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Discussion Starter #1
I need tires for my 85 VN700.
Where is a decent place to buy new w/o having to spend $300.00 for a set?
Local Kaw dealer wants $240.00 for a rear alone!
Thanks for the help, I really appreciate it.:beerchug:
 

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Funny you should ask about this. I was just looking at tires for my ride today. My search was online and specifically for oversized tires, so your results may vary. Here's what I found: cheapcycleparts.com has a set of Pirelli MT66 Route for $171.10 plus shipping. This is a 110/90-19 front and a 170/80-15 rear. If you go with a stock size and a different brand, Dunlop for instance, your cost should be even less. Metzlers are high end and carry a heftier price tag.

Other sites had my tires for slightly more ($171.98) at motorcyclesuperstore.com and rockymountainatvmc.com.

There are quite a few posts in the archives here about tire choices, brands, sizes, etc. and lots of helpful folks on this forum I'm sure will chime in, too.

Good luck in your search.

John
 

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When I was looking for tires, jakewilson.com and rockymountainatvmc.com (believe it's the same parent company, different divisions) had the best prices for the Pirelli MT 66 tires I ordered. Have put 14,000 on them; rear has some tread left, and the front quite a bit.
 

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When I was looking for tires, jakewilson.com and rockymountainatvmc.com (believe it's the same parent company, different divisions) had the best prices for the Pirelli MT 66 tires I ordered. Have put 14,000 on them; rear has some tread left, and the front quite a bit.
Another vote for jakewilson.com and rockymountainatvmc.com (same company, warehouse, ordering, etc.). Great service and great price, when on sale. They also have coupons, like free shipping, that can be found on coupon sides like retailemenot.com. Also, get their metal 90 or 45 degree tire stem for the rear tire. It make checking the rear tire pressure a lot easier.
 

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Yes....I have also been doing some very intensive online tire shopping comparing tire prices and shipping charges. I have been shopping for either a set of (110/90/19 front) (170/80/15 rear) Shinko Tourmaster 230 price 127.00 a set or....... (100/90/19 front) (170/80/15 rear) Pirelli Night Dragon price 225.00 a set. I have to say Motorcycle Superstore and Jake Wilson / Rockymountainatvmc ....both have the best prices on the internet. There prices are truly "Rock Bottom". I am pretty sure all three of those stores offer free shipping on orders over 100.00........Also, I second the advice of the previous post....get the 90 degree valve stem for the rear tire.....it will save you alot of headaches!!!!! I hope this is helpful.:smiley_th Oh yes......For those of you that are unfamiliar with Shinko Tourmaster 230 tires......I found a picture online that proves that they are just renamed Yokohama Tour Star tires(same exact tread pattern) from before Yokohama sold there motorcycle tire division to Shinko Tires. Most Shinko motorcycle tires are just old Yokohama tire designs. I currently own a set of Shinko Tourmaster 230's and I have to say.....for the price....you can not get a better performing tire. For those looking for softer compound high performance cruiser tire....the Pirelli Night Dragon's are where it's at! This series is newer from Pirelli.......check them out! They seem to be a tire designed along the lines and offer the same performance of the Metzeler Marathon 880 and Avon Venom AM41/AM42, but they cost about 30.00 to 50.00 dollars less a set. They are marketed specifically as a tire designed for high torque V-Twins of today! That's right up our alley because the design of the Vulcan 750 was way before it's time anyway!
 

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just remember, tires are the ONLY thing between you and the pavement and you ONLY have two! so, how much is your life worth! buy the best you can get because when it comes to tires, you get what you pay for!

as for getting a 90 degree valve stem, you may want to get a 90 degree valve stem extension. I have read about many that had problems with 90 degree valve stem and the extensions worked better for most people. besides you can use the extensions on any bike.
 

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...as for getting a 90 degree valve stem, you may want to get a 90 degree valve stem extension. I have read about many that had problems with 90 degree valve stem and the extensions worked better for most people. besides you can use the extensions on any bike.
Odd, I have heard the exact opposite,that those with "extensions" had issues with them loosening up and/or leaking...while the bolt on aluminum angled valves worked flawlessly.

You really do not need "90 degreee" valve stems, the 45- 85 degree ones work well too.

However I do reccomend the machined aluminum ones and not the ones that just look like bent metal tubes. These cost more, but seem to worth it.

Can not find the link for the ones I posted before, but they look just like these:
http://www.motostrano.com/90devast.html

I do reccomend not using any kind of extension that screws on to the exsisting valve stem....unless you only use it fill the tires and not to ride with.


KM
 

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...as for getting a 90 degree valve stem, you may want to get a 90 degree valve stem extension. I have read about many that had problems with 90 degree valve stem and the extensions worked better for most people. besides you can use the extensions on any bike.

No problems with the 90 degree metal tire stems purchased from JakeWilson.com after almost a year of use. Only cost $2.00. Also, most tire stem extensions can not be left on the tire during operation, if the tire is equipped with standard rubber stems. The added off-centered mass and centrifugal force will stress standard rubber tire stems and cause them to fail. That means installing and uninstall the tire stem extension every time you need to check the tire pressure and add air.
 

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Thanks for the heads up and link Knifemaker.......Those are sweet! They are pricey......but the ease of checking your tire pressure and filling when needed will allow a person to want to check their tire pressure more often. A typical rider who also uses their bike to commute back and forth to work and pleasure riding will probably pay off those valve stems with having proper tire pressure in one riding season in just better gas mileage. It's truly amazing how much fuel you can save per fill-up by just checking your tire pressure on a weekly basis. Not to mention the safety hazard of having under inflated tires. They can heat up very quickly! Thanks again! :smiley_th
 

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I agree with Knifemaker on the these http://www.bikeeffects.com/proddetail.asp?prod=119701 type of 90 degree valve stems. yes, with that type you should not have any trouble. but those are not the ones I was talking about.

as for "extensions", people having issues with them loosening up and/or leaking. did these people leave them on the valve stem all the time and ride with them on? I only use my extensions to check the pressure and then put more air in the tire. then I take it off the valve stem and put it back in my tool bag.

I believe this to be true "most tire stem extensions can not be left on the tire during operation, if the tire is equipped with standard rubber stems. The added off-centered mass and centrifugal force will stress standard rubber tire stems and cause them to fail. That means installing and uninstall the tire stem extension every time you need to check the tire pressure and add air."
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I was able to find a place in Boise Idaho called Moto 1. They sell bike tires, and all they are is a warehouse, and they can order pretty much any type bike tire you want, and have them there in 2 or 3 days.
I don't know if they can ship them out to anyone, but he said shipping to them was free.
He suggested that I find the set I wanted, and he can get me a price.
He quoted me a price on a rear Metzler Me880 at $142.00 the 150/90-15 stock size.
I thought about going up a size wider, but I'm not sure if it will fit in the swingarm or not.
Thanks for the replies all, I really appreciate it a lot.
 

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I was able to find a place in Boise Idaho called Moto 1. They sell bike tires, and all they are is a warehouse, and they can order pretty much any type bike tire you want, and have them there in 2 or 3 days.
I don't know if they can ship them out to anyone, but he said shipping to them was free.
He suggested that I find the set I wanted, and he can get me a price.
He quoted me a price on a rear Metzler Me880 at $142.00 the 150/90-15 stock size.
I thought about going up a size wider, but I'm not sure if it will fit in the swingarm or not.
Thanks for the replies all, I really appreciate it a lot.
I belileve that to be a good price on that tire.

as for size, if you go up 1 size (I think it's 170/80-15), it will still fit. I did this on my VN750 and I love it!
 

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Don't forget to check the tire's manufacture date or 'birth date' before purchasing. Try to get the 'freshest' pair you can find, since cruiser tires are only good for about 5 years, regardless of use.
 

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wow, i didn't know they was such a wide variety of tires. My mechanic told me it was $180. for the front and 280. for the back. I am glad i didn't order them.
 

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no it was a extra 140.00 for them taking off old ones and installing new ones
 
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