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I have Dunlap 404's on a used bike that I bought. the tread is real good. I don't know how to figure the age. The numbers are on the front NA7M2808 and on the rear NA7M1109. Am I looking at the right numbers?

Mcneuby
 

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Dates on tires

Thanks I just couldn't make sense of it. I really like this forum. A great bunch of people.

Mcneuby :smiley_th
 

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First two digits are the week the tires were made and last two are the year.
 

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This thread made me want to check my dates. When I bought my 2001 last March (2011) the front B-Stone s11 had the 'noogies' on it, so its a new tire. The only number I see are the DOT #'s and at the end is 2310. So its ~May 2010? It had an Avon Venom on the rear, and the DOT number ends in 1105. Am i looking at the right numbers also?
 

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That's the correct number that you need to look at. The rear is almost 7 years old.
 

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I took the Avon off and installed a used Dunlop 404 off my dad's '86, because i got him two B-Stone s11's. His are dated at the early 2011. I didnt know the date of the D404 when stalling. Nor did I know that age is such a safety hazard. The tire I put on was on my dads bike when he bought his is 2004, this tire could very well be ten years old. And im sure you're asking "why dont you just look at the date and find out!" thats where it gets weird, I did, and it SAYS it was made is 1986? the last 4 #'s were 4386. that is strange because it had a ton of tread, my dads bike is a 1986, that has 18,000 miles, so if it was the original tire, id imagine it's be worn out!
 

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Prior to the turn of the century, tire codes were just three numbers. The year was only one digit. I don't think that number is the tire code.
 

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thats what i thought. I read on the link earlier in this thread that the '4 number' code started in 2000.
 

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If the tire was manufactured before January 1st 2000, the last 3 digits of a DOT number represented the week (2 digits) and the year (1 digit) of production. For example, if the last three digits are 063, the tire was produced in the 6th week of 1993. There is often a triangle after the single year digit. Tires produced after January 1, 2000 have a 4-digit date code at the end of the DOT number. The first 2 digits represent the week of production and the final 2 digits represent the last 2 digits of the year of production. For example, 4104 indicates that this tire was manufactured on the 41stweek of 2004.
 

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either way, I gotta get that tire off of there before I do some major summer riding, where its gunna get real hot. It's over ten years old. I think im gunna try and get a 170/80/15 B-stone spitfire.
 

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I never learned to read those numbers. At work we always wear the tires out before they need to be replaced. Tire age is by no means the whole picture. If a tire has been left sitting out in the AZ sun, it could be badly damaged in 3 years, with cracks all over the place. On the other hand, My '72 Pinto still has it's original spare tire, an A70-13 Goodyear Polyglas belted, which is now 40 years old. I put over 2,000 miles on that tire, some of it at freeway speeds, with no problems. When I got a new tire, I put that one back in the spare tire compartment, and will continue to use it as a spare. It had absolutely no cracks in it. When kept in complete darkness, a tire can last a VERY long time. I don't even look at a tires age, which is why I don't care about the numbers. I go by it's condition.
 

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I got a big bridgestone with loads of good tread on the rear of mine,the tire still looks as good as when it was put on !!so its staying on. The date on that tire is 2003.
 

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The research I did prior to purchasing was pretty unanimous on replacing motorcycle tires after a certain date of manufacture regardless of tire condition. The reason had nothing to do with tire condition or tread depth. Tires are full of volatile organic compounds (VOC) that out-gas over time, resulting in degraded performance and eventually dry rot. The recommendations on when to replace a tire (regardless of condition) vary by class/type of bike;

Racing: after 2 years
Street Sport: after 3 years
Cruisers/touring: after 5 years

In fact, the local race track will not let any bike on the course with tires more than 2 years old, even if they are brand new! I'm told other race tracks have similar rules.
 

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When dry rot actually shows up (it will be in the form of small cracks all the way around the tire) then it is time to start thinking about replacing the tire. But the time it takes can vary from a couple of years to several decades. Ozone and UV from the sun seem to be two of rubbers worst enemies.

One other thing that can damage a tire fairly quickly is if the vehicle is left sitting on the tire for any length of time. The tire will develop a permanent flat spot, it will feel bumpy, and if you continue to use it, the plies will start to come apart at the flat spot. The longer it sets, and the lower the pressure, the more damage it will do. Thats why I always recommend storing vehicles with the tires off the ground. I stored a car for more than 5 years once, in my garage, sitting on jackstands.
 

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When dry rot actually shows up (it will be in the form of small cracks all the way around the tire) then it is time to start thinking about replacing the tire. But the time it takes can vary from a couple of years to several decades. Ozone and UV from the sun seem to be two of rubbers worst enemies.

One other thing that can damage a tire fairly quickly is if the vehicle is left sitting on the tire for any length of time. The tire will develop a permanent flat spot, it will feel bumpy, and if you continue to use it, the plies will start to come apart at the flat spot. The longer it sets, and the lower the pressure, the more damage it will do. Thats why I always recommend storing vehicles with the tires off the ground. I stored a car for more than 5 years once, in my garage, sitting on jackstands.
Small cracks best change my tyres then because they have cracks all round both of them, the bike has not been on the road since 1998 so the tyres are a bit old now lol, that could be the reason Im not riding it at the moment, 2 new Avon venoms on the way as I type, has anybody used these tyres before???
 

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I think i would love a 170/80/15 metz 880 but its so expensive!
 

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I'm chimin in on this one guys your right about the numbers on the tire being the week and year the other thing is its good to know thes number do to recall possibility also I wouldnts put that much importance on it if it was on a car but on the bike that's a bigger safety issue in my mind I've been workin with tires for some time you guys just be safe and think twice on the importanse on the dot numbers
 
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