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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I'm a big fan of toggling my headlight when I approach intersections. Some people argue that drivers may read that as a "go ahead" signal saying that they can pull out in front of me.

I've been doing the normal toggling for a while now with very few problems. It breaks the monotony of daytime running lights, parking lights and other things cars often come standard with these days. Drivers seem to be trained to react to flashing and blinking lights from turn signals, ambulances, police cars, and construction vehicles etc..., so why not use that to our advantage.

I came up with a method that accomplishes two things: 1. It allows me to flash my headlight. and 2. It avoids the "go ahead" issue that comes with the usual lo-hi-lo method. Here it is... When approaching a "loaded" intersection i.e. one that has cars waiting to pull out, I do a "hi-2 lo-1" light toggle. Turn on your high beam for a two count and go back to lo for one count. It's not something like the usual flashing rhythm people are used to. Seems to be pretty affective in my experience, but I'm also a new rider.

What do you guys think?
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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Naturally, everyone you talk to will give you a different opinion on this.

I think you're on the right track, but if you really feel this is an effective strategy, go ahead and "bite the bullet" and get a headlamp modulator. They're a relatively simple install. These devices come with sensors that turn them off automatically at night, avoiding an obvious major problem.

I don't run mine all the time, but when traffic conditions start to get "busy" I do turn mine on.

Despite what others may have told you, they're legal in all 50 states--and also in Canada.

It's good motorcycle courtesy to turn the modulator off when stopped (at intersections, for example)--or anytime you're stuck immediately behind any vehicle(s). It's also generally good form not to use it when riding inside a good-sized group (i.e., 5 or more bikes).

Since you've described yourself as a "new rider"....also consider reading Proficient Motorcycling by David L Hough (if you haven't already). A fantastic and very interesting read for newer riders.
 

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Hey guys,

I'm a big fan of toggling my headlight when I approach intersections. Some people argue that drivers may read that as a "go ahead" signal saying that they can pull out in front of me.

I've been doing the normal toggling for a while now with very few problems. It breaks the monotony of daytime running lights, parking lights and other things cars often come standard with these days. Drivers seem to be trained to react to flashing and blinking lights from turn signals, ambulances, police cars, and construction vehicles etc..., so why not use that to our advantage.

I came up with a method that accomplishes two things: 1. It allows me to flash my headlight. and 2. It avoids the "go ahead" issue that comes with the usual lo-hi-lo method. Here it is... When approaching a "loaded" intersection i.e. one that has cars waiting to pull out, I do a "hi-2 lo-1" light toggle. Turn on your high beam for a two count and go back to lo for one count. It's not something like the usual flashing rhythm people are used to. Seems to be pretty affective in my experience, but I'm also a new rider.

What do you guys think?
Do this in New England where I am originally from and every car at the intersection will cut you off. In fact they ignore all two wheeled vehicle, regardless of lighting technique. Furthermore, flashing, blinking whatever in that region means 'I yield right of way to you, NOW MOVE-IT!'. However, in Portland, OR where I now live, there is no need to flash or blink. Portland auto drivers yield right of way to an two wheeled vehicle.

You might want to look into a headlight modulator device. Basically, it flashes the hi/lo beam constantly for better visibility while riding.
 

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Vintage bike addict
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Do that here you'll be run over. Flashing the headlight says you first!
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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In daylight hours I usually run with the hi beam light on full time. It might be a little annoying to drivers facing me, but it doesn`t blind anyone, as it would at night.

I like the idea of the headlight and brakelight modulators, but haven`t pried my wallet open for them yet.
 

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Super Moderator
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Leave the lights alone, and hit your HORN. This says, in just about every place I have been .."Look out and get the Hell out of my Way!!!!"

Nothing works better, other than pulling out an Uzi and and firing a full clip into the air as you approach the intersection.
Bullets being expensive, I prefer the Horn when I am in doubt of everyones intentions.

Flashing you high beam usualy means around here either that there is cop ahead . slow down........or , zero in on my light and hit me.

You might have them confused now, but at some point some dufus is going to cut you off , and say to you as the ambulance takes you away.."Sorry, but you signaled me to go ahead."

So, next time, try the horn. And I would suggest installing a LOUDER one if you can.


KM
 

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I do the High beam thing too.In one of my DOH! moments I asked MY CBR riding Friend why so many CBR's Had the left light out and he told me, 1 on low 2 on high and that he leaves his on high in the daytime because he wanted to be seen even if they didn't want to,I thought it was good point, so I do too now.Even if Ted did think I was a moron,I eventually catch on!!
 

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I have a modulator and their is al,ost no way anyone will take it for "go ahead"' The flash is to quick and repetative. That said I also have 130 DB horns to get their attention if they can't see the bike and flashing lights
 

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you better stay i your state if you get in the habit of flashing your hi beam at intersections. just this morning someone flicked the hi beams to me to let me go first. like KM said if its done on a strip it means cops or some sort of danger ahead like an accident or fallen tree.
 

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When I would ride my scooter 50cc here in vegas. I would do the flashing high beam thing especially for pulling out cars. Since a 50cc scooter has no power what so ever. I would flash when I see the cars pull out. Intersections are sort of the same.
Since I got my VN i haven't done that yet. But I think using highs during the day or a modulator is a good idea.

I heard somtimes switching to an HID system or a brighter bulb helps for visibility during the day
 

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So, next time, try the horn. And I would suggest installing a LOUDER one if you can.
KM
Other than not being a natural fan of using the horn I agree with everything you say. But thinking about it, especially the bit about being louder I ended up with.

Scene: A view over a junction of road and railway, with a freight train coming in from the top.

Sound of a freight train Horn

Train does a stoppie.

A bike comes in from the left

Viewpoint moves to brehind the bike with the the drivers cab in view.

Sound changes to emphasis the pipes

Rider gives a cheery wave and accelerates gently into the distance

fade to black

roll credits
 

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I recently installed both a headlight modulator and a brakelight modulator, and am finally beginning to notice they do help some. There are always going to be a few idiots out there that are bound and determined to run over you no matter what. I also use my horns, and the 4 way flashers, especially in slow stop and go traffic. I'm surprised more people don't do this.


I used to have a 50cc Honda Met, and as was said, it had no power at all. It would go 40 mph wide open, but had almost no acceleration from a stop, and cagers around here like to floor it as soon as the light changes. I rigged up the turn signals on that to work as 4 way flashers, and left them on all the time in town. I also bought a couple of solid white T shirts, and had an orange triangle sewn on the back of them. Here, that is a sign that means "slow moving vehicle". People sitting behind you at a red light see the flashing lights and the triangle, and they don't expect you to take off like a crotch rocket. It worked, most of the time.


I have also ridden in Portland a couple of time, I have relatives there, and have ridden up to visit them. It is definitely different than Phoenix. Here everything is laid out in a NSEW grid pattern. In Portland, the streets just go all over the place, and most of them are one way. Then there are the trains to deal with. I swear Portland must have more trains than any other city in the world. It's a whole different scene. Weather is really nice though. Jerry.
 

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Vintage bike addict
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I Don't use a modulator or flash my lights. I don't even know how my horn sounds as I never use that. My pipes are as quiet as I can make them. I ride like everyone is out to kill me. I plan for the most idiotic thing every driver I see can do. Almost always I need the plan. Stay safe out there.
 

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Sparky!!!
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I Don't use a modulator or flash my lights. I don't even know how my horn sounds as I never use that. My pipes are as quiet as I can make them. I ride like everyone is out to kill me. I plan for the most idiotic thing every driver I see can do. Almost always I need the plan. Stay safe out there.
I ride the same as you... every one on the roads is out to kill me, its my job to keep from being killed... I drive like this weather I am on my bike or in my cage.

Now back to the the headlight thingy... every where I have been flashing your headlight means one of 3 things, impeding danger, a speed trap, or at the intersection; go ahead. some states it is illegal to flash your high beams no matter the reason.
 

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I don't flash my high beam but I have put it on heading into an intersection to be more visible and then return to low beam after gettting through the intersection.
 

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Before getting the modulators, I always rode with my high beam on in the daytime. They teach than in the MSF classes, and I agree with it. Anything to increase your visibility. But, no matter how visible you try to be, it goes without saying that you always ride like you are invisible. Most cagers are not only stupid, but blind as well. Surprisingly, many bikers act the same way when driving a cage. Jerry.
 

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Flashing 'High' beams has always meant eff you as far as I'm concerned. Flashing ones headlights means I'm yielding yo you or danger ahead, (cop, downed tress etc.) Big difference between flashing headlights and flashing high beams. At least in the trucking world where most of my miles are from.
 
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