Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone help me understand fork alignment? I've read and heard of a lot of people having this done. The reason I ask is because when I take off the front wheel and the fender, the lower part of my forks turn easily by hand with the upper still clamped onto the tree. Is this normal? Is there something wrong with my fork? Or is alignment something else? I'm rebuilding my forks right now (one side at a time) and I can't seem to get the allen bolt out. When I turn it, everything inside the fork turns with it. Thanks
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
I've never had any troubles when re-installing the wheel.
Once the axle bolt goes in, everything is straight.
Only other thing I can think of for any kind of alignment is making sure both forks are at the same level in the triple clamp.
The lower part of the fork will turn. That is normal.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,817 Posts
The bottom of the fork leg can turn independant of the upper tube. Not a problem.

"Fork Alignment" is really just making sure the two tubes are perfectly parallel. All this means on our bikes , to add to Hypers statement, is you put the axel in and tighten it all down...then loosen up the pinch bolts and then re-torque them. This allows any flex to to be relieved.

Some times the forks get "tweaked" meaning they get a slight twist to them, usualy after a fall. The wheel seems to point opposite the way the top part of the tubes seem to be facing. A quick shove the other way holding the tire still should fix it.

Lastly there is front fork allignment to the rear wheel. Given the design of our bike there ain't much one can do to adjust that, and it usualy falls under "rear wheel alignment" not "fork" alignment.

As how to check the first one...just assemble the forks leaving out the springs, install the front wheel , axle , tighten everything down..."relax" the pinch bolts as described above , and with help from someone else, slowly lift the wheel up and down making sure it does not bind anywhere. This is very important to do when installing a fork brace, but given the limited amount of travel our forks have, it's a bit difficult to feel anything out of whack. Then all that should be left is installing the fork springs, spacer, fork oil and the fork "plug" and circlip.

The only fork alignment you really have to worry about is from the plate to your mouth.


KM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info on alignment. I was just a little concerned because my 750 is an '86 and I thought some internal part might have been worn out or broken. I'm still dealing with problems getting those dumb allen screws out. This is the second time that I've rebuilt my fork and the first time I had no problem getting the screws out. I tried to make the tool above but I must not have the right size bolts.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top