Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I dropped my 05 Vulcan last week the only damage was that the ignition switch is loose where do I tighten it up at

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I897 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
I dropped my 05 Vulcan last week the only damage was that the ignition switch is loose where do I tighten it up at

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I897 using Motorcycle.com Free App
you might have a broken bolt. they are hard to get to without removing the headlight bucket, but it can be done. look up from the bottom of the triple clamp, there are two medium sized allen head bolts, should be zinc plated and kinda gold in color. you can actually remove or install the bolts (unless broken) with a loose allen wrench, a folding set or socket tip ain't gonna fit, it's pretty hard to see them up in there. good luck.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
Wow. Of all the parts I would think of that might get damaged somehow when the bike gets dropped, the ignition switch would likely not even make the list.

You got like 4 lbs of keys on your key ring or something??? ;)

LOL

KM
LOL I thought the same thing.
 

·
Total Newbie
Joined
·
53 Posts
My wife dropped my bike...

Oops! In case she reads this...

My wife dropped OUR bike and bent the clutch handle. No other damage and no real need to fix it other than cosmetic. How lucky am I... I mean... How luck are WE that's all that happened.

She did also hurt her confidence, and that sort of sucks, but we'll get her back on soon. She rides passenger, but she really wants to drive one. She took the MSF class and everything. She's just so darn nervous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
Thats a shame that your wife had a mishap with the bike, don't pressure her into getting back on let her build up to it again, maybe let her get a little practice on something a little smaller and build up to the 750,:smiley_th
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Hurt confidence is a lot better than hurting something else. Hey, now you two know that the bike can drop and it's not the end of the world and she can build back up to trying it again.

I had the same thing happen with my wife and my bike. Sounds like yours fared a little better than mine did...I had a broken clutch lever and left front foot rest. I think the vn750 is a little top heavy and too tall for many women. My wife is only 5' 2" and even though she is athletic and strong, she still had trouble with the bike.

My wife is starting to talk about wanting to try to ride a smaller bike again. So just give her time and she will come around again. :smiley_th
 

·
Total Newbie
Joined
·
53 Posts
Swagman: No worries. I don't pressure. I want her to ride with me more often, but if she doesn't ride on her own, that's fine. And you're exactly right; she's been talking about a Honda Rebel or a scooter - something smaller and lighter.

Deviate: She actually did also get a little bruised and inflamed, but she was wearing jeans so no scrapping or blood. She might have also had a little whiplash. Nothing that makes her leery of trying again.

I don't know what I would have done if the clutch completely broke. I don't know how to fix these things and shops charge way too much. You're right on; I am lucky.

The question I wonder about is, is the bike too heavy, top-heavy, too tall, etc. or is it the lack of experience, confidence, etc.? The bottom line is, if the bike is completely straight up, it takes no strength to hold it there. If it slightly tips, you ought to feel it before it tips so much that gravity gets a hold of it. Besides, my wife weight trains. I don't know if it was a strength thing or a fear thing. In either case, starting smaller will help her overcome.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,354 Posts
Tell her not to feel bad at all...I been riding bikes since the late 60s, and I dropped mine recently....standing still...thought the sidestand was down (really)...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I was doing figure 8's in an empty parking lot the other day, right after i got the bike, and when I was trying to figure out how tight the turning radius is, and... well, I found out. Sort of. On my leg. slowing to a stop... no damage, except to my pride.
 

·
Chasin' the blacktop
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
did my bike drop at .01 mph doing a u-turn on gravel. knee dent in the tank but a great reminder that it only takes an instant to mess up a nice factory paint job. : )
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
Hurt confidence is a lot better than hurting something else. Hey, now you two know that the bike can drop and it's not the end of the world and she can build back up to trying it again.

I had the same thing happen with my wife and my bike. Sounds like yours fared a little better than mine did...I had a broken clutch lever and left front foot rest. I think the vn750 is a little top heavy and too tall for many women. My wife is only 5' 2" and even though she is athletic and strong, she still had trouble with the bike.

My wife is starting to talk about wanting to try to ride a smaller bike again. So just give her time and she will come around again. :smiley_th
Swagman: No worries. I don't pressure. I want her to ride with me more often, but if she doesn't ride on her own, that's fine. And you're exactly right; she's been talking about a Honda Rebel or a scooter - something smaller and lighter.

Deviate: She actually did also get a little bruised and inflamed, but she was wearing jeans so no scrapping or blood. She might have also had a little whiplash. Nothing that makes her leery of trying again.

I don't know what I would have done if the clutch completely broke. I don't know how to fix these things and shops charge way too much. You're right on; I am lucky.

The question I wonder about is, is the bike too heavy, top-heavy, too tall, etc. or is it the lack of experience, confidence, etc.? The bottom line is, if the bike is completely straight up, it takes no strength to hold it there. If it slightly tips, you ought to feel it before it tips so much that gravity gets a hold of it. Besides, my wife weight trains. I don't know if it was a strength thing or a fear thing. In either case, starting smaller will help her overcome.
About 5 years ago, when I was still looking for my first motorcycle, I saw someone practicing slow riding in the church parking lot when I pulled in one afternoon. I turned away from the rider and parked about 100 feet away. I heard a female voice calling for help when I opened my car door. She had stalled with the bars hard over to the left and the bike leaning and pulling her slowly over too. I ran over and grabbed the handlebars and twisted them straight as I lifted/pushed the bike back up to a vertical position.

The gal riding was in her mid twenties, a soldier who works out and more fit and stronger than most women I would say. BUT she was only 5' 2" tall and riding a brand new Suzuki 800 cruiser that she had just bought that day. She said she had already dropped the bike once to the other side before I got there and broke the front signal light. Her only previous riding experience was on much smaller bikes at the rider training course.

I think her biggest problem was the seat was too wide for her and she could not readily reach the ground until the bike was leaned over too far when she stopped or stalled or what ever happened.

Here are are a couple of places where they can reshape the seat and narrow the front of it to make it fit the inseam challenged. :)

Spencers:
http://greatdaytoride.com/Home_Page.php

Butt Buffer:
http://www.buttbuffer.com/p5/Seat-Installations/pages.html

A narrower seat, and/or a smaller scoot to learn on may help smaller riders, or those with less upper body strength too.
A lower center of gravity is what we are looking for I guess.

Deb, a new female rider in her fifties comes out to the local bike night.
She rode a Honda Shadow 750 for 2 seasons but traded up to a H-D Road King last summer. Deb has a slim build and seems quite fit.
She says the 700 pound Harley handles easier at low speeds than the 500 pound Shadow did.
Not sure if it is all due to a lower C-O-G, or if a different rake/trail steering geometery may come into play here too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,867 Posts
Old thread returns...;)

I don think its about strength or how "top heavy" a bike is, it's weight verses leverage. Both the Vulcan and my FJR (120 pounds heavier) went down in my driveway simply because the bike got leaned past a critical point at near zero velocity.

Not many folks can hold 500 or 600 pounds up with just one leg. Once the bike leans over to a certain point....it's going down, all you can do is either try and slow down the fall or get the heck out of the way.

My lesson here was just not to try the crazy U turn up a hill manuver anymore and all was fine.

I know man new riders are freaked out about dropping their bike...just seems to me they should just go out and push the thing over and get it over with .....;) LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
When I was a teenager a friend of mine's dad would buy a new vehicle and as soon as he got it home he would take a ball peen hammer and put a dent just behind the front bumper. That way it was already dinged and he wouldn't worry about it anymore. :doh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Wife let hers down slowly in the drive way to, doing a three point turn in a bumpy section of driveway, bent front brake lever. Just put lower 11" shocks on and she sat on it and was extremely impressed. She said she feels way more confident with it than ever before.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top