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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed this from the beginning but since the bike still seems to roll with no resistance, I assumed it was normal, but it may not be. I apologize for the bad pictures, I took them with my phone.

Here are two pictures of the front brake pads/calipers. They seems to be always in contact with the rotors and when I squeeze the lever, while I do get a smooth squeeze, I never see the calipers move. My brake fluid level also seems to be low. Since I'm VERY poor right now I can't do anything about it for now but that's ok, the bike will be sitting in place for the next 2 months or so while I wait for license and registration and insurance. All I do is go out and start it up and try to fix little problems.

Does this look normal to you?

The PO suggested i flush the brakes...is that done by simply bleeding until the "new fluid" comes out such as in a car? thanks!



 

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CWO3 Navy (Retired)
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If I'm seeing the sight glass correctly, you are beyond low. You may have air in the master cylinder. I just rebuilt my entire front brake system including rebuilding the master cylinder. The pads look ok and rotors don't look bad from what I see. Check all the union bolts for leaks, your fluid should not be that low, you must be losing it somewhere. Replacing is basically bleeding the old out and adding new as you go until the new comes out. It's not hard and even easier if you get a set of speed bleeders (cyclebrakes.com has them very check about $10 plus $5 shipping for 2). I have them and won't be without them anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
you are seeing that correctly and it is beyond low though if i shake the handlebars, there is a little sliver of fluid in the sight glass. when i get the money to ill get some brake fluid and flush the system. is it possible that the pads will be forced back out once air is purged from the system?
 

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The pads are supposed to look like that. They normaly when not being "applied" are just barely touching the rotor. It is almost impossible to see movement in them when you squeeze the brakes.This is how they work.


The key diffrence of course is in the amount of pressure, or force , they are excerting on the disc. When not being applied, they are not putting any pressure against the disc and the wheel can rotate freely. Sometimes you might even hear them scrape a bit, but they should not be putting any significant drag on the wheel.

Squeeze the lever hard and because of the mechinical advantage you can be applying thousands of pounds of force to the disc. This is what makes the bike slow down and stop of course.

You should NOT RIDE THE BIKE UNTIL YOU PROPERLY BLEED THE BRAKES AND REPLACE WITH FRESH BRAKE FLUID.

Sorry, not wishing to yell, but we already had a member get his ass tossed off his bike when the brakes locked up by themselve while he was riding due to water/air in the system :
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8701


So , yes the pads look fine, but get your brakes bled ASAP.

KM
 

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What KM said!! Don't rely on the rear brakes only since 2/3 of your braking power comes from the front brakes. I had a hard time with this since when I rode dirt bikes, you never, ever touched the front brakes unless you wanted to be thrown over the handlebars. Once I figured out the front brakes are your friend, I also learned that it's very important to keep them serviced properly. A can of DOT 3 or 4 brake fluid is less than $10 or one tank of gas.
 

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The pads are supposed to look like that. They normaly when not being "applied" are just barely touching the rotor. It is almost impossible to see movement in them when you squeeze the brakes.This is how they work.


The key diffrence of course is in the amount of pressure, or force , they are excerting on the disc. When not being applied, they are not putting any pressure against the disc and the wheel can rotate freely. Sometimes you might even hear them scrape a bit, but they should not be putting any significant drag on the wheel.

Squeeze the lever hard and because of the mechinical advantage you can be applying thousands of pounds of force to the disc. This is what makes the bike slow down and stop of course.

You should NOT RIDE THE BIKE UNTIL YOU PROPERLY BLEED THE BRAKES AND REPLACE WITH FRESH BRAKE FLUID.

Sorry, not wishing to yell, but we already had a member get his ass tossed off his bike when the brakes locked up by themselve while he was riding due to water/air in the system :
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8701


So , yes the pads look fine, but get your brakes bled ASAP.

KM
What KM said!! Don't rely on the rear brakes only since 2/3 of your braking power comes from the front brakes. I had a hard time with this since when I rode dirt bikes, you never, ever touched the front brakes unless you wanted to be thrown over the handlebars. Once I figured out the front brakes are your friend, I also learned that it's very important to keep them serviced properly. A can of DOT 3 or 4 brake fluid is less than $10 or one tank of gas.
What they said. :smiley_th

Put the bike on the center stand on level ground and straighten the bars to get the MC level as possible. The front system is pretty small, you can have it flush, refilled and bled in about 30 minutes if you've ever done anything like it before. There are several posts on the forums, and in the Verses on "how to".
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for all the info guys. the brake fluid is very low and i'm going to flush the whole system, it's just a matter of when i can afford the fluid plus the bleeders (be it manual or automatic). i've flushed car brakes a few times before so i'm assuming the concept is the same here.

no worries though, since i just bought the bike, it has very expired tags on it, i dont have insurance or even the title in my name yet...i just sent away all the paperwork, so its not getting driven, only started up and whatnot.

thanks again!
 

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The bike is nice 'cause you can reach the bleeder with one hand, while working the brake lever with the other. (can't do that in a car ;) )

And you can pick up a small bottle of Valvoline, (others too I'm sure) synthetic fluid for about 5 or 6 bucks. And you'll likely have some left over. (depending on how much flushing you do)

I did my 2 or 3 more times after it was evident that new fluid was coming out and still had left over.

Anyway, that'll get you back to safe brakes pretty cheap if you can swing it. Good luck, and let us know how you do. :)
 

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The bike is nice 'cause you can reach the bleeder with one hand, while working the brake lever with the other. (can't do that in a car ;) )

And you can pick up a small bottle of Valvoline, (others too I'm sure) synthetic fluid for about 5 or 6 bucks. And you'll likely have some left over. (depending on how much flushing you do)

I did my 2 or 3 more times after it was evident that new fluid was coming out and still had left over.

Anyway, that'll get you back to safe brakes pretty cheap if you can swing it. Good luck, and let us know how you do. :)
I`m not sure what that Valveoline Synthetic brake fluid is Doug.:confused:
There is a warning in the Clymer manual about NOT USING SILICON BRAKE FLUID which is DOT 5. As already mentioned I believe, we should only use DOT3 or DOT4 brake fluid.

Could you double check that bottle, 750DOUG, and let us know for sure it is compatible with our bikes. Don`t want you or someone else to get hurt over a little mistake. Peace and safe riding to all.:rockon:
 
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