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Riders who have cut their teeth in the urban jungle don’t understand the fear that can grip a traveling rider when the fuel light comes on while deep in the American Southwest. I’ve seen stretches of road with no fuel for over 100 miles, and on the Dalton Highway in Alaska, I undertook a section of road that I knew was too much for either my Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra or the hardy Kawasaki Ninja 600 my companion was riding on the final gravel stretch to Prudhoe Bay. In most instances, a little common sense can go a long way towards making sure you aren’t stranded by simply filling your tank when it gets less than half-full while riding remote, unfamiliar roads.

Sometimes, the adventure gets the best of our self-control, sending us off half-cocked into the wilderness – or maybe we just get lost occasionally. You can, without too much trouble, carry some extra fuel with you. On the aforementioned Alaska trip, I strapped a five gallon plastic can on the passenger seat of the Ultra. When I got back to a more civilized environment, I fueled my bike and gave the can to a local bike shop. I considered the cost of the donor can to be a worthwhile insurance payment against getting stranded.

Off-road riders who routinely travel beyond their bike’s range buy fuel cans that are made to be mounted on motorcycles. Roto Pax and other manufacturers make cans in a wide range of sizes and designs mounting solutions that can be adapted to motorcycles. Still, storing that extra gas can be dangerous if not done properly...
Read more about How Do I Carry Extra Fuel On My Motorcycle? at Motorcycle.com.
 

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2014 KLR 650!
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3,361 Posts
While not legal to run, in an emergecy I don't really care and not like anyone will notice. I carry four of these cans. They are metal so they don't smell and they can be refilled with your normal fuel if you use them in your mover. They fit beautifully in my saddle bags.

 

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2000 VN 750 Senior Member
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2,494 Posts
While not legal to run, in an emergecy I don't really care and not like anyone will notice. I carry four of these cans. They are metal so they don't smell and they can be refilled with your normal fuel if you use them in your mover. They fit beautifully in my saddle bags.
I have thought about carrying extra fuel in old Seafoam aluminum bottles. Just have to avoid heat.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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16,080 Posts
I've though about it,but the way my bikes throw things off nobody would ride behind me;)
 

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2000 VN 750 Senior Member
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2,494 Posts
I've though about it,but the way my bikes throw things off nobody would ride behind me;)
They would be M. Cocktails launched like the old depth charges from WWII.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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16,080 Posts
Them and my explosive farts...
 
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2000 VN 750 Senior Member
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2,494 Posts
I use these...

MSR® Liquid Fuel Bottles

Small one for Seafoam, big one for extra gasoline.

They have a vent hole that opens before the cap is completely unscrewed.
Venting is the one thing I have a concern about especially carrying a bottle of fuel inside a black saddle bag and then parking the bike while stopped for food.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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16,080 Posts
Venting is the one thing I have a concern about especially carrying a bottle of fuel inside a black saddle bag and then parking the bike while stopped for food.
Pressurized cocktails.SWEET!!!!
 
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