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Dear MOby,

I just saw your answer regards oil change. My manual says that I need to change oil every 3000 miles. But I only ride about 1000 miles per year (very short commute). By the book, I need to perform oil change every three years. Do I really need to change oil every year? Is it okay to change oil every three years, just because I don’t ride that much?

Thank you
Jay

PS: Just to make myself comfortable, I do oil change once a year.
Read more about Do I Really Have To Change My Oil Every Year? at Motorcycle.com.
 

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Yes,I agree,it's worth it for what it costs to change it every year,and also adds to peace of mind when you open it up ,which I like to do when I hit the highway....hah!!!
 

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It isn't necessary. Oil doesn't go bad or "acidic" from sitting, even in an engine. There are so many myths and misconceptions with vehicles, it's tough to sort through it all sometimes.

Also, 3,000 or even 5,000 mile changes are more frequent than necessary with modern oils, especially on a water cooled vehicle. 5-8k changes are cheap insurance though.

Without getting into the chemistry of it, the main thing is how much crap it's picked up from the engine and whether the lubricating molecules have broken down from lots of mileage and high heat.
 

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I agree with Hex, but I would ask where you live. If up north, does the bike sit all winter in below freezing temps? You can get condensation in your oil, and it can change its chemistry if subjected to below freezing weather.
I had one that I rode in the winter and the oil looked like spoiled mayonnaise...
 

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2014 KLR 650!
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If you are assuming the environment is climate controlled perhaps but you are watering (oxidizing) the **** out of oil in a metal engine that has rising and falling temps. You can not spend the $40 bucks once a year if you like. I change that **** every 3000 miles even with full synthetic. With my sporty I can tell the difference and it's not in my head as the primary drive is wet. These vulcans have twice the RPM as my sporty (half the raw ass power Doc) so I would be an oil changing fool if I were you.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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especially considering how smooth and vibration free my vn750 is with good balancer bushings,I wouldn't know how much raw ass power it has,cause it never vibrates my ass raw.😉

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Alpha Geek
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If you are assuming the environment is climate controlled perhaps but you are watering (oxidizing) the **** out of oil in a metal engine that has rising and falling temps. You can not spend the $40 bucks once a year if you like. I change that **** every 3000 miles even with full synthetic. With my sporty I can tell the difference and it's not in my head as the primary drive is wet. These vulcans have twice the RPM as my sporty (half the raw ass power Doc) so I would be an oil changing fool if I were you.
The only way any appreciable amount of condensation would collect is if the bike never gets up to normal operating temps. It really should not be an issue. In that case, I'd check the t-stat. They're designed to fail open rather than failing closed and overheating.

Also, in my experience, water in sporty primaries is usually from rain or wash water getting in through one of a few places.
 

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especially considering how smooth and vibration free my vn750 is with good balancer bushings,I wouldn't know how much raw ass power it has,cause it never vibrates my ass raw.😉

Sent from my LGL34C using Tapatalk
You put them in? cool!
 

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The only way any appreciable amount of condensation would collect is if the bike never gets up to normal operating temps. It really should not be an issue. In that case, I'd check the t-stat. They're designed to fail open rather than failing closed and overheating.

Also, in my experience, water in sporty primaries is usually from rain or wash water getting in through one of a few places.
Since when? The first sign you'll see is overheating, because when they stick open, it's not so noticeable. Might see a lower engine temp, or the heater not so good in a car. Most I've changed have stuck closed, and it was known right away. Motorad Failsafe t-stats are designed to fail open, I know of no others at the moment.

Short trips on any engine will make the oil or at least the valve cover milky. Let it go long enough and the oil turns to paste. Somebody that only drives a short distance to work and home will certainly see a problem.

With the temp swings in my garage the past three months, all metal looks like it was misted with a spray bottle. Has to happen in the crankcase too.

To say that oil does not go acidic, flies in the face of decades of motoring data that says otherwise.

At 3000-3500 miles, my oil sure looks and smells like it needed changed. The VN manual says a lot more miles, but that really looks like a misprint.
 

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Oh, you're gonna do this again, huh? Just like the "ethanol is teh ebil" thread? I should know better than to bite on your obvious troll bait, but I hate seeing others misinformed by people who have just enough knowledge to be dangerous.

For those not aware, I have a great deal of mechanical experience, definitely more than this guy who seems to enjoy trolling every technical he sees me post, and I also have not only certified master mechanics and mechanical engineers in the family but people teaching such things at a college level to those becoming certified in these fields. I also don't vomit out a line of crap, pseudoscience, and myths because I only speak about what I KNOW that I know about unless I've specified otherwise.

Since when? ...Most I've changed...I know of no others
Yes, they are absolutely designed that way. Doesn't mean it always works. Yeah, most that people change have stuck partially or fully closed because that's when people NOTICE. It is known by every competent mechanic and automotive engineer that this is a FACT.

the oil turns to paste.
Show me an engine being drained of this "paste" aside from a few traces like clouding on sight glasses. It's a non-issue for a vehicle that gets up to operating temp even occasionally.

Has to happen in the crankcase too.
LOL. :laugh: Not to any appreciable degree from just sitting, and if the engine gets decently hot at all, it will drive the moisture out, otherwise we'd have a lot of cars with iron blocks and heads just rusting holes right in them.

To say that oil does not go acidic, flies in the face of decades of motoring data that says otherwise.
You're being nonspecific to be misleading. The reserve alkalinity depletes and you get viscosity "breakdown", yes, but that's from heat and mechanical degredation, NOT from sitting. If you knew the first thing about organic chemistry, you'd understand the underlying principles. You don't, and you don't, and I have a damn degree in it. Seriously, you don't know who you're arguing with all the time. :BLAM:

Letting it sit does essentially zero to both alkalinity and condensation. Think about the source of the article and how oil companies and Jiffy Lubes have been saying for decades and are still telling us to change every 3000 miles. It's a load of crap.

I know better than to reply to your trollish goading again, so don't expect a response. :beerchug:
 

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I know I'm talking to a youngster that thinks he learned everything from a book, versus decades of real experience and compiled data combined.

Wasn't troll bait, just batting down some of those motoring myths. Ya know?

Not sure what your problem is with me, don't much care, but I bet my first guess is right. When you spout nonsense, I'm likely to dispute it. But no, I won't follow the garbage responses line by line. Not sure exactly what words have triggered your tirade of sarcasm and name calling, I guess anyone that disagrees with you can be a target.

If all thermostats have been designed to fail open, Motorad would never have received the patent for theirs.

I've got 30 year old quarts of oil in the garage. Open one up and pour it out, guess what, the bottom 1/10 or so is like mayonnaise from condensation in the bottle. It's been known for decades that condensation contaminates the oil, it's indisputable. Get out and work on some engines Mr. Engineer.

There's a reason engineers are the running joke in industry.

Ethanol sucks son, go back and look in your carbs again. ha! Yep, you have just enough 'knowledge' to be dangerous. As I said in your favorite thread, you are too young to have ever seen or used real gasoline. Deal with it.

PS - Capitalizing the word FACT, does not make it one.
 

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MotoRad | Products| Fail-Safe

Fail-Safe Thermostats offer premium, patented technology for superior protection over any thermostat on the market. Only Fail-Safe is designed to lock in the open position when overheating occurs due to a failing cooling system component. This allows maximum coolant flow, thus preventing expensive engine damage.

Exclusive, patented design

Locking technology prevents costly engine damage
100% tested and calibrated
Manufactured with the highest quality materials from an OE supplier

Fail-Safe is designed to help protect your engine when overheating occurs. When overheating occurs, Fail-Safe automatically locks in the open position to permit maximum coolant flow.

When standard thermostats fail, they lock in the closed position and prevent coolant flow to the engine, which can possibly cause serious damage to your engine. Fail-Safe has a patented safeguard against overheating damage.

Fail-Safe thermostats are designed with a unique extra stroke that allows operation in two stages:

Stage 1: Within normal operating temperatures, the Fail-Safe operates the same as any other thermostat.

Stage 2: When overheating is caused by a deteriorating cooling system part, the Fail-Safe has a secondary stroke that activates a precision engineered piston that automatically locks the valve into a wide open position allowing coolant to circulate freely.

Note: Once the Fail-Safe thermostat has locked in the open position, it must be replaced and cannot be used again.
___________________

Don't confuse "failed" with "stuck open".
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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The only way any appreciable amount of condensation would collect is if the bike never gets up to normal operating temps. It really should not be an issue. In that case, I'd check the t-stat. They're designed to fail open rather than failing closed and overheating.

Also, in my experience, water in sporty primaries is usually from rain or wash water getting in through one of a few places.
if oil comes out of a Harley water can find its way in

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