Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
New to the 2 wheeled community! My name is Scott I'm from upstate NY! Bought my first bike which some of you have helped me get running a 92 kawasaki vulcan 750. I did unfortunately dump it the other day... not going fast at all around 5 mph or so. Bent the front fender and scratched it some. I was embarrassed! But rode it home. I'm thinking I need a lot of practice! Send good vibes this way!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,749 Posts
Have you taken an introductory rider course, such as those offered by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation? It's a good way to learn the basics of riding.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jason Pittenger

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Hey Scott, Welcome.
Definitely take an intro course if one is available near you, and get lots of practice on empty streets! Hope you didn't get banged up too bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Welcome Scott! Glad you're ok! I would also echo the safety course! Worth it! Stay safe out there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
Welcome to the machine!

5mph. Things can happen fast, even faster with more speed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
533 Posts
Welcome aboard. Sorry to hear you dropped the bike, all that matters though is that you didn’t get banged up bad in the process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for your well wishes guys! I agree I'm just glad I walked away with some scratches and a bruise. I did complete the motorcycle safety course last year. That's why I'm thinking I need more practice! I was gonna look for something almost like football cones so I could practice! Any helpful tips and tricks I'd be more then happy to listen!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
348 Posts
Maintain power to the rear wheel, though the forward motion may be slowed by slipping the clutch.
My tendency when I started riding again, was to freeze up when I sensed trouble, pull in the clutch all the way, squeeze the brake and.... the blke would lay down, which is just the opposite of what should be done.

When slow maneuvering and feeling the bike going over, you should maintain power to the rear wheel, maybe increasing the clutch engagement and give it some gas. The bike will stand right up.

Just be sure to be in a large enough space with no obstacles when practicing.

The key is to maintain power to the rear wheel. Never fully disengage the clutch unless intending to stop... or shifting gears.

When stopping, be sure the bars and front wheel are straight ahead. If turned, the bike will likely fall over as you come to a stop... that is unless you've got gorilla legs. Anticipate your stop so that your wheel is straight inline with the bike... every time.

When stopping, stop suddenly and deliberately by pulling in the clutch and braking hard...but not too hard...practice.

Brake hard, stop and put your foot or feet down. It becomes rhythmic after awhile.

When doing short turns, circles or figure eights, maintain some throttle. You don't want the bike stalling in a turn or it will go down.
Use some rear brake to fight the throttle and slow the bike down.

With the VN750, I got where I can do gentle circles and figure eights with clutch fully engaged, low throttle and just dragging the rear brake. Slower turns require slipping the clutch.

When starting off from a stop, practice easing the clutch out but give it deliberate throttle to give a faster start, instead of starting off slow and causing the bike to wobble. You'll feel like you've got better control of the bike that way. You can learn slow easing off starts later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Slow maneuvering was the worst for me when starting to ride. There's a certain speed as you accelerate where the bike suddenly shifts from "slow mode" to "fast mode" with regards to steering. Slow mode you have to lean your body away from the turn to balance the bike as it wants to fall into the turn. Fast mode is where you counter-steer and lean into the curve because the bike wants to stand up and go straight. Knowing when that change in handling methods is coming, and being able to start acting appropriately as the change happens is key to turning at intersections and small, back-country roads, etc.

Blowing your lane in an intersection is a common new-rider problem, and especially dangerous when making right hand turns since you end up in oncoming traffic. You'll likely be in "fast mode" by the time you're exiting the intersection, so you have to switch handling styles quickly as you pull away from the stop.

Counter-steering: your life depends on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
You can get as much thrill turning into the parking lot as you can carving the mountain to get there.

I practice keeping my feet on the pegs until I'm just barely moving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Wow guys this is awesome!!!! Thanks for all the tips and tricks! I'm thinking about riding up to the high school parking lot to practice steering and such! I am definitely gonna practice slow turns as well! Thanks again!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
If you live where there's snow, find out what snirt is and avoid it. It's out of season, but it will be back. 🙂
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
348 Posts
Oh yeah. If the bike is definitely going to fall, let it go, but get your leg out from under it fast. A 500 lb MC will pin you to the ground and if there's no one else around.... you're stuck. Better be wearing a helmet 'cause your head goes ker-whap on the pavement. First thing... turn the key off. Second thing, have a cell-phone on your upper body so you can call somebody to get that thing off of you. Oh and.. that muffler is hot on your ankle.

Ask me how I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
What in the heck is snirt? Lol


Also that's what happened to me. My leg got pinned under the bike but I was able to lift it up enough to get my leg out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
What in the heck is snirt? Lol


Also that's what happened to me. My leg got pinned under the bike but I was able to lift it up enough to get my leg out!
Ouch!

Snirt: snow+dirt=snirt

After the snow, all the sand and cinders are piled in the corners and intersections. Makes those off-season rides exciting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Maybe I'm gonna wait until I'm a lot more how shall I say more seasoned of a rider? Lol that just sounds like an accident waiting to happen! Lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Also watch for gravel that is kicked up from the shoulders from cars taking corners too tight. I came into a corner too fast and tried to brake hard to make the corner. My front tire hit gravel and I was pavement surfing before I could react! https://www.vn750.com/forum/11-vn750-general-discussion/103003-first-wipeout.html#post1266639

Last week I was making a left turn from a T intersection into cross traffic that didn't have a stop sign. My back tire hit gravel in the center lane and fishtailed out slightly. I recovered just fine, but it definitely made my heart rate spike!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
Maybe I'm gonna wait until I'm a lot more how shall I say more seasoned of a rider? Lol that just sounds like an accident waiting to happen! Lol
There's a game I play every time I ride. How Many Wrecks Did I Avoid Today?

There's always a score, driver on cellphone, driver on heroin, dead skunk in the middle of the road, live/dead deer in ...... See what I mean?

People say to ride like everyone is out to get you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
When I took the course that's what they told us. Ride like everyone is out to get you. That one stuck with me! Also dress for the fall! When your fishtailing a bike how do you save it? Is it the same for a car?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
When I took the course that's what they told us. Ride like everyone is out to get you. That one stuck with me! Also dress for the fall! When your fishtailing a bike how do you save it? Is it the same for a car?
In my case, it self recovered. By the time I realized what was happening, the tire regained grip. I can't really say I did anything, other than get lucky.

IN THEORY, releasing the throttle or pulling in the clutch could make things worse! A sudden regain of traction could throw you over the opposite direction you were sliding! So my THEORY is that gently reducing throttle should gently restore you. Acceleration in a corner tends to righten and straighten you. I don't see any value in applying either brake in this situation.

Last year, I had my bike misfire under hard acceleration in a corner and it caused it to dive tighter into the corner, but it came right back up when the engine recovered. Incidentally, it was the exact same corner that my fishtail happened at! I would consider a different route, but the rest of the route is just so darn enjoyable to ride!
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top