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Premium Member
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1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any chance of us coming up with diesel/biodiesel applications? Just wondering if it is possible with our type of engines. I know little about 2strokes 4strokes etc...any comments?:carryflag
 

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Premium Member
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267 Posts
It would not seem likely, the compressive force required to ignite the diesel would blow our aluminum engines up. Cast iron in generous proportions is desired, and the starter would have to be pretty beefy too.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #3
wow.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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MANIC MECHANIC
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943 Posts
Diesel can be done in aluminum but it requires steel cylinder sleeves and steel heads plus the slow torquey power of diesel wouldn't feel right on the bike.
 

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335 Posts

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carbon unit
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369 Posts
plus the slow torquey power of diesel wouldn't feel right on the bike.
uhm...you're thinking like a diesel tractor or truck. Very heavy and geared to bring the torque value of the engine in gradually.
Diesel powered vehicles can be really quick off the line.
I can leave em setting at the light with my van most every time if i want.
I would want the bike to be turbo charged tho.

Check out this project.
 

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carbon unit
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369 Posts
And checkout this video of our diesel powered motorhome.
but keep in mind that these travcos are heavy with all steel framed walls.
 

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1985 VN-700
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418 Posts
Would be kinda stinky on a motorcycle wouldnt it though. Or you could have stacks similiar to the easy rider bike!
 

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carbon unit
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369 Posts
Today's diesel injector technology causes the fuel to burn more completely.
Plus with the low sulfur fuel the smell isn't like it used to be.
Now running B20 and B99 smells like your driving a fast food restaurant
down the road. LOL

 

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I remember GM trying to convert gasoline engines to diesel in the late 70's. It was a complete disaster and resulted in several class action lawsuits. Diesel engines are designed to run on diesel, gas on gasoline. I think that a conversion from one to the other is novel, but misses the finer engineering needed to make it truly efficient.
 

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carbon unit
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369 Posts
I remember GM trying to convert gasoline engines to diesel in the late 70's. It was a complete disaster and resulted in several class action lawsuits. Diesel engines are designed to run on diesel, gas on gasoline. I think that a conversion from one to the other is novel, but misses the finer engineering needed to make it truly efficient.
Silly me, I did go off topic on a tangent after Joe's post


so yes, I agree converting a gasoline engine to a diesel is a really bad idea.
 

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I remember GM trying to convert gasoline engines to diesel in the late 70's. It was a complete disaster and resulted in several class action lawsuits. Diesel engines are designed to run on diesel, gas on gasoline. I think that a conversion from one to the other is novel, but misses the finer engineering needed to make it truly efficient.
That was one of the first ever diesel applications in a car, and yes there were a lot of problems in the begining. The biggest was the consumers and hometown mechanics knowledge of the new product. they look simmiar to an SBC but by no means is it a converted gas engine. What killed that engine was end of the fuel crisis so oldsmobile gave up. there are some of those engines that still run on the road today, just very rare. Re-use of torque to yeild bolts, adding gas only fuel stabilizers and the absence of a water seperator killed the above engine.
 

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1985 VN-700
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418 Posts
Those GM engines couldnt keep head gaskets in place. I know someone who had a forever warranty on his pickup truck.
 

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MANIC MECHANIC
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I had an '81 Toronado diesel It ran great but no it could not keep head gaskets as soon as the car overheated they were gone I thought I had solved this by having a custom radiator built by GDI in knoxville It was a 4 core aluminum with external oil and trans coolers. 2 Days before I got the radiator a heater hose blew it over heated and that was it. I traded the block for my first bike, and the rest is history.
 

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carbon unit
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369 Posts
That was one of the first ever diesel applications in a car, and yes there were a lot of problems in the begining. The biggest was the consumers and hometown mechanics knowledge of the new product. they look simmiar to an SBC but by no means is it a converted gas engine. What killed that engine was end of the fuel crisis so oldsmobile gave up. there are some of those engines that still run on the road today, just very rare. Re-use of torque to yeild bolts, adding gas only fuel stabilizers and the absence of a water seperator killed the above engine.
Don't be such a wankel ;)

It may have been the first diesel powered GM car. However it wasn't even close to being one of the first passenger cars produced with a diesel engine.

click here to see an earlier example

And another opinion on this subject:

The primary problem with GM's diesel engines of the 1970s was their design — although the engines used a unique block, the design was based on Oldsmobile's 350 V8. The design had a weakness in the head design and head bolts, which were not able to withstand the higher cylinder pressures and temperatures of diesel use. This design weakness combined with poor diesel fuel quality in the 80's led to catastrophic failure of pistons, cylinder heads, and even cylinder walls. Reinforced truck diesel engines, from GM and other companies, did not have these problems. Today, GM uses diesel engines from DMAX (for trucks) and Isuzu (for non-US cars) but does not offer a diesel engine in any of their North American passenger cars.
 
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