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Ba dum dum, ching...
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So I got some money for Christmas which I used to buy a pair of Gerbing G3 heated gloves. After installing the jack and heatroller I tried them out today. Here's my review of these gloves...


THEY ROCK!!!!


I've always had a problem with cold fingers and no matter how warm the rest of me is if my hands are cold I'm miserable. I did a lot of reading and came to the conclusion that Gerbing and Warm-n-Safe were the two best manufacturers of heated gear. I looked on-line but found them at my local bike shop for the same price and got to see em' and try em' on. I was out today trying them out (temp about 35) and had to turn them down to half otherwise they were too warm (imagine that). I'm so stoked! No more cold fingers when I'm winter riding. Woo Hoo!!!!
 

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Straight roads are evil
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Yeah! I've got heated gloves too. As long as my hands are warm, all of me feels warm.

Mine are by Tourmaster. Sadly I can't recommend them. While they do work, and work well, there are many tiny annoyances with them. If they ever break I'll get Gerblings.
 

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I know this is an old post, but I have to agree... the Gerbing gloves are the best! I've tried a couple different ones, and the Gerbing T5, or G3 gloves are amazing... no noticeable dexterity loss, comfortable, and very warm... they heat up in a few seconds, and stay nice and toasty while you ride...

Without the heat on, they're comfortably insulated down to around 40 degrees. I've ridden through two very cold winters here in Georgia (I know, it's the south but it gets down into the teens on some days), in the wind, rain, and even snow, and my hands stayed warm and dry...

I gave my last pair to my brother last Christmas, and just got a new pair of the Gerbing G3 gloves... had to use them this morning (26 degrees), and they work great!!
 

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I know this is an old post, but I have to agree... the Gerbing gloves are the best! I've tried a couple different ones, and the Gerbing T5, or G3 gloves are amazing... no noticeable dexterity loss, comfortable, and very warm... they heat up in a few seconds, and stay nice and toasty while you ride...

Without the heat on, they're comfortably insulated down to around 40 degrees. I've ridden through two very cold winters here in Georgia (I know, it's the south but it gets down into the teens on some days), in the wind, rain, and even snow, and my hands stayed warm and dry...

I gave my last pair to my brother last Christmas, and just got a new pair of the Gerbing G3 gloves... had to use them this morning (26 degrees), and they work great!!
Nice. I'm pretty impartial toward anything that's heated because when it's freexzing out and you got the breeze blowing on you. Anything feels great :p

Definitely heard good things about Gerbings though.
 

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2000 VN 750 Senior Member
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How does the electrical system on the VN 750 hold up when you plug in some heated items? I had been under the impression that it is pretty well taxed as it is and adding anything else may cause a problem. That had been one of the main reasons for converting to LED lights (to save the electrical system).
 

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How does the electrical system on the VN 750 hold up when you plug in some heated items? I had been under the impression that it is pretty well taxed as it is and adding anything else may cause a problem. That had been one of the main reasons for converting to LED lights (to save the electrical system).
At normal cruising speed (65-70 mph) a stock bike has about 70w of power available. Heated gloves use about 35w. Jacket liners or jackets about 40w, heated pants/chaps about the same.
The problem is trying to use two seperate pieces of heated gear together. A heated jacket and gloves can easily go over that 70w range.

The other problem is that 70w rating is under ideal conditions, get stuck in traffic and that figure can go down as the bike is just not charging the same.

Bottom line here is to check how much power the heated gear uses to start with, have a good voltmeter to monitor your charging volts, and switch off gear if it starts to tax the system.
Generally I'd say picking one piece of heated gear shouldn't be a problem. I ran driving lights that used 40w of power and only while idling was this maxing out the power. If I saw the volts drop I just turned them off.

If you've replaced some bulbs with LED's, in theory you can add up the total wattage of the lights you removed and add that to the 70w. Keep in mind a blinking turn light doesn't constantly use power, so not sure how to estimate that.
 

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I have a pair of Widder electric gloves I've had for 20 years. They still work great. I have rigged an off switch on the headlight high beam, so I can turn it off and use the power for stuff like heated gloves. I don't want to risk overloading that weak stator. Notice how Kawasaki set it up so the headlight won't come on until the engine starts.
 

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I only go out for what we call "Frozen Toe Rides" 2 0r 3 times each winter. I wear insulateed winter boots. And instead of laying out close to $200.00 for heated gloves I purchased lined deer hide mittens and a few bucks each ride for heat pads that work like a charm. Mittens work much better than fingered gloves that seperate each finger and don't get the benefit of the heat pads like mittens do. Am I a tightwad? You bet! I was raised during the dirty 30's
 

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I only go out for what we call "Frozen Toe Rides" 2 0r 3 times each winter. I wear insulateed winter boots. And instead of laying out close to $200.00 for heated gloves I purchased lined deer hide mittens and a few bucks each ride for heat pads that work like a charm. Mittens work much better than fingered gloves that seperate each finger and don't get the benefit of the heat pads like mittens do. Am I a tightwad? You bet! I was raised during the dirty 30's
Tightwad? No, just frugal. The only problem I see with the mittens is trying to use some of the buttons on the handle bars and other items one may have added on with their own power source. I have a set of speakers that use their own battery power and when plugged into my small music unit (also with self contained batteries) are great. For regular day trips there is no problem with having enough battery power in those units so I am not taxing my bike system
 

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Thanks for the suggestions. I like the idea of the removable ones, or the last ones that come with the grips. I sent them a question about the current draw. The removable ones claim very low curent draw but also state that they get very hot. That 3rd set you mentioned I believe would be the way to go if the curent draw is low enough.
 

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I never understood the idea behind heated grips. Obviously in freezing weather, you are going to be wearing heavy gloves. It seems like the gloves would act as a barrier to heat transfer from the grips ton your hands. Also, while you hands are inside the gloves, the heated grips are out in the cold. It seems like ice cold air blowing over them would carry away most of the heat they make. Heated gloves seem like a much better idea.
 

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..have a vulcan good day!
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I never understood the idea behind heated grips. Obviously in freezing weather, you are going to be wearing heavy gloves. It seems like the gloves would act as a barrier to heat transfer from the grips ton your hands. Also, while you hands are inside the gloves, the heated grips are out in the cold. It seems like ice cold air blowing over them would carry away most of the heat they make. Heated gloves seem like a much better idea.
With my Snowmobile, Grips allowed dismounting/remounting quick/easy w/o hassle of fumbling the electrical connector with (heated) gloved hands, while my hands stayed toasty all day/evening long (always Thinsulate Gloves/Mittens).

...just sayin'
:smiley_th

EDIT: Mostly 2up riding, we always carried extra Warm clothes and mittens.......Wife had heated Hold Grips
 

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Sparky!!!
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I never understood the idea behind heated grips. Obviously in freezing weather, you are going to be wearing heavy gloves. It seems like the gloves would act as a barrier to heat transfer from the grips ton your hands. Also, while you hands are inside the gloves, the heated grips are out in the cold. It seems like ice cold air blowing over them would carry away most of the heat they make. Heated gloves seem like a much better idea.
Even with Arctic mittens, sub Arctic liners, and a pair of thinsulate gloves, my hands would freeze when riding. I put on my heated grips, and haven't had cold hands since. I still wear all those layers of hand protection because threes grips will burn my hands through my normal riding gloves


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Hard to believe the grips could get that hot without consuming too much power, but if they do they do. I don't really care for gloves, and my electric gloves are thinner than most non electric gloves designed for extremely cold weather. In the summer, I wear very thin gloves, just to protect my hands from sunburn. I got frostbite from not wearing gloves back in the '80s (wasn't expecting it to get anywhere near as cold as it did) and had my hands roasted a couple of years later from taking a 1200 mile weekend trip over a July 4th weekend.
 

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There are a few insulated motorcycle gloves on the market that are made specificily to use with heated grips. They have thinner material on the palm
section and some have a thin layer of wire/metal? that conducts heat better.

Because of the design of our fingers...they can get cold very easy.... But conversely, it doesn't take much power to heat them.
 

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I bought some cheap heated gloves off eBay. They're from China but whatever. They're basically knitted fingerless gloves with a 3"x3" element velcro'd inside. They are wired to run off of USB. I'm gonna use a USB adapter that plugs into the cigarette lighter. I'm not sure what the current draw is but must be fairly low, USB is 5volts at around 1amp or less. I'm going to take the elements out of the knitted gloves and put them in my winter riding gloves. They seem to get about as warm as those hot hands packets. They were about $6 shipped.
 
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