Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Drive less, ride more...
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
....in 2011, Everybody!

Judging by the weather of late, it appears that (as of this writing, anyway) this year's riding season has basically already started (at least in some parts of the lower 48 states).

I hope everybody else out there has a safe, fun--and mainly crash free--riding season this year...:beerchug:...!

To that end, I'd like to submit the following video as food for thought:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSQJP40PcGI

Unfortunately, it's each rider's total responsibility for his/her own personal safety while riding. This is of course especially true if you are a spouse--and even more so if you are a parent (with any kids still living at home).

Since a main threat to each of us is a world full of distracted cell phone users, texters and other multi-tasking drivers, I'd like to encourage each of you (after viewing the above video) to think about what you wear whenever you ride (like maybe fluorescent colored and/or reflective gear), and also what accessories you might add to your bike if you haven't already (for instance...fork-mounted driving lights, additional LED marker lights front and rear, or additional/strobing LED brake lights)....that would better "grab" others' attention--and basically put them in a "ha--made you look" situation.

A number of us here on this forum have proven that our Vulcan's charging system actually has enough spare capacity to handle some additional LED lights...and also driving lights...assuming that these extra lights aren't overdone.

Obviously, I don't think anyone who reads this really wants to be the basic equivalent of the "bear" while in traffic.

Nothing (thus far, anyway) works 100% of the time--and always positioning your bike where others can best see you is also incredibly important--but my real point here is that a rider can be very proactive in doing a number of different things to help ensure others truly see you and are less likely to cut you off (or even hit you) in traffic.

One easy example: the extra effort to put on an inexpensive fluorescent safety vest is far easier and cheaper than a trip to the hospital (or worse) simply because someone else "didn't see you" in time.

Anyway, just some food for thought...as we begin this year's riding season.
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
The first time I saw that video, about 2 years ago, I missed the bear the first time through.
Food for thought folks. It is easy to miss seeing something we don`t expect to see.

I believe it was a study in New Zealand showed that motorcyclists who were wearing a white helmet or a Hi-Viz jacket/vest, experienced about 35% fewer accidents. So clothing and additional lights may help us be more noticeable, but ultimately our safety relys on our awareness and riding tactics.
 

·
Daily rider
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
It's not really a valid test of awareness. You were viewing a video - it's not 3 dimensional. If you were there in person you might have seen the bear, because you have an increased field of vision. Also, you were asked to count how many passes the white team made. You were concentrating solely on that one thing. When driving, I'm constantly scanning side-to-side, then looking in my rear view mirrors. It's far from an apples to apples comparison.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10 Posts
excellent point this time of year drivers are even less aware of bikes i live in the myrtle beach area. already seen a couple of crashes. your video really made me think did not see the bear at all plus missed a pass thanks for bringing this topic up
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,860 Posts
It's not really a valid test of awareness. You were viewing a video - it's not 3 dimensional. If you were there in person you might have seen the bear, because you have an increased field of vision. Also, you were asked to count how many passes the white team made. You were concentrating solely on that one thing. When driving, I'm constantly scanning side-to-side, then looking in my rear view mirrors. It's far from an apples to apples comparison.
Sounds to me like someone missed the bear.....;)

Actually it is a fair test, but of course not all inclusive when speaking about riding a motorcycle.
The fact that you are constantly scanning for stuff and concentrating on more than just one thing......means it is very easy to miss something you were not looking for. Big stuff like bears...yeah, you'd see that. But as your searching for those large things like cars , bears, dogs, deer and such means you might not notice something small...like a stone or pot hole on road right in front of you.

Also if in fact you are concentrating on many things at a time ...it is easier to get distracted by one thing and miss another.

KM
 

·
Git-R-Done!
Joined
·
282 Posts
Slim, that is EXACLTY the advice I was given when I started riding, and I honestly believe it has saved my life a number of times. I can't even count the number of times I have looked right at someone, and they have looked RIGHT AT me and still turned in front of me, or something of the like. It was only those words bouncing around in my head - "I'm invisible, they can't really see me... I'm invisible" that prompted me to ride in a manner that allowed me to avoid them. Lord knows, they weren't going to avoid me - that is, if they even saw me.

And to theauhawk, thanks for the post. My personal opinion is that, at the very least, everyone ought to wear some kind of helmet. I know, I know - it's a matter of 'preference'. I myself have always worn one. And after having a good friend dump his Indian late last year, wearing no helmet, and suffering severe head trauma, I am convinced that I make a good decision every time I wear one.

He had no other significant injuries, and if he had been wearing some kind of head protection, he probably would have gone home the same day. As it was, he spent almost 2 months in the hospital, and there was some question as to whether he would ever fully recover his mental capacity. By the grace of God he has, and is still on the road to a full recovery.

I guess the way I see it is, given the fact that there is something out there that can protect my head in case I go down, why would I not wear it? Certainly comfort is not a big enough concern when compared to the ability to eat, drink, think, laugh, or exhibit consciousness of a higher level. And even when I can talk myself beyond all of that, I look at my kids and think, "is it fair to them to risk the chance that they have to take care of me - feed me, change my diapers, etc. - for the rest of my life because I wanted to be more 'comfortable'?" The answer in my head always comes back the same, and I gladly put my helmet on.

Again, this is not to start a flame war, and if you choose not to wear a helmet, I respect your right to make your own choice. I'm merely explaining the logic behind mine.

In any case, happy riding all. Remember to always ride safe, and remember - YOU ARE INVISIBLE!


AZ Kev
 

·
Drive less, ride more...
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Can you "SEE" trouble b4 it happens?

In the spirit of riding like one is "invisible"...I thought the following would prove helpful.

In order to ride like invisible, it obviously helps a lot if the rider can spot developing situations before the ensuing "trap" closes. To practice looking for potentially hazardous conditions, I'll submit the following link....it's actually kinda fun to work thru:

http://www.msf-usa.org/riderperception/

"SEE" = Search, then Evaluate, then Execute
 

·
Git-R-Done!
Joined
·
282 Posts
Great link!

Auhawk, that is a really cool link, and it is actually fun to go through the test - thanks! I totally agree too, that part of the whole thing is being completely aware of potential traps and always having a strategy, an "out" planned.

In fact, on the way to work this morning, I was in the middle lane on the freeway, and a guy in a beemer merged onto the road, and decided to keep coming right on over to the lane I was in. :doh:

Fortunately, I was completely anticipating it happening, sped up slightly, and dodged left to avoid him hitting me and layed on the horn. It was obvious he never even saw me by the look of surprise on his face. Because I "knew" I was invisible, I avoided an unpleasant situation and made it to work safe and sound.

Ride safe all - always :smiley_th


AZ Kev
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
In the spirit of riding like one is "invisible"...I thought the following would prove helpful.

In order to ride like invisible, it obviously helps a lot if the rider can spot developing situations before the ensuing "trap" closes. To practice looking for potentially hazardous conditions, I'll submit the following link....it's actually kinda fun to work thru:

http://www.msf-usa.org/riderperception/

"SEE" = Search, then Evaluate, then Execute
I can get the link on a small window, but it goes black when I click the full screen box. Anybody else having this problem?

Hmmm... I wonder if the msf-usa link won`t work in Canada.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I really hate when I hear people say "I didn't see them". I mentioned that to a friend recently and he recounted a recent experience where he was at a tee in the road, waiting to pull out with his truck. He looked left, looked right,looked left again then started to pull out. He stopped before he went too far, one of those seemingly "he came out of nowhere" motorcyclists. He realized though that he was looking 50 plus yards down the road, not 10 yards where the motorcycle was. I think that unless something is in your direct line of sight you miss too much on the periphery. I think the brain makes false assumptions about what appears in your peripheral vision and writes it off as anything but an obstacle or hazard. I don't believe most people look directly at their entry point then scan towards either direction, they shortcut the process and too often miss what is right before them. Anytime I approach an entry point to my line of travel i have my thumb on the horn button, and even flash my high beams at times. I got used to riding with two fingers always on the front brake lever as well, unless I am literally in the middle of nowhere.

You never know when something strange will happen. He'll, years ago I got hit in my car by a horse. Didn't hurt the horse but it dented my passenger door in and flattened the antenna against the windshield pillar. In this case it literally did come out of nowhere...leapt a fence to get across the road to it's owner who was waving a handfulnof carrots. Imagine my surprise seeing her doing that, wondering "what in the world" then WHAM, a horse"
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top