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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I will be reinstalling my carburetors soon I need some pointers on the sequence of installing. I know I have to go in from the bikes right side. I know I have to have one of the rubber inlet hoses on the front cylinder. I know I have to line up the nipple with the mark on the cylinder. I know I have to install the inlet on the carburetor for the rear. I know I have to hook up the choke cable I know I have to hook up both throttle push and pull what I’m confused about is the sequence to reinstall the rubber air sleeves that go to the surge tank while the carburetor are out I have tried to see if I can install one on the left side and I don’t want to rip it and I don’t wanna manhandle it. I believe I read you’re supposed to put it in the search tank before you put the carburetor in I’ve watched all the videos, but there’s not much on how to get that elbow back in. I know about squeezing it and about lubricating it. I just want to get some tips on how to accomplish it.

I have been looking through my treasure trove parts, and I’ve come across a Corbin seat genuine to fit a Vulcan 750 it’s got the certification stamp. It has the serial number or the model number engraved in the back plastic all the rivets are intact. There are no rips no tears the material is ostrich pattern, leather sides, the seat portion, and the back are alligator pattern. There’s no provision for a back rest. Other than the stock back portion it’s really a nice seat notorious it has memory foam marked on the back. I’ve never had it on my bike. I bought it when eBay with the intention of using it and then I found a Corbin with backrest and I use that instead, I will be posting some pictures of it. Anyone interested please contact me. I have to look up and see what I paid. Then I’ll figure out what I need to get for it when I got it. I used leathertique to clean it and oil it and then I use the cleaner and I’ve been putting Australian yellow saddle soap on it. It’s really a nice seat. In excellent condition the seats were new sold in the five to $700 range. I will be nowhere near
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I will be reinstalling my carburetors soon I need some pointers on the sequence of installing. I know I have to go in from the bikes right side. I know I have to have one of the rubber inlet hoses on the front cylinder. I know I have to line up the nipple with the mark on the cylinder. I know I have to install the inlet on the carburetor for the rear. I know I have to hook up the choke cable I know I have to hook up both throttle push and pull what I’m confused about is the sequence to reinstall the rubber air sleeves that go to the surge tank while the carburetor are out I have tried to see if I can install one on the left side and I don’t want to rip it and I don’t wanna manhandle it. I believe I read you’re supposed to put it in the search tank before you put the carburetor in I’ve watched all the videos, but there’s not much on how to get that elbow back in. I know about squeezing it and about lubricating it. I just want to get some tips on how to accomplish it.

I have been looking through my treasure trove parts, and I’ve come across a Corbin seat genuine to fit a Vulcan 750 it’s got the certification stamp. It has the serial number or the model number engraved in the back plastic all the rivets are intact. There are no rips no tears the material is ostrich pattern, leather sides, the seat portion, and the back are alligator pattern. There’s no provision for a back rest. Other than the stock back portion it’s really a nice seat notorious it has memory foam marked on the back. I’ve never had it on my bike. I bought it when eBay with the intention of using it and then I found a Corbin with backrest and I use that instead, I will be posting some pictures of it. Anyone interested please contact me. I have to look up and see what I paid. Then I’ll figure out what I need to get for it when I got it. I used leathertique to clean it and oil it and then I use the cleaner and I’ve been putting Australian yellow saddle soap on it. It’s really a nice seat. In excellent condition the seats were new sold in the five to $700 range. I will be nowhere near View attachment 55356

If the elbows are good condition and still pliable, you should be able to just smash it together to fit through the hole, then pull it back out slightly so it engages the groove with the lip of the surge tank. These are normally pretty tough and shouldn't tear easily.

I usually push in deeper than it needs to go, then pull it back outward to catch the groove.

There are other ways, but you're limited with the amount of space below the surge tank. A piece of twine in the groove and pull the ends opposite of each other, same as installing a rubber windshield gasket. But there really is no room for that.

If you cave it in with your thumb, push it through the hole, then pull back, it should snap into the groove.
 

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If the elbows are good condition and still pliable, you should be able to just smash it together to fit through the hole, then pull it back out slightly so it engages the groove with the lip of the surge tank. These are normally pretty tough and shouldn't tear easily.

I usually push in deeper than it needs to go, then pull it back outward to catch the groove.

There are other ways, but you're limited with the amount of space below the surge tank. A piece of twine in the groove and pull the ends opposite of each other, same as installing a rubber windshield gasket. But there really is no room for that.

If you cave it in with your thumb, push it through the hole, then pull back, it should snap into the groove.
Remember how there was a discussion about changing one's own tires by squeezing them into a smaller configuration with zip ties? I bet you do.

I sort of used that same general idea for reinstalling the rubber hoses back into the bottom of the surge tank. I caved in and then folded the rubber until it was roughly half the size. Then I took a wine cork and placed it against the unfolded side of the rubber, and then put a zip tie around the whole thing. Once I had the rubber tube up and in position, that wine cork gave me enough space to slip a set of linesman's snips over the zip tie so I could cut it without risk to the rubber.

Worked like a charm.

When spring arrives, I'm doing that ear shave. I don't want to battle with those hoses and the surge tank anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If the elbows are good condition and still pliable, you should be able to just smash it together to fit through the hole, then pull it back out slightly so it engages the groove with the lip of the surge tank. These are normally pretty tough and shouldn't tear easily.

I usually push in deeper than it needs to go, then pull it back outward to catch the groove.

There are other ways, but you're limited with the amount of space below the surge tank. A piece of twine in the groove and pull the ends opposite of each other, same as installing a rubber windshield gasket. But there really is no room for that.

If you cave it in with your thumb, push it through the hole, then pull back, it should snap into the groove.
should I do the elbow install after the carburetor is in place or should I pre-install it in the top and then turn it for clearance for the carburetor?
 

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should I do the elbow install after the carburetor is in place or should I pre-install it in the top and then turn it for clearance for the carburetor?
Pre-install sounds better, as long as it will flex enough to hook up with the carbs in place. You'll have less room to put them into the airbox once the carbs are in.

I only took mine off, and never used them again. I'll try to see what the manual says about it.

Edit: Looks like the manual wants you to install the ducts after the carbs are installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pre-install sounds better, as long as it will flex enough to hook up with the carbs in place. You'll have less room to put them into the airbox once the carbs are in.

I only took mine off, and never used them again. I'll try to see what the manual says about it.

Edit: Looks like the manual wants you to install the ducts after the carbs are installed.
Thanks for heads up looking for anyone who has done this. manual says install after carbs installed not a lot of room in there I remember I removed them on each side and then removed the front and rear carburetor inlet rubbers. Then pulled carbs It was easy pulling the elbows out but going back in I don’t know anyone .
 

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You also check Roach's video series and see how he handled it, lots of good tips there. This is a link worth saving. Edit: I see now he did the earshave and also installed the carbs with the engine removed, might be easier to see how they go on though. It's in Part 26.


Those ducts are really pretty tough, you can smash the heck out of them and they pop right back into shape.

You might consider putting the cables on before installing the carbs, might be easier.

You'll also want to make sure the cables open the throttle plates at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The throttle plates were syn by the carburetor re-builder. I will install the two throttle cables and the choke cable if i can
I will smash the elbows as you suggested and i have applied a water proof marine grade grease to soften the rubber and will also warm them up to help with the pliability. I will go slow and be patient when doing the job of re-installing i guess when its all done and my problem solved i will act like expert.

Thanks for all the great advice
 

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The throttle plates were syn by the carburetor re-builder. I will install the two throttle cables and the choke cable if i can
I will smash the elbows as you suggested and i have applied a water proof marine grade grease to soften the rubber and will also warm them up to help with the pliability. I will go slow and be patient when doing the job of re-installing i guess when its all done and my problem solved i will act like expert.

Thanks for all the great advice
Right, .... Not looking at the bike I forgot one of the cables is a push cable. I think the CB350 twin Honda had one cable on each carb. My mistake.

You're welcome any time! ;)
 

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Just another variation on great advice; I installed the carbs first with the throttle cables already attached. I then connected the 'choke' cable (pita) just before setting the carbs in to the mounts. Next I silicon oiled the lips of the boots, and folded the lip of each one, to get them set in the surge tank. After that, I 'set' the lip farther in to the tank by using a blunt flat pusher on the side of the lip while pushing up with my hand. I worked my way around through the limited access, but the method worked well for me. The tool I used was a screwdriver like tool with an exaggerated smooth blunt flat blade.
Good luck, patience is the best tool.
 
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