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Discussion Starter #1
With my bike close to ready to start up I am going to look at my other obvious non-ridable issue...front brakes. I have done a little with car breaks but by no means a regular. My brakes seem to be stuck on. The brake handle is loose meaning I can apply pressure and let go but its like there are no brakes yet the front tire is very tough to move which makes pushing the bike quite difficult. Now for any new readers that haven't been keeping up with me in the cards forums, this bike has been sitting for 2 years.

I just got the master cylinder open on the handlebars. The screws were so brittle that they were stripping as I tried to remove the screws. I ended up drilling the heads off and using easy-outs to remove the screw base. I know I need to add brake fluid as it is quite low but do I need to remove the brakes and clean everything up? They are quite rusty. Would that be the main cause that it seems to be stuck with the brakes applied or is it something else?
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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IMO, your best bet would be to rebuild the master cylinder and calipers.

What did the fluid look like once ya got the cover off? Was it really brown looking?
 

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IMO, your best bet would be to rebuild the master cylinder and calipers.

What did the fluid look like once ya got the cover off? Was it really brown looking?
I know that's just what you wanted to hear ("Oh, no, another job before I can ride!"), but Hyper's probably right. If they've been sitting that long, the brakes, MC, and lines need to be tidied up. I'd drain the lines, then pull the calipers off and clean those up. Make sure you've still go brake pads, too....

It's a drag (no pun intended), but you don't get a second chance with your front brakes. Might as well give 'em the once- and twice-over!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Suprisingly enough the break fluid was looking fine but there is no second chance with brakes. I figured I would need to pull them and clean them and drain and refill the fluid. The rear seem fine but once I get it running smooth and the front ones done I will go and check them and test them as well.
 

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Suprisingly enough the break fluid was looking fine but there is no second chance with brakes. I figured I would need to pull them and clean them and drain and refill the fluid. The rear seem fine but once I get it running smooth and the front ones done I will go and check them and test them as well.
You have a drum brake in the rear - check your Clymer's for tolerances on how much of the drum needs to be left; and get some CRC Brake Cleaner and a breathing mask (for real) - probably lots and lots and lots of brake dust in there, and getting rid of that mess could significantly improve performance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I haven't gotten to the rear brakes yet but they are working nicely. The front was fun but not too tough. We bled the break lines first. The right side wasn't too bad, a little air in the line but that went quick. The fluid was a little brown but not bad. The left side has a lot of air in it. Once the left side was done I hade good pressure back in the line again. Then we went to the calipers. They were stuck in the closed position and and the pads were very rusty. I opted for new pads and we removed the old ones and used a c-clamp to opent he pistons up, replaced the pads and front breaks in nice working order. Not nearly as tough as I had thought it might be.
 
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