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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2002 VN. I have done every mod to it that I have read about here!!
Now I don't feel scared to ride it more than a mile!! Ha Ha

OK. now I've been reading about fusing the Stator wires. Do you still think it's a good idea? The lastest fuse size seems to be a 10 or 7.5 amp?

Anybody have a picture of where they fused the wires?

Thanks guys.........you are the best:motorcycl
 

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The Professor
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I have a 2002 VN. I have done every mod to it that I have read about here!!
Now I don't feel scared to ride it more than a mile!! Ha Ha

OK. now I've been reading about fusing the Stator wires. Do you still think it's a good idea? The lastest fuse size seems to be a 10 or 7.5 amp?

Anybody have a picture of where they fused the wires?

Thanks guys.........you are the best:motorcycl
I have never thought it was a good idea and still don't. :beerchug:

Fused Stator Disaster

http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3462&highlight=fused+stator
 

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I have never thought it was a good idea and still don't. :beerchug:

Fused Stator Disaster

http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3462&highlight=fused+stator
I am definitely with Lance on this subject,the smartest move you can make if you want to make sure you have good connections on your stator wires is to do away with the bullet connectors and solder and shrink wrap the connections,this will ensure solid connections and if you have to replace the stator,cutting the three wires loose is a small matter.Or at the very least make sure the connectors are clean and use dielectric grease and make sure they are tight,and not a source of heat themselves.
 

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I also have to agree with Lance, fusing the stator wires would result in running the stator with no load if a fuse blew, definitely not a good thing. One thing I do recommend, If you do it right, is removing the bullet connectors from the 3 yellow stator wires, and soldering the wires directly together. This must be done right for 2 reasons. One, you sure don't want one of those connections coming loose, and two, you do not want to increase the resistance at this connection. So you need a good solid connection, with no broken wire strands. I use a lighter and my thumb and fore finger to remove the insulation, instead of wire strippers, to make sure I don't break a single strand of wire (I used to install car stereos, and always stripped wires this way, to avoid breaking the fragile stranded wire. You heat the insulation till it is really soft, then just pull it off). Make sure the soldered joint is done right. I found the insulation on the wires near the bullet connectors had hardened due to heat, which is always due to high resistance, and figured a bad connection at the connectors was the cause. While pulling the connectors apart, one actually broke off. Apparently there was enough heat to even damage the wire itself. I slipped clear plastic tubing over the soldered connections, so I can keep an eye on them. Jerry.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
WOW!
I'm really surprised at the answers I'm getting here!
Sure am glad I asked the question before I fused it.
Your word is the Law with me and thanks again for the thoughts.:lockd::smiley_th
 

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I put fuses in when I replaced my stator. When motor goes back in this time, no fuses, just soldered conenctions with shrink wrap.

Jon
 
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