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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I immediately noticed a small oil drop under my bike (makes it easy when your garage floor is made of plastic tiles). I did some research on this forum/Youtube and believe it to be the shift shaft seal. I am seeking your guidance.

1.) I plan to replace the shift shaft seal by just removing the shift pedal lever and using some basic tools (flat head screwdriver, pick, etc.). Any other advice for me? I'll be sure to document this in a Youtube video for my channel that I'm working on. My Youtube Channel Playlist for VN750 Maintenance and Service

2.) Is Part # 92051-005 the correct one? Partzilla Oil Seal 92051-005. I found this from a previous forum post, but on the Partzilla website I do not see the VN750A listed.

3.) I'm pretty sure all I need to replace is the first "washer" (part #3 in the Clymer Manual image below...Clymer calls it a washer but it's also the "shift shaft seal"). Do you think I need to replace BOTH "washers"? There are two #3's, so are there two oil seals I should replace?

Thank you, as always, for your responses. This forum continues to help me modify/improve/maintain my Vulcan! I've owned it for two years now, and have put 12,000 miles on it so far. She's at 25,300 miles!


The Oil Leak:
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Close-up of Shift Pedal Lever:
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Underside of engine/near oil pan, showing the oil drip/leak:
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Clymer Service Manual, page 236:
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You gave all the right info.

You should be able to pick out the old seal for removal, the drive the new seal straight in. Lube with motor oil on the rubber seal before installing.

If you can find the correct diameter pipe, either iron or PVC, it should make installation easy. If not, just pieces of wood will do, just alternate hits on all sides.

The washers, #3, will be inside the case beside the circlips, so you shouldn't have to deal with those.

Be careful not to hit the shifter shaft which can knock a circlip loose, because then you'll have to pull the case.

I wedge a flat screwdriver in the gap on the shift lever to make sure it slides on/off easily without needing to tap on it, which can move a circlip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You gave all the right info.

You should be able to pick out the old seal for removal, the drive the new seal straight in. Lube with motor oil on the rubber seal before installing.

If you can find the correct diameter pipe, either iron or PVC, it should make installation easy. If not, just pieces of wood will do, just alternate hits on all sides.

The washers, #3, will be inside the case beside the circlips, so you shouldn't have to deal with those.

Be careful not to hit the shifter shaft which can knock a circlip loose, because then you'll have to pull the case.

I wedge a flat screwdriver in the gap on the shift lever to make sure it slides on/off easily without needing to tap on it, which can move a circlip.
Thank you! I'll post back here with an update when it's done. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You gave all the right info.

You should be able to pick out the old seal for removal, the drive the new seal straight in. Lube with motor oil on the rubber seal before installing.

If you can find the correct diameter pipe, either iron or PVC, it should make installation easy. If not, just pieces of wood will do, just alternate hits on all sides.

The washers, #3, will be inside the case beside the circlips, so you shouldn't have to deal with those.

Be careful not to hit the shifter shaft which can knock a circlip loose, because then you'll have to pull the case.

I wedge a flat screwdriver in the gap on the shift lever to make sure it slides on/off easily without needing to tap on it, which can move a circlip.
Hey, do you think I'll be able to do this job with a bike full of motor oil? Or should I wait until I do an oil change to perform this job?
 

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Hey, do you think I'll be able to do this job with a bike full of motor oil? Or should I wait until I do an oil change to perform this job?
If you can lean the bike over to the right, I think you should be able to do it without draining the oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I recently replaced mine during a stator replacement, and as I recall the seal seats from the inside. Not that my memory is all that great...
Well I hope you are wrong, because I am hoping I can replace the shift shaft seal from the outside (ie by simply taking off the shift lever and the old seal, then putting the new one on). ;) Good on you for replacing the is while you were in there for the stator job!

Does anyone here know definitively if the shift shaft seal can be replaced from the outside of the bike? Please and thank you. :)
 

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I had to replace it because it was visibly F'd up when I got the casing off.

The seal isn't just a rubber o-ring. It has a metal outer ring that holds the seal and seats in the casing. I don't know how one might go about removing/replacing it with the case and the shift shaft in place.
 

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I replaced mine with the cover removed, but tapped it in from the outside.

As with many seals, you just have to start bending and peeling it out, destroying it in the process. Vise grips are handy, you get a tab picked/pulled up, then clamp the vise grips on and pull/pry. Just make sure you don't break the side cover.

Side cutters are handy too. Use the same way as vise grips.

If you're lucky you can hammer a small screwdriver through the face of seal (metal part) then pry and pop the seal out.
 

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Couldn't find the seal replacement in the manual.

The manual does say that using the center stand for stator removal will keep oil loss to a minimum, so changing the seal should be fine using the center stand.

The first three threads in this search say to remove/replace the seal from outside the case.

Lance said a 1/2" pvc pipe fits over the shifter shaft to drive the seal in.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Couldn't find the seal replacement in the manual.

The manual does say that using the center stand for stator removal will keep oil loss to a minimum, so changing the seal should be fine using the center stand.

The first three threads in this search say to remove/replace the seal from outside the case.

Lance said a 1/2" pvc pipe fits over the shifter shaft to drive the seal in.

Alright, so I'm feeling much much better about this job after reading the recent posts here and also the ones you linked, Spockster. Thank you! I swear, so long as the information on this forum remains, then a lot of these VN750's will remain on the road! I love to see it.

It seems like the best/only way to seat the seal is from the OUTSIDE. This is awesome! That means I don't need to remove the engine again (I had the dealer do this last year for my stator job). I'll also try the PVC pipe trick.

So...just to confirm...before I ruin my bike (lol)...see below for a close-up shot. I want to remove the black rubber piece while leaving alone the copper-colored piece, correct? If so, I can do this! And I'll do so via a Youtube video so I can get some of this incredible written knowledge into a video format for all others who have this issue in the future.

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Alright, so I'm feeling much much better about this job after reading the recent posts here and also the ones you linked, Spockster. Thank you! I swear, so long as the information on this forum remains, then a lot of these VN750's will remain on the road! I love to see it.

It seems like the best/only way to seat the seal is from the OUTSIDE. This is awesome! That means I don't need to remove the engine again (I had the dealer do this last year for my stator job). I'll also try the PVC pipe trick.

So...just to confirm...before I ruin my bike (lol)...see below for a close-up shot. I want to remove the black rubber piece while leaving alone the copper-colored piece, correct? If so, I can do this! And I'll do so via a Youtube video so I can get some of this incredible written knowledge into a video format for all others who have this issue in the future.

View attachment 55308

No, the copper colored area is the metal portion of the seal. You'll see it when you get the new seal.

I would use a small flat screwdriver and drive it into the center of the flat metal area, then lever it up/down to see if the whole seal will pop out.

If the seal doesn't move, I would keep pushing the screwdriver in one direction to raise a tab of metal. Then clamp vise grips onto that tab, twist and pull to peel the metal apart. The seal will eventually become loose enough to come out.

You can also puncture the metal in another area and try to pop it again.

You might be tempted to try putting the screwdriver between the copper seal body and the aluminum side case, but that's a good way to damage the soft aluminum case.

It's always preferable to get the seal out in one piece because if you're left with a ring of metal stuck in the hole, then you have to try getting between that ring and the aluminum case.

The new seal just goes in dry except for some oil on the rubber lip of the seal. Make sure the hole is clean of any debris before driving the new seal in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
No, the copper colored area is the metal portion of the seal. You'll see it when you get the new seal.

I would use a small flat screwdriver and drive it into the center of the flat metal area, then lever it up/down to see if the whole seal will pop out.

If the seal doesn't move, I would keep pushing the screwdriver in one direction to raise a tab of metal. Then clamp vise grips onto that tab, twist and pull to peel the metal apart. The seal will eventually become loose enough to come out.

You can also puncture the metal in another area and try to pop it again.

You might be tempted to try putting the screwdriver between the copper seal body and the aluminum side case, but that's a good way to damage the soft aluminum case.

It's always preferable to get the seal out in one piece because if you're left with a ring of metal stuck in the hole, then you have to try getting between that ring and the aluminum case.

The new seal just goes in dry except for some oil on the rubber lip of the seal. Make sure the hole is clean of any debris before driving the new seal in.
Thanks! This is exactly what I was seeking to set me up for success for this job. I'll post back to this forum with an update. Cheers!
 

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I didn't see this post or I would have replied sooner. I just installed a new seal on my bike last week and it was not a big deal. I put my bike on the center stand and placed some weights on the luggage rack to put the back wheel on the ground (I did not loose a drop of oil). Then I started a drywall screw into the seal, just between the rubber and the metal. Do not go very deep. As soon as the screw is started, you can pull it (the seal with the screw in it) off the shaft with a pair of pliers. (If you push too hard the screw will hit the case behind the seal.) Just poke a hole with a pick to use to start the screw. Unless you are very carefull I would not suggest using a power drill/screwdriver. Do it by hand.

I used a deep well socket to set the new seal. The seal is tight against the case on the backside and the case fits close around the shaft. It cannot be removed from the backside easily as you only have the hole the shaft pokes through to access it. It pulls easily from the front if the shaft is not though the case. It is not possible to install it from the back. If you mess up and the rubber pulls out, place a thin piece of wood (think door shim or cedar shingle) against the case and pry the metal ring off with a screwdriver. I have seen some with sealer on them like blue thread locker but mine was clean.
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I didn't see this post or I would have replied sooner. I just installed a new seal on my bike last week and it was not a big deal. I put my bike on the center stand and placed some weights on the luggage rack to put the back wheel on the ground (I did not loose a drop of oil). Then I started a drywall screw into the seal, just between the rubber and the metal. Do not go very deep. As soon as the screw is started, you can pull it (the seal with the screw in it) off the shaft with a pair of pliers. (If you push too hard the screw will hit the case behind the seal.) Just poke a hole with a pick to use to start the screw. Unless you are very carefull I would not suggest using a power drill/screwdriver. Do it by hand.

I used a deep well socket to set the new seal. The seal is tight against the case on the backside and the case fits close around the shaft. It cannot be removed from the backside easily as you only have the hole the shaft pokes through to access it. It pulls easily from the front if the shaft is not though the case. It is not possible to install it from the back. If you mess up and the rubber pulls out, place a thin piece of wood (think door shim or cedar shingle) against the case and pry the metal ring off with a screwdriver. I have seen some with sealer on them like blue thread locker but mine was clean.
View attachment 55309
This is incredible, thank you so much! This is sage wisdom right here! I'm able to fix my oil leak for a $7 part and maybe an hour or so of work in the garage. Plus I'll record this in a You Tube video for all others in the future. Thanks again and I'll post back here with an update. Cheers!
 

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Thanks! This is exactly what I was seeking to set me up for success for this job. I'll post back to this forum with an update. Cheers!
You're welcome.

Going to use those magic tools of yours? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
And a link too, please!
You got it! I'll reply back with the link. Currently I have these 4 videos done for my playlist. I want this to be as easy as possible for all future owners who need this same work done...plus I myself plan to be a long term owner so I'll be referring to some of these videos next time I need to do a coolant flush, for example. :)


Before year-end I will also complete the shift shaft seal, brake fluid flush, oil change, spline lube, and front brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You're welcome.

Going to use those magic tools of yours? :)
Hahahaha! That's the quickest way I know to make a one hour job (or less) into a multi-hour long job. It would be neat, though, to see it in stop motion. ;)
 
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