Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
'03 VN750 "Rosie"
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Specifically with regard to electrical components. My usual routine is to put a plastic grocery bag over each handgrip to keep water out of the switches. I remove the seat and saddle bags and tuck another bag over the battery compartment and the wiring in there, and for today's wash I also wrapped the wires going to the tail light and rear turn signals. Is this overkill and unnecessarily redundant over protectionism??
 

·
Jack of all trades
Joined
·
2,863 Posts
I never really get up that high. I clean the bars and grips by hand. As far as the seat goes I leave it on while I wash. You shouldn't need an absurd amount of water pressure to clean the bike anyway. Just exercise aim while u wash and you should be fine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
I actually wash mine only about once a year, and when I'm done, it is spotless, top and bottom. I pretty much tear it down to the engine, frame, and wheels. I use several different kinds of cleaners, tooth brushes, Q-tips, sponges, and paint brushes. I wash all the parts I took off separately, then reassemble everything. I pay particular attention to nooks and crannies, hidden areas, and places like slots in screws and the recesses in Allen bolts.

Go down to your local library, and get a copy of "Ultimate Motorcycle Detailing" by David H. Jacobs. It explains the whole procedure in great detail. Thats right, it takes a whole book to explain it.

The rest of the year, I mostly just use a garden sprayer full of distilled water to rinse the dust off it (dust is the biggest problem here, for a bike stored in a garage) I remove the windshield and soak it in water (usually in the bathtub) for a while to soften up the bugs, then wash it with hair shampoo, and dry it with VIVA paper towels. Never wipe a windshield or painted surface until ALL dirt has been flushed off of it, or you will wind up sanding it instead.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,865 Posts
You wash your bike? Seriously?

I would never spray water on my bike. I tend to use plexus for the plastic and Honda spray polish + cleaner for all the metal, rubber and use leather/vinyl cleaner on the seat.

I only use soap and water on the tires/wheels if they get muddy, but I use a tub or bucket , not a garden hose.

I then use "Ice" wax on everything but the rubber and seat.

Spraying your bike with a hose is so, uh, last century. Water sucks as a cleaner and just causes rust and corrosion.

Spray contact cleaner works great removing grease off engine parts. I do use armor-all on cables and hoses.. Not on tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Splash it all over

I use household dish washing liquid,,used it for years,and i dont care where the water goes,it dont bother the bike at all !. After washing i give it the waxing and its gleeming again !. I actually ride my bike in the rain,so its used to getting wet !!! :wow:
 

·
Headbanger/Popes of Hell
Joined
·
6,723 Posts
I spray the bike down with "Bike Bright" then wash it off with the hose. then "blow dry" the bike with my leaf blower. also use "Pledge" on the windshield. works great, takes bugs right off! and smells good too! lol in a nutshell, that's it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,865 Posts
And by the way.... I only clean the whole bike like very few years.... I forgot how anal some folks get on keeping their bike "clean".

Water spots on the windscreen are one thing.... But "detailing" a bike borders on anal unless your talking about an every year or two year kind of thing...;)


(I have not "washed" my bike for 3 years so far). I do "spot clean" different sections every now and then.. ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,353 Posts
I never use a hose to wash the bike. I usually use a bucket of water with dish soap to clean the rims and tires. as for the rest of the bike, I use the detailing method, but usually only a real detail job is done in the fall before she goes in the shed until the weather allows riding. Since I did some experimenting with the exhaust this weekend, I polished some of the chrome bolts and pieces while they were off the bike. Rain doesn't seem to bother the bike, but I see no reason to hose it down and saturate all the wiring and cables.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Every time we get home from a 'day ride' I use a Wipe 'N Clean towelette, Costco sells them in a box of 200, starting with helmets and sunglasses then to the bike. I wipe down the tank and gauges and work my way down to the wheels and maybe the garage floor before I toss it in the trash. Never a great cleaning job, but my bikes never look too bad to ride.
When I get in the mood to really clean, I'll use the garden hose and purple power or simple green on the wheels and greasy parts and Ice on the shiny stuff. Never more pressure from the hose than what I would spray at my face.
 

·
Old Truck Junkie
Joined
·
4,133 Posts
Yes, they are made to ride in the rain, however; there are places that high pressure car wash water will go that rain will not go. And that is into the electical connection and the junction box. Most rain comes down and does not have the pressure that the wash water does. Wash water comes in at all angles. And can in some cases give you an electical problem.

BTW. I ussually give my bike a wipe down. Fenders, fuel tank, side covers and some of the chrome. Where I live it will look the same in a couple of days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
I wash mine with a water hose when I detail it (about once a year), but without a spray nozzle. I have a washing machine hose with one end cut off that I can squeeze to make it spray a little. Around here, besides dust, which is everywhere, is that the water is very corrosive (loaded with calcium chloride) and it is imperative to get ALL the faucet water off of it. It does more than leave spots. Those spots will start to eat right through paint and metal. I use a combination of air pressure and distilled water in a garden sprayer to get it all off, and then put WD-40 in several locations, like all the locks, all the electrical connections, inside both switch housings, on the footpeg pivots, and a number of other places to displace water and lubricate them, Detail time is also maintenance time, from lubing the splines to lubing the throttle assembly, and all the cables. It is much easier to clean the rear wheel and parts like the swing arm and final drive while it is off for the spline lube. I then know that the bike is not only spotlessly clean, but everything is in good shape to last another year.
 

·
Old Twistie Sticks Rider
Joined
·
5,072 Posts
/\ First understand, I hate washin, love ridin... Yep, hose'r down, then I mix a bit of wash & wax car wash soap stuff in a pail and use one of those soft china-mart hand brushes on her, stiffer wheel brush on the wheels & tires, every once and again I use a used "Swifter" duster thingy to go between the close places, sometimes I even remove the bags, but mostly I don't... Then comes the leaf blower, then about a 5 mi. ride to dry & warm everything up, if I'm not goin on a real ride...
I may wash her once or twice a year, but that's about all, if it's wash'n weather, it's ridin weather...
My windshield is on my PU so I wash it when I wash the truck...lol...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,236 Posts
I hose mine off wash with car wash soap about once a week(Black isn't a color,it's a commitment).Give it a good waxing about 3 times a summer,Armoral Buttery Smooth wax is almost as good as Plexxus and that is saying something.

If you live in KY and ride any at all you will get rained on,period.Last year when I arrived at the gathering ,my bike had been Rained on from KY to OH.It got the car wash treatment that time,no way around it.

Anal,I guess I'm some what so. Every cold season it is in a heated garage where I can uncover the frame and give it all a cleaning do a fresh spline lube,I even pulled my swing arm and checked the bearings this time since I found a driveshaft boot cracked and in need of replacement.

I clean all the nooks and crannies and fix what minor annoyances that have cropped up on my list over the riding season and do any projects that I have planned for it.This year was a tach ,big air kit and power commander.I also polish all the aluminum back out till it shines and check for any issues(remember the driveshaft boot?).

When spring comes ,I roll out on a bike that looks as good as new,freshly serviced and ready to ride all summer,hopefully trouble free.Then it is ride,wash it when it gets dirty and repeat.:smiley_th
 

·
Giggity!
Joined
·
4,307 Posts
Good old wash bucket & garden hose. Nothing high pressure, just a rinse. Once it's clean I give it a quick shamie <(probably spelt wrong, ltms) Then I blow it off with my air compressor to get the sitting watter out of all the nooks & cranies.

Any left over water streaks are cleaned up when I wax it. I use the "Ice" stuff too. No old school residue to wipe away. ;)

Only MicroFiber rags & towels.
 

·
Sparky!!!
Joined
·
8,697 Posts
i don't wash my bike.. i just get a bucket of water every spring and grab a spounge and some 1500 grit sand paper, and go to town sanding until paint is smooth, then spray on a new coat of paint.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,865 Posts
Hose the whole thing down, it won't melt; Contrary to popular belief (and exercise), these things are made to ride in a downpour
Kind of like saying "my bullet proof vest is made to stop bullets, so I go to the range each week and have folks shoot at me..."

Bikes are not "made to ride in downpours" ... Those little plastic sleeves that fit over your bullet connectors are sold as "water resistant" , NOT "waterproof".

The plastic connectors , like the one on the R/R, isn't shielded at all. (might explain why 80% of R/R failures occur durring or just after a ride in the rain.

Water promotes rust...why would you want to hurry this process along by adding more?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
I use the wind to blow the little amount of dust of if she's lucky a little bit of rain lol clean and sparkly usually suggests butt jewlery lol Just dont use a pressure washer and look out for areas like the stearing bearings etc. A little common sense goes a long way. (No offense intended)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Water promotes rust...why would you want to hurry this process along by adding more?
Probably because I'm not anal retentive about washing my bike. It's not a showpiece and I've got bigger fish to fry. Although I have to admit a thorough drying with a leaf blower and/or 70 mph run usually follows. Besides I like the ferrite look, anyhow.
 

·
Big Dumb Viking
Joined
·
597 Posts
Wait...you're supposed to wash 'em? *boggle*
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top