costs.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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^ Yep, Spring is the time to sell, when cold weather comes along seems like there are boats & bikes for sale in every yard...lol...
Good to see someone being honest about their for sale bike, seems to be a very rare trait anymore, I salute you...:smiley_th...
That being said, if you don't need the cash immediately, this winter would be a good time to fix her up if you were so inclined...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Premium Member
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641 Posts
If you're going to spend the time and money to fix the current problems, I would say keep it.

Since you definitely want to sell it, just minus the cost of repairs from the FMV. I wouldn't waste time and money fixing it unless you decided to keep it.
 

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I say fix it up as best you can. Not only do you love the bike so should want to fix it, but if you fix it you'll get more for it. Since you're selling it to get cash, get as much as you can. A fixed bike goes for more.

I'm speaking from personal experience here. I love riding almost more than anything else on the planet but if I had to choose (heaven forbid) between flying and riding, I'd sell my bike too. When I was getting the private license my motto was, 'whatever it takes.' Like you said, buy the ticket - take the ride. You're trying to but the ticket now so, whatever it takes. I assume you've considered keeping the bike and becoming a temporary man whore correct? :D

As far as what you can get for it, ask for the stars. With an astronomical starting price you can haggle down to something you can live with. In Spring, a 94 with 26k with a bad charging system and a vacuum leak - you're looking at maybe a grand and I think that's generous. What kinda bite is a grand gonna take outta your private license? A ride-it-don't-fix-it bike with those specs I'd ask for 2200 and work down from there reeeeeeeeal slow. I paid 2500 for my 93 with 15k on the clock but it was immaculate. If you fix it yourself it shouldn't cost the grand you'd earn otherwise. Were I you, I'd go the distance. Ask yourself how bad you wanna fly, sky brother. I'd sell my younger brother to stay in the air. He's kind of a pain in the ass though. :p

Let us know what you decide and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yea a grand is about what I'm looking for. I paid $2000 for the bike and have dumped at least a grand into random repairs. Conveniently, I'll need about a thousand bucks to finish up my license, I'm SOOO close, just need to get current, learn how to work the G-1000 glass cockpit, bust out some solo cross countries, and finish my written. All in all I'm looking at about ten to fifteen hours until I'm ready for the check-ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
And I do love the bike, I'd love to see someone else get the same enjoyment out of it. My biggest fear is that someone will buy it, not tackle the repairs, and then let it rot behind their garage for God knows how long. But, I have to look at the bottom line too. I don't have the means to maintain this bike any more now that I'm flying again and really want to move it. But don't worry guys, I'd never disgrace her by parting her out ;)
 

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Yea a grand is about what I'm looking for. I paid $2000 for the bike and have dumped at least a grand into random repairs. Conveniently, I'll need about a thousand bucks to finish up my license, I'm SOOO close, just need to get current, learn how to work the G-1000 glass cockpit, bust out some solo cross countries, and finish my written. All in all I'm looking at about ten to fifteen hours until I'm ready for the check-ride.
Sorry if you know this already but this stuff helped me get mine. If you've been keeping up with the books, the written will be no problem. As it should be, it's mostly common sense. If you're getting back into it, consider brushing up on charting. You'll have to prove that before going on your cross countries. Blow the 70 bucks on an electronic flight planner, they're worth it. Cardboard E-6b's are a pain. Call the flight safty phone number (for your area) before each flight. Remember to get the weather at destination airports and make sure there are no NOTAMs. Your instructor should ask if you called. Get the aircraft ident before you fly and practice radio calls on your way to the airport. Last but never least: CHAIR FLY!!!!

And let me know when you get it, I'll toast you.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Haha well the thing is I already took my written back in high school. I got a 93 on it, but apparently they expire after two years... so I have to retake it.
 

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^ Not sure when high school was for you but it was at least over 2 years ago. Things may have changed or likely updated. I recommend getting the test prep text book. It let's you know what aspect of aviation you may need more focus on. Mine was navigation. The book has the charts and figures you'll see on the test. It even has several of the questions you'll see. It's worth it's weight in gold:

http://www.mypilotstore.com/mypilotstore/sep/599

Highlight, read, highlight, read, repeat repeat repeat. You should ace it.

Also, chart like a madman. Ask someone to pick a random location somewhere and chart to it. Yes, all aircraft have GPS now-a-days but charting is pilot heritage and we have to learn it. Remember your wind calculations and corrections, there's also weight and balance. Don't forget your fuel burn calculations either. Run through emergency procedures with yourself or someone else. Include all your warning lights and systems in there.

Ok, I'm really gonna stop typing now. Sorry if it's overload, just trying to get you some free duel...
 
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