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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone hopefully I'm not beating a dead horse here but bear with me.

I am taking my bike FINALLY to the KAW dealer next week, the tires finally came in, to get them put on by them. I am getting new valve stems and I am going to ask/tell them to grease the rear spline. Simple enough right??

(Insert paranoid "Anyone who works on any of my vehicles I don't trust mindset" here)

My question is how the hell do I know if in fact they did grease it, especially if I had to pay a little extra to get it done??? What if they say, "Nah it's not listed on the shop invoice because we always do it when we change the tires, it's included in the price"? Without taking the wheel off myself how do I know?? And if something happens and it is determined to be that the bike broke due to insufficient spline lubrication then what??
The KAW does have a decent reputation in town, not stellar but okay, for repair work but I still can't help but feel a little uneasy.

Am I being overly paranoid or am I on the right track?
 

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The only way to tell is to take off the tire and check the splines yourself. If you are going to do that, you may as well grease them yourself. Grease not only the rear splines, but the slip coupling on the rear of the drive shaft. and also, give a light coat of moly on the grears of the ring and pinion gears. Dont forget the front splines, you can spray them with white grease. just pull the rubber boot and spray the front drive shaft splines.

The dealer would have to charge you at least an extra hour labor to grease the splines. They have to remove the lower shock bolts and pull the rear drive unit off of the drive shaft. The dealer isnt going to give you anything extra for free.
 

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Don't forget the old trick that I used to get free oil changes for the rest of my life from a Jeep dealer in Westchester. I was having carb troubles in my YJ and they were going to put on the 3rd new carb to solve the problem...well i was a bit sceptical so i took out the center punch and marked the parts.

That evening when i picked up the Jeep, in fact it was still in the bay, i paid the hefty dealer charge and went with the manager to the jeep. He said yup look at the shiny new carb, it runs great now...then i asked why is my mark still on the carb body...did you mechanic know my initials? Well after a few law suit threats, a new carb was in place and the owner calmed me by giving me a card with free oil changes for life on the back. Of course i would never go back to him again....

To this day I always mark the parts I think may need to get changed or removed. A few minutes of poking around is worth it, just don't leave the dealer until you check for your marks.

PS: I jumped into this thread cause I figured it would go off topic quick with a subject of " How do you know if they greased the rear spline??"...Congressman Foley??
 

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Off topic..... off topic.... we'd never do that!!! how did you like that meatloaf???

;) Try marking the end of the exposed threads with red paint or white out and then see if it is still there before you leave. mark it from thread to case then you can tell if it has been removed.

PS.. mark more than one bolt.. and mark one on the bottom ( out of plain sight ) and take a mirror to see it.

how's that for an idea??
 

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95vn750 -> Exactly!!!

Excuse me while I go grease my spline...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great tips guys.

I haven't looked in the Clymer manual but wouldn't it be really easy to grease the splines once the back wheel is off?

I like the paint marking idea.
 

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With the back wheel off you have to still disconnect the shock on the left and loosen the four bolts holding the final drive unit to the swingarm. Fairly simple once the wheel is off.
I don't know of ANY service department that would "automatically" do the splines with a tire change. If it is done, it should be noted on the invoice. If it is noted on the invoice then you have a document that says they did it.
If they said they did it on the invoice and they didn't, then you have a case against them.
 

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Dianna said:
With the back wheel off you have to still disconnect the shock on the left and loosen the four bolts holding the final drive unit to the swingarm. Fairly simple once the wheel is off.
I don't know of ANY service department that would "automatically" do the splines with a tire change. If it is done, it should be noted on the invoice. If it is noted on the invoice then you have a document that says they did it.
If they said they did it on the invoice and they didn't, then you have a case against them.
It's that "refrigerator light" problem, isn't it? I agree w/ Dianna on the invoice part, although I have to say that the reason I started doing my own work was because a dealer gave me a bill for $230 when I took my partner's bike in for its 800-mile check-up, and nothing was itemized. When I asked if the mechanic had taken care of two very distinct issues I'd asked to be addressed, the "children" at the shop said, "No, it's not on the invoice." Well, *nothing* was on the invoice, I pointed out, so how did they know if the bike had even been touched? At that point, they brought out the service manual for the bike, showing me what is recommended by the manufacturer at 800 miles. :mad: They lost themselves in the circularity of their own logic. Anyway, on our way home, one issue that I'd requested be addressed re-emerged, at which point I called and spoke to the service manager. Despite the fact that the issue had clearly not been addressed - or at least adequately taken care of - he defended his employees, saying, "If they said they did it, then they took care of it." (Would've been nice if he'd been an empiricist...).

Anyway, if you're feeling brave and you have faith in the Verses, my suggestion would be to take on the task yourself and then you can be absolutely certain the splines are lubed. Then you don't have to rely on someone else's word, you don't have to worry about "what ifs" in terms of lawsuits, etc., *and*, best of all, you'll have the satisfaction of knowing that you can take care of this aspect of your bike yourself. Fergy's weblink with pics is fantastic - you absolutely can't go wrong if follow his step-by-step instructions.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Crobin, my mind has started to wander even more and I am real close to just rolling up my sleeves and greasing the splines myself. Plus I highly doubt I'm going to like the price the KAW dealer is going to charge.
Between the Clymer manual and the KAW service manual and the website recommnended it sounds dumb not to just do it myself. Plus I feel like from all the brains on this site I could get help with any little snags I might have.

Thanks everyone for your help!
 

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If you print up and follow the procedure Fergy put together, you will not go wrong. I used it and it all comes apart and goes together as advertised. It is really very easy and painless as far as maintenance goes.
 

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I agree with Skyrider. Use Fergys notes with pics. They were EXTREMELY helpful. It took me about an hour or so the first time I did it - and I am no wrench head.
Just make sure you have all the tools you start (basically just wrenches, new cotter pins - which you can get at your local Home Depot real cheap, and of course...the lube). :)

Dom
 

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dgcam55 said:
I agree with Skyrider. Use Fergys notes with pics. They were EXTREMELY helpful. It took me about an hour or so the first time I did it - and I am no wrench head.
Just make sure you have all the tools you start (basically just wrenches, new cotter pins - which you can get at your local Home Depot real cheap, and of course...the lube). :)

Dom

I absolutely agree, even with the amount of time. Fergy tells you what tools you need, including the socket sizes, etc. You may want to get a couple of combo wrenches if you don't already have them - for ex., I had to use a 17mm combo to get the shocks off because my sockets weren't deep enough. I read his isntructions about 5 times, read the Clymer manual about 5 times, printed his instructions out, and just went step by step, page by page. Completely painless!!

Good luck!:smiley_th
 

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While I agree that doing it yourself is easy, if you are already going to have the bike in the shop for a new back tire. I say, WATCH THEM LUBE THE SPLINES! That is what I did. It doesn't take that long to do it all and I would rather watch than trust.

Either way, good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just got the bike back on Saturday. Everything seems to be fine, boy the tires have 50 times more grip than the old ones. ( I got Metzler ME 880s by the way)

Thanks for all the feed back!
 

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Kait's point is a good one - did you watch them lube the splines as they were putting on the new treads? Either way, if you start to fret about it or if it's just time to re-lube, Fergy's the best!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I wasn't able to watch them grease it but I may do it myself just for fun soon anyway. I'll definitely consult Fergy's tips.
 

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accord_guy said:
We sometimes call it that at my house also.

alas after a mear 26 posts Cegodsey has already captured another :doh:
 

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Ka-chingggg!
 

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It sickens me but I just read a new post where someone else just found their splies dry, rusted and shot, on an 03 no less! Don't trust anyone! Check them yourself. Doesn't take but about 2 hours. Best 2 hours you might ever spend not riding!
 
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