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Discussion Starter #1
What’s up all, I’ve done a few searches through the site and haven’t found exactly the answer I’m looking for. My question is ,as the title suggests, about the fan and temp gauge, my fan works, I hear it when city riding and when parking. My temp gauge never moves though, I’ve read the trouble shooting tips for the temp sensor under the tank and will try those when time permits. But are these two electrically related? Does the fan get triggered by a different sensor? And the temp gauge is just related to engine temp? I haven’t spent a whole lot of time looking into this yet and trying to understand where all my possible causes are.
Thanks
 

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The fan switch on the left side of the radiator controls the fan.

There are some tests in the manual for the temp gauge. When you ground the temp sender wire, the needle should swing to the right. Do this only long enough to see if the needle moves. (probably need the key on)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The fan switch on the left side of the radiator controls the fan.

There are some tests in the manual for the temp gauge. When you ground the temp sender wire, the needle should swing to the right. Do this only long enough to see if the needle moves. (probably need the key on)
Ok good, This is similar to what I was reading earlier. If grounding it moves the needle the sender is the culprit correct? Essentially bypassing the sender??
 

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yes, that would work for testing the gauge itself.. remember, sensor on radiator is for turning on fan only, coolant temp sensor for gauge is on the thermostat housing
 

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Discussion Starter #6
yes, that would work for testing the gauge itself.. remember, sensor on radiator is for turning on fan only, coolant temp sensor for gauge is on the thermostat housing
Thanks that’s what I wasn’t clear about, at first I was thinking they’re we’re tied to the same sensor and my first thought was the gauge itself was bad. This is my next little project after I fix the door on my truck! Fun never ends
 

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I would only let the needle move about 3/4 of the way over. You don't want to burn it out. It is part of the cluster and cannot be replaced separately. If it starts to move over, then replace the sending unit. Of course there is always the possibility there is a bad connection somewhere between the sending unit and gauge. You might want to check that with an ohmmeter first.
 
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