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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Last weekend it rained in my neck of the woods so I used the time to do the ear shave and document it.

I can't qualify the difference except to say the bike starts easier and runs better. Seems to run with less effort (if that makes any sense). I would make the change again.

I hope you find the instructions useful. :smiley_th

<< EDIT: JANUARY 2016 >>
Sorry guys, but I deleted the google account associated with the blog thus the reason the link no longer works. Below, find the text version of the blog....I can't figure out how to upload the pics without doing them one at a time. The info below is over five years old so pricing and some sites may be obsolete. Procedure remains the same. ENJOY

Phil’s Ear Shave Procedure

Surprises: All 4 carb/cylinder rubber boot clamps were loose.
One surge tank/carb duct was split (see Figure 1)
Carbs are not separate…It is an assembly! (Guess I should have known, but I didn’t)
Not a surprise: Surge tank is difficult to get out.

Parts: (see Figure 2)
1 Mikuni Needle Shims Item# Price: 009-396 $6.95
2 Keihin 99101-393 Main Jet Size: 142 $13.90
2 n424-22 Pilot/Slow Jet sizes: 42 $13.90
Total $34.75
I purchased these from: Buy Keihin Jets @ PJMotorsports .com

2 Emgo Crank Case Filter $14.95 each
I purchased these from: Emgo Crank Case Filter Assembly - 14-20900 - Phat Performance Parts

2 Coasters $31 pair
I purchased these from: www.shermscycleproducts.com

Tools Used: (see Figure 3)
Phillips Screwdriver, Flat head screwdrivers, 10 mm open-end wrench (lock nuts), 7, 10, & 11mm sockets, sawsall (to cut surge tank). Cleaners.

• Took 6 hours….1 hour spent taking carb out (w/surge tank in!!). 1 hour removing surge tank!!
• A second person would have been a big help!!!!
• All terminology taken from the manual.

OK, Let’s get started:
1. Put the bike on the center stand
2. Remove seat (3 10mm bolts in tool box)
3. Close petcock shutoff valve. Disconnect vacuum line and fuel lines from petcock.
4. Disconnect fuel sensor connector
5. Remove gas tank. (3 11mm bolts)
Remove two screws (10 mm) securing air filters (see Figure 4)….remove filters w/oval air duct that attached to surge tank. (you should now be able to see through the surge tank)
6. Loosen carb surge tank duct clamp screws (see Figure 4). Pry surge tank ducts from surge tank and remove ducts.
7. Pry crank case breather (front of front cylinder) hose from front bottom of surge tank. Twist breather hose so end sticks out left side…..more about this in Step 35
8. Pry emissions hose from rear bottom of surge tank
9. Remove emissions hose from reed valves both sides…remove reed valves
10. Remove vacuum line from right side carb.
11. You should now have four hoses (3 large – 1 small) going to the separator…remove the separator and four hoses. (see Figure 5).
12. Install coasters (see Figure 6) ( I used Form-A-Gasket Sealant)
13. Plug the right side carburetor vacuum lead with a vacuum plug. (see Figure 7)
14. Loosen choke cable lock nut….turn adjuster “in” (toward handle grip) all the way
15. Remove choke cable sheath from bracket of front carb (see Figure 8)
16. Disconnect choke cable from linkage on rear carb

• I wanted to do this without removing the surge tank, but I was forced to remove it because I could not get the carb assembly back in with the surge tank in place. That said, you may want to remove the surge tank now to aid in the removal of the carb assembly. Using a saws-all, I chose to make a single cut as shown in Figure 9 Obviously caution needs to be considered to avoid electrical wiring & coolant hoses.
The larger piece simply pulls out from the rear….the smaller piece out the right side of frame.

NOTE:
The front cylinder carb/cylinder rubber boot will REMAIN ATTACHED the cylinder head during removal of carb assembly

• Loosen the carb-side screw ONLY of the front cylinder carb/cylinder rubber boot. This rubber boot will REMAIN on cylinder! (see Figure 10)
• Loosen the cylinder-side screw ONLY of the rear cylinder carb/cylinder rubber boot. This rubber boot will REMAIN on carb!

17. With the surge tank out and the clamps above loosened, you can now remove the carb assembly. BTW: it is a carburetor ASSEMBLY (both carbs are attached to each other and come out together). Use a twisting action to remove the carbs making sure (as noted before) the rubber boot of front cylinder stays on cylinder and rubber boot of rear cylinder stay with carb.
18. Loosen both throttle lock nuts….turn adjuster “in” (toward handle grip) all the way
19. Loosen throttle cable lock nuts on carb brackets and disconnect both from throttle linkage. Note which cable goes to linkage!! (see Figure 11)

You now have the carb assembly free from the bike

20. The Main & Slow jets are under the bottom cover (see Figure 12) The jet needle in under the top cover (see Figure 14)
21. Remove top cover carefully and gently peel diaphragm from cover. Do not pull the diaphragm & vacuum piston from carb. You will see a spring and plastic bracket covering the jet needle. Set them aside and remove jet needle. Install two shims as shown in Figure 15. Reassemble & install top cover!
22. Repeat step 21 on other carb.
23. Remove bottom cover. Remove and replace main jet (see Figure 13). Remove and replace slow jet (see Figure 13). Reinstall bottom cover.
24. Repeat step 23 on other carb.
25. Take time now to seat (screw in) air mixture screws and back out 2 ½ turns. (see Figure 16).
26. Take time to clean carb assembly
27. Take time to clean the area around the cylinder intakes

It’s time to re-install the carb assembly!

28. Attach throttle cables to throttle wheel linkage…..don’t tighten yet
29. Carefully re-install carb assembly. I found it easier to get the front cylinder connected first, then connected rear….double check to ensure boots are properly installed/aligned.
30. Tighten boot clamp screws
31. Tighten throttle cables to carb brackets. Adjust throttle cables, test throttle operation and tighten lock nuts.
32. Attach choke cable and ensure cable sheath is in the bracket of front carb
33. Adjust & test choke operation…then tighten lock nut
34. Install K&N air filters (see Figure 7)
35. Use your own discretion for connecting crankcase breather hose and carb vents to Emgo filters. See Figure 17 for how I did it with the crankcase breather hose.
36. Install fuel tank…connect carb fuel & vacuum hoses…connect sensor connector
37. Open petcock.
38. Took a few cranks before she came to life…..but when she did, Sweet!!! 

Left exhaust (rear cylinder) had slight popping on decel. I backed out mixture screw another ¼ turn on right (rear) carb.

Hope this was helpful!!!






Some nice-to-know stuff:..
Carb has:
Main jet….Shown in Figures 2 & 13
Slow/Pilot jet…. Shown in Figures 2 & 13
Needle jet…. Shown in Figure 13 (the main jet is IN the needle jet)
Jet needle…. Shown in Figure 15
 

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Very well done!
 

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Well done, great pics - thanks!

Wish Sherms would make their coasters about a 3/16"-1/4" wider though to cover the entire valve mounting area. Put my coasters on last night and was a little disappointed with that part.
 

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Big Dumb Viking
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Do you still have this in .pdf format? I'd like to download it and save for the future. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wish Sherms would make their coasters about a 3/16"-1/4" wider though to cover the entire valve mounting area. Put my coasters on last night and was a little disappointed with that part.
Agreed. I was disappointed too.....slightly larger would look better.
 

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I agree, well done!

One item Ron suggested to me when I did mine was to get a longer bolt for the rear of the tank and a spacer that is about 1/2" or a little less. It made getting the left K&N filter on easier with less contact with the tank seam. You don't notice the lift at all with the seat on.

I obviously need a little more tweaking as my mileage is rather poor (40 mph or so). Very happy with the mod and the look though.
 

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I agree, well done!

One item Ron suggested to me when I did mine was to get a longer bolt for the rear of the tank and a spacer that is about 1/2" or a little less. It made getting the left K&N filter on easier with less contact with the tank seam. You don't notice the lift at all with the seat on.

I obviously need a little more tweaking as my mileage is rather poor (40 mph or so). Very happy with the mod and the look though.
Thanks for the tip Unk.
Are you saying you are getting 40mpg mileage after the mod?
My bike was only getting 32-33mpg when it was running before. What is the typical average our bike "should" be getting.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the tip Unk.
My bike was only getting 32-33mpg when it was running before. What is the typical average our bike "should" be getting.
Whoa... a stock bike should get about 48-50 MPG!! Mods, larger tires, etc. will lower it.
 

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Thanks for the tip Unk.
Are you saying you are getting 40mpg mileage after the mod?
My bike was only getting 32-33mpg when it was running before. What is the typical average our bike "should" be getting.
Whoa... a stock bike should get about 48-50 MPG!! Mods, larger tires, etc. will lower it.
IMO 48-50 mpg is reasonable to expect on a stock vn750, on the highway, at a steady 60 mph.
Pushing speeds up will decrease fuel economy.
The larger jets installed with an ear shave will give more power, but burn more fuel. You can`t get something for nothing.

Changing out the 100/90 front tire for the larger diameter 110/90 causes the odometer to read lower and the mpg calculation to to give a lower reading, even if the actual fuel economy has not changed.

32-33 mpg seems very low fuel economy, unless you are a very agressive throttler.:pepper::motorcycl
 

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I do have the 110/90 front tire, and I used to drive to work on the highway at 70-75mph. I weigh 230.
So putting all that together does the 32-33mpg sound more normal, or is something else going on that I need to look into?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I do have the 110/90 front tire, and I used to drive to work on the highway at 70-75mph. I weigh 230.
So putting all that together does the 32-33mpg sound more normal, or is something else going on that I need to look into?
Still sound low to me. Can't imagine these bikes getting less the 40 MPG.
Maybe others can chime in.
 

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My 40mpg was after the ear shave but I know there are other minor issues at play. I'm sure I need to rebuild the petcock and have a kit on the way. If the bike is on the side stand i have a very very minor gas leak and have yet to investigate the source. Could be as minor as a hose not fully seated or the petcock diaphragm. I couldn't believe how much rust I got out of the tank when I first got the bike but I know the tank itself is not leaking. I never disassembled the petcock so other than hose seating that's my first go to. It's such a simple thing that it makes sense to do it anyway. Some other minor dialing in is in order as well. I know you sacrifice some mileage with the mod but still feel 40mph is on the low side. Not complaining, still having a blast with it.

When I spoke with Ron back during the mod he told me to only go 1-3/4 turns on the screws so I may need to dabble with that too. I see 2-1/2 turns used with the same jets. I have also need to synch the carbs and have been putting that off until I can borrow the gear from a buddy. It's all fun though.
 

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Big Dumb Viking
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I wish I got 40mpg. I am lucky to get 30. I am 320 pounds. Bike runs great. So, I dunno what's sucking down the mileage. Standard sized tires.
 

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I get between 40 and 50 mpg. Once got 60, not sure how that happened though. Oversized tires, no earshave and screws turned to 2.5 turns. 185 lbs
 

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