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Discussion Starter #1
If its not one thing, its another!!! I couldn't get the fuel lines off the petcock this past winter. I was in a hurry, so I just cut them. Figured it would be a little work to replace later, but not a big deal. I was right. This past weekend I got new lines installed rather easily, thanks to a very slender long pair of pliars. Today I was sliding on clamps and realized that the fuel line connection point on the back carb is cracked. Not sure if I cracked it getting the old line off or the new line on. Either way, I have a few questions....

I'm guessing I need to pull the air box to get the carb out so I can replace the damn thing?

It looks like that hose barb is actually part of a larger piece that I would have to buy, rather than just that little piece, right?

New, that larger piece is 215$. So, does anyone have a busted carb they want to part out to me?

Or is there a fix here that doesn't involve taking the carb off and replacing the whole damn thing?

And why is that damn connection made of plastic?!
 

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there is a fuel inlet from a harley carb that works great, and I think its brass too.. someone will chime in with all the info I am sure.

I would imagine that at a minimum you need to pull tank off and airbox if you still have it. not sure tho, carbs may need to come out to change the inlets
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks! I will take a look at all that when I get to a computer. I'm glad to know that I only need to replace the inlet! Just to clarify, I will need to remove the air box and the carb to get at that inlet? I am guessing the ear removal posts explain how to remove the air box?

Its still more work than I want to do, but at least it's way cheaper than I thought!
 

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To get the airbox out in one piece, you have to disconnect all the harness plugs under the seat and pull the harness forward out of the frame. Then you can flex and pull the airbox rearward and out above the battery. It just won't go with the wiring harness in place.

Good news is, each harness plug will only fit in one place on it's matching plug or component. Have to be really careful if the plugs are brittle.

You could opt to just remove the carbs, which is a real bear with the airbox in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey Spockster, I read your "One Piece Airbox/Surge Tank Removal-no cutting" post. seems pretty straight forward. I'm not sure what all that stuff is exactly, but I'm pretty good at taking things apart! :grin2:

Once I get the carbs off, I'm guessing i need to drill out the brass nub that the plastic inlet attaches to? Then the new inlet is just a pressure fit? Do I need to add some permatex or something?

Thanks for all the help!
 

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I wouldn't use sealer, it migrates into the carb and makes big trouble later.

The new one is press-fit, and the nub has to come out. Just the right sized bolt might thread in and pull it out, or carefully drill it without cutting the carb body.
 

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Learned a trick recently while trying to remove brake bleeder valves that might help here ... stick in a drill bit the same size as the hole, then use vice grips on the outside of the nipple to pull it out. The bit works to keep the nipple from collapsing and breaking off. Possibly safer than trying to drill it out if you can get it to move.
 

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Yeah... and drilling will likely get chips in th' carburetor.

I recommend using the shank end of the drill bit with Thorn's technique.
When squeezing the flute end, it's easy to break off chips from the drill.
A soft bolt or correct size round stock would work good, too.

Of course with drill bits, one has more varied size selection.
 

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Definitely need to be surgical, don't want to gouge or enlarge the hole at all.

Try Thorn's idea first if there's something to grab on to.

If you drill, find the correct size and drill straight in.

Sometimes you can catch an edge with side cutters, then twist and pull. If the brass collapses, the diameter gets smaller/ looser.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't power drill at all, unless I could set it up in a milling machine and end-mill it out. Hand drills tend to do more than you intended.

An 'easy-out' is an option, if there is nothing left of the nipple protruding.

One would need to be cautious not to drive the easy-out in to the hole too hard and expand the aluminum hole.

I prefer the flat square tapered type easy-outs. They're not hardened as much as the spiral or scalloped square ones, which tend to snap off easily. Plus, the square ones can be twisted in both directions, unlike the spiral ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Learned a trick recently while trying to remove brake bleeder valves that might help here ... stick in a drill bit the same size as the hole, then use vice grips on the outside of the nipple to pull it out. The bit works to keep the nipple from collapsing and breaking off. Possibly safer than trying to drill it out if you can get it to move.
That's actually a really good tip. Thanks Thorn! I have been doing some research on here. There is just so much info here that going through it all takes forever. One of the threads I found included comments from our good friend Wolfie. He gave a link to a Harley how-to site that showed how they pulled the old fitting out. It does involve drilling, but not all the way down. I still have all of the brass part of the original fitting. So I could follow the Harley instructions. However, I think I am going to see if I can get it to come out with Thorn's tip first. (Doc, you are not allowed to comment on that last sentence! :wink2:)

I did get the airbox and carbs out yesterday. Spock, I don't know how you got the airbox out in 15 minutes!? It took me that long just to find all the electrical connections I needed to unplug. Then another 30+ to get the damn thermostat off. That's mainly because everything is corroded/oxidized and the hoses were stuck. Then another 20 screwing with the airbox. I was beginning to think you made it up. So then I said F*ck it, and I yanked the sh*t out of it and it finally came out....in one piece. I have no idea how I am going to get it to go back in though? The carb ducts are a huge pain. I have read a few things on here about how to go about it, but none seem fun. :frown2:

On the bright side, after the airbox was gone, the carbs came out in about 5 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
UPDATE

I got the inlet replaced and everything back on the bike. Replacing the inlets was by far the easiest part. I tried Thorn's idea first. It did stop the nipple from collapsing, but the brass was so soft it was falling apart from the vice-grips. Plus the inlet was in there tight! So I couldn't move it around anyway. So I tried the other method. The inlet came out very easy....like a hot knife through butter, my father would say. No drilling needed. The brass is so soft you can thread it with a 1/4"-20 tap by hand. You only need 2 or 3 threads. You do need to hold the carbs so the inlet is upside down when you do it or you will get shavings all in the floats. Then you take a nut and thread it all the way up a 1/4"-20 bolt, slide a fender washer on after that. Then stick the bolt through a large deep well socket. thread the bolt in to the brass and then start un-threading the nut. It pulls the inlet right out!

Now getting the new inlets in was a small pain. I put them on ice for a few hours. Then right before I started working with them I hit them with some compressed air. You know the kind you blow off your keyboard with? Well when you turn it upside down, you get cold liquid air. Be careful. I burned my fingertip a little and it was numb for a while! Anyway, that kept them very cold long enough for me to hit them with a big hammer.

Getting the carbs back in was easy too. The massively huge pain in my a** was getting that airbox back in. I was positive to wouldn't go in. I was about ready call Spock a lying liar who lies! :grin2: However, I am here to say, Spock is not a liar and it can be done! I strongly suggest having 2 people! And just like Spock said, hooking everything else back up was super easy. Even getting the carb hoses back on was easy. I did punch myself in the face trying to get the duct back in to the left air filter.... i don't suggest doing that!
 
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So... you designed, built and successfully used a miniature sleeve puller.

Well done, Drew!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So... you designed, built and successfully used a miniature sleeve puller.

Well done, Drew!
haha! My spidey sense is picking up sarcasm! Or maybe thats just me....or this forum. either way, I laughed. :smile2: But yes, that is what I did.

I can't take full credit though. I stole the idea from another thread. Figured explaining it again might help someone in the near future. Not everyone here grew up in an automotive shop, like I did. So I am guessing there are a fair number of members that maybe don't know what a sleeve puller is.

Luckily there is no black eye. I thought I gave myself a bloody nose when it first happened. My nose and face were a little sore that night, but that's it. :cool:
 
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Sarcasm on VN750.com? NEVER (he says sarcastically

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