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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought an 06 750 Vulcan. Ive been reading about the grease (or lack of ) on the shaft splines. I also have been reading that this is happening on all models including the 06's. Im thinking that the dealer should be responsible for checking the splines for gease and not me.
Does anyone agree with me? Why the hell should I have to pay or even do the work myself when this machine is brand new. Ive called the dealer about this and was told that the service manager will get back to me. If this is the fault of the factory, wouldnt you think that Kawasaki should take care of the costs to check for grease?.
Just sitting here thinking that I just spent 6k on the bike that might have a problem from the factory and kawasaki should foot the bill for the labor involved in checking for grease.
Your thoughts and comments welcome.
 

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I would think so if it's new thay should take care of it......
I wounder why thay arn't greased at the factory
why would thay miss all of them, I could see maybe
a few but most of them....
 

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I would think that the only way it could be missed on so many bikes is that it is left off of the assembly procedures. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Those are my thoughts also, but the question is will the dealer do the labor for something that might not be the case, as in there might or might not be grease on the splines. If there were some sort of notification from the factory then it would be a non issue of who is responsible for labor costs.
 

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If even ONE bike comes out of the factor with no grease, that's one too many. It's bizarre! Kawasaki has been around long enough to know how to assemble bikes. I can't help but think there is some other explanation besides "we forgot to put the grease on." DUH!
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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It's the same with just about any OEM bearings you buy for the bike. Very little if any grease in them, from the factory.
Some aftermarket ones have enough that you can atleast see it in there.

Guess it's just part of Kawasaki's ....

:motorcycl "Forcefully Induced Owners Maintenance Program":motorcycl​
 

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>>>>> am going to discuss with dealer<<<<<

Dachwuff: Please report what you learn from your dealer. Thanks. Dan.
 

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I was under the impression that Kawasaki doesn't grease them, period.

It's a "mod" users do in the hopes of increasing shaft life. (And, yes, I did mine soon after I bought it!)
 

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No it is not a "Mod" that users do to increase shaft life. If it was, why on earth would it be included as part of regular scheduled maintenance and the specific type of grease specified?
The bikes are crated and sent to the dealer. The dealer does the dealer prep and finishes assembling the bike. Now it does arrive there with the rear wheel attached and the dealer could assume the splines have been greased. As a dealer, that is aware of some of the problems, you'd think they would take that oppurtunity to check just to be sure, but I don't think it is part of the regular assembly process. After all, it could be additional warranty work income for them if they do fail within the year. They get paid by Kawasaki for warranty work.

There have been reports of people asking that it be checked at the 600 mile warranty check and the dealer not doing it. Saying they did when they didn't does make it the dealer's responsibilty then. (Some check the gear oil, and not the splines).

The problem has gotten better with the later 2005 and 2006 models so obviously Kawasaki did take note.
 

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Dont bother talking to the dealer....I already have. They told me "there is no such issue, and that online boards like this are full of 'mechanical engineers' that are out to start causing hype. This bike is bullet proof, and has been around so long that any issues would have been addressed by now."

As the mechaninc told me that i was thinking to myself, they said the Titanic was unsinkable, and before she could even finish her first trip, she sank.....

Just do it yourself, that way you know its done, and done right. Took me about 2 hrs and 3 beers....
 

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It isn't a crazy hard job to do, but it does take a couple of hours. I'd go ahead and do it, unless the shop is going to let you watch them check it. If you look at the photos in my procedure below, you can see how badly mine were worn on a 2002 with 12k miles. I wish I had taken photos of them when I first pulled it apart, all brown and rusty, full of rust powder. I cleaned and packed them with moly and put back together until I could find replacement parts. They weren't going to last much longer, as you can see. Once you see photos like mine, you'll worry until you check them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, I got a call from my dealer this morning concerning my orginal post. The dealer told me that he contacted Kawasaki about the grease/spline issue that I brought to his attention. He informed me that Kawasaki had told him that Kawa has no issues with the VN 750. So in essence, the dealer will not check the splines for grease. The dealer also gave me a line that It would take him over a half a day to tear down and assemble the final drive for inspection. I know he was blowing smoke up my butt. In any case, Its up to every owner of a VN750 to have his or her splines checked for grease. As a side note, with the dealer giving me a line of crap on how long it would take them to do a tear down and assemble, I will not be going back to them for any warrantee work. I just dont trust them.
 

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The dealership in Conroe that I asked to check mine when I first bought it, that didn't know what I was talking about and basically changed my gear oil instead, actually sent me a positive response via email when I sent them the link to the procedure on lubing the splines. Sadly enough, the took the mufflers off both sides of the bike just to change the rear tire. I'm sure that added 30 minutes to the labor cost, and they were probably going by the book.
Anyway, they said that they'd use the material I sent them to better service their customers in the future, or something to that effect.
 

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fergy said:
The dealership in Conroe that I asked to check mine when I first bought it, that didn't know what I was talking about and basically changed my gear oil instead, actually sent me a positive response via email when I sent them the link to the procedure on lubing the splines. Sadly enough, the took the mufflers off both sides of the bike just to change the rear tire. I'm sure that added 30 minutes to the labor cost, and they were probably going by the book.
Anyway, they said that they'd use the material I sent them to better service their customers in the future, or something to that effect.
Why take the mufflers off
just pull the raer shock's and let the rear
drop down axle come's right out......
 

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Search Goddess
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Propeller shaft joint – lubricate First at 6,000km/4,000 miles and every 36,000km/24,000 miles as per the
Kawasaki Service Manual
1-8 General Information
Periodic Maintenance Chart
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
What they are talking about when saying "propeller shaft joint" is the universal joint. Not the splines.
 

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Rubline said:
What they are talking about when saying "propeller shaft joint" is the universal joint. Not the splines.
Usually I would beg to differ, but on this I will totally disagree!

I am referring to the Kawasaki SERVICE Manual, not just the Owners Manual.
If you can point out specific page/sections where they really mean just the Universal joint I will be more than willing to look at them too. The Propeller Shaft Joint refers to the end collar of the drive shaft by the Pinion Gear, NOT the Universal Joint end located by the Bevel Gear
here are my references
Section 1-8 GENERAL Information
refers you to Section 10-6 for the Propeller Shaft Joint Lubrication

Section 10-6 refers to Final Drive as well as Propeller Shaft Joint Lubrication, Final Gear Case Oil etc.
(Specifically 10-16 Final Drive) approximately page 189 in the PDF
Propeller Shaft Joint Lubrication
  • Remove the final gear case and propeller shaft
  • Wipe off the old grease from the propeller shaft sliding joint and pinion gear sliding joint
  • Pack the propeller shaft sliding joint with specified amount of a high temperature grease
  • Wipe the old grease off the front of the propeller shaft and from the driven shaft
  • Apply a thin coat of high temperature grease to the splines
The pinion gear is the large gear on the final drive side.
I should also point out that Universal Joint Inspection is also addressed seperately from the Propeller Joint Inspection.
Now excuse me, but if I can read the Service manual and look at the pictures and figure out what they are talking about, then a trained, certified mechanic should be able too also!
Also note, if you do not have a SERVICE MANUAL, get one. It's available online at TOC Manufacturing
http://www.tocmanufacturing.com/Products.htm
scroll down til you see
Link to VN700/750 Service Manual in PDF format (WARNING 117MEG file) click here
Right click on the "here" and do a save as​
 
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