Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I dont know how many of you do this, but i carry a small air compressor in a box, with tire plug repair kit.
It will get you out of a bind if you are out there and you get stranded.
I soldered a cigarette lighter outlet to the outlet in the right side cover panel there, where the 2 wires are for miscalanous use.
Compressor was about $20.00.
I got stranded once, and i can say, that unless you have a trailer or pick-up truck with ramps, it can be quite a chore.
I think that it is worth the small amout of space that it takes up.
The plugs do work, however they dont reccomend it for a fix, get you home though.
However i did ride mine on a plug for 9000 miles.:smiley_th
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
I dont know how many of you do this, but i carry a small air compressor in a box, with tire plug repair kit.
It will get you out of a bind if you are out there and you get stranded.
I soldered a cigarette lighter outlet to the outlet in the right side cover panel there, where the 2 wires are for miscalanous use.
Compressor was about $20.00.
I got stranded once, and i can say, that unless you have a trailer or pick-up truck with ramps, it can be quite a chore.
I think that it is worth the small amout of space that it takes up.
The plugs do work, however they dont reccomend it for a fix, get you home though.
However i did ride mine on a plug for 9000 miles.:smiley_th
I extended my AAA to cover my VN750, towing included. I just have to make sure that AAA sends a flatbed that can handle a bike (i.e., with tie downs), when I call (haven't had to yet). Also, I've been told by another biker to clean the tires after it has been on one of these flatbeds, because they are usually soaked with oil and antifreeze.
 

·
Old Twistie Sticks Rider
Joined
·
5,072 Posts
Mastertech, glad you brought it up, I have the plugs and a large C0/2 thing and it is old and needs to be replaced... I did the same with a cigarette lighter outlet to use with my trickle charger and cell phone, GPS, whatever, now maybe I should get a small compressor...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
A small compressor is very handy old dog, i would trust that over c02, besides you can keep airing it up if you need to.:beerchug:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
508 Posts
Had over 5K on a tire plug with my previous bike. People asked me if I were nuts but if correctly installed plugs work fine.
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
I keep a plug kit in my toolbag, along with a small hand pump.
If on a long ride, I disassembled one of those small air compressors so all I have is just the compressor..... without the plastic housing all around it.
Takes up very little room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
I keep a plug kit in my toolbag, along with a small hand pump.
If on a long ride, I disassembled one of those small air compressors so all I have is just the compressor..... without the plastic housing all around it.
Takes up very little room.
Hey Hyper --

On my bicycle I carry a small hand pump. Will a small bicycle hand pump work on a motorcycle? If so, that's probably the best way to go!

Thanx!
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
Hey Hyper --

On my bicycle I carry a small hand pump. Will a small bicycle hand pump work on a motorcycle? If so, that's probably the best way to go!

Thanx!
Sure, it'll work. But it will also take awhile to get the tire aired up good.

I had a hand pump that also was a CO² pump. On my dirtbike it'd take 3 CO² cartridges to fill it (maybe 20psi). On the Vulcan, 3 would get it started, then a few minutes of pumping to top it off.
Without the CO², I'd expect it might take 5-10 minutes of pumping to fill the rear tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Sure, it'll work. But it will also take awhile to get the tire aired up good.

I had a hand pump that also was a CO² pump. On my dirtbike it'd take 3 CO² cartridges to fill it (maybe 20psi). On the Vulcan, 3 would get it started, then a few minutes of pumping to top it off.
Without the CO², I'd expect it might take 5-10 minutes of pumping to fill the rear tire.
Looks like the best bet is a combination of hand pump + CO2 cartridges.

Thanx Hyper!
 

·
Old Twistie Sticks Rider
Joined
·
5,072 Posts
Looks like the best bet is a combination of hand pump + CO2 cartridges.Thanx Hyper!
OldFlaRider, that hand pumping might be better for the younger riders, I think I may go more with the CO2 or battery operated pump...:rockon:...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
OldFlaRider, that hand pumping might be better for the younger riders, I think I may go more with the CO2 or battery operated pump...:rockon:...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
I think you've got a good point, Old Dog! The bicycle pumps up pretty fast but I would think the moto would take longer with more effort. I have always carried CO2 and even as a last resort a can of pressurized slime that seals the flat and inflates the tire -- although I've never had to use it.

Regards
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
I think you've got a good point, Old Dog! The bicycle pumps up pretty fast but I would think the moto would take longer with more effort. I have always carried CO2 and even as a last resort a can of pressurized slime that seals the flat and inflates the tire -- although I've never had to use it.

Regards
Slime is not what you want to use. Makes for a real mess when it comes time to change the tire.
Many here recommend Ride-On, although it's not pressurized.
So...... it's probably best to go with as tiny of a compressor as you can find. Like I said, I took the plastic housing off the one I had and made it a heck of alot smaller than the entire unit was. It started out about 10" long, 6" high and 6" wide. After disassembly, it was about 6"long, 4"high and 3" wide. (not including the filler hose & electrical plug, which were about 6" long and 2' long, respectively)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
Tire slim will throw your tires out of balance. I used it in some of my atvs, but when I got the one that went faster, left it out. You won't notice it when you're riding on a rough trail, but on a smooth surface, and above 30 mph, it will start shaking.
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
I dont know how many of you do this, but i carry a small air compressor in a box, with tire plug repair kit.
It will get you out of a bind if you are out there and you get stranded.
I soldered a cigarette lighter outlet to the outlet in the right side cover panel there, where the 2 wires are for miscalanous use.
Compressor was about $20.00.
I got stranded once, and i can say, that unless you have a trailer or pick-up truck with ramps, it can be quite a chore.
I think that it is worth the small amout of space that it takes up.
The plugs do work, however they dont reccomend it for a fix, get you home though.
However i did ride mine on a plug for 9000 miles.:smiley_th
Mastertech, glad you brought it up, I have the plugs and a large C0/2 thing and it is old and needs to be replaced... I did the same with a cigarette lighter outlet to use with my trickle charger and cell phone, GPS, whatever, now maybe I should get a small compressor...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
A small compressor is very handy old dog, i would trust that over c02, besides you can keep airing it up if you need to.:beerchug:
Hey Hyper --

On my bicycle I carry a small hand pump. Will a small bicycle hand pump work on a motorcycle? If so, that's probably the best way to go!
Thanx!
Sure, it'll work. But it will also take awhile to get the tire aired up good.
I had a hand pump that also was a CO² pump. On my dirtbike it'd take 3 CO² cartridges to fill it (maybe 20psi). On the Vulcan, 3 would get it started, then a few minutes of pumping to top it off.
Without the CO², I'd expect it might take 5-10 minutes of pumping to fill the rear tire.
Looks like the best bet is a combination of hand pump + CO2 cartridges.
Thanx Hyper!
Check out www.stopngo.com . They have several puncture repair kits for tubed and tubeless tires for use at home or on the road. The plug repair for tubeless tires is rather unique, in that it is a mushroom shaped rubber plug that is installed with a special insertion tool. The little tit of plug sticking out is then pulled back with a pair of pliers to seal the head against the inside of the tire, no glue needed.

They also have an air pump that works off of engine compression. I have only used one of these once, about 40 years ago on my uncles farm. Just took a spark plug out and screwed one end of the hose in there and the other end to the tire valve stem. Has an advantage over the CO2 cartridges in that you can use it as often as needed. Also you won`t have a heart attack from using a hand pump , eh old dog? I`ve carried a 12 volt compessor for years behind the seat of the truck for emergencies, and I have worn out the plastic gears on two of them. I like that they are quick and easy to use but don`t want to rely on only it, if I`m far from town.

Just onother option to consider. :rockon:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Sounds good hoss, i like the compression pump, sounds like it's got a one way valve in it, same as a compression tester.
Do i hold the spark plug wire with my teeth then??? :beerchug:
 

·
Old Twistie Sticks Rider
Joined
·
5,072 Posts
Check out www.stopngo.com
They also have an air pump that works off of engine compression. I have only used one of these once, about 40 years ago on my uncles farm. Just took a spark plug out and screwed one end of the hose in there and the other end to the tire valve stem. Has an advantage over the CO2 cartridges in that you can use it as often as needed. :rockon:
Hey OlHoss, I remember those darn things, haven't seen one in a bunch of years though...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
I was in the local Honda shop yesterday (there isn't a good Kawi shop located anywhere nearby) and noticed a compressor that's about the size of my splayed-out hand. It came with cables to alligator clip to your battery, cables that would permanently attach to your battery, and a cigarette lighter plug. I think that it had one more set of cables, but can't remember what they were for. Price on it was about $40. Came in its own hard case, too, to protect it as its bouncing around in your saddlebags. I told them that I may have to relieve them of one of those after I purchase my bags...

--FA
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,970 Posts
You have to take it to one of their faclities, which makes it a bit inconvenient every 10,000 miles.
No, you buy the tire from them, they do the treatment and send it to you.
They carry Metzler, Bridgestone, Dunlop, etc...you pay more for the tire because of the "treatment" but you do not have to have live near " one of their faclities"


RIF
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top