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You didn't watch the videos?
I didn't watch the second one until just now. So, he's confirming that it's an absolutely terrible idea.

The Pros:
  • It's functional. (Well, that's good frickin' news...)
  • High mileage. (You putting as many miles on your bike in a year as your car?? Not me.)
  • Low temps. (It's 112 degrees out, let's go for a ride!)
  • Low Cost. (Sure, cheap is good. Buy a cheap helmet, I dare ya.)

The Cons:
  • "You're more likely to see spontaneous uninstallation." (Wait, WHAT? Oh yeah, it's NOT a bike tire!)
  • The handling is $hit. (As if riding a motorcycle weren't already unsafe enough. Let's take more unecessary risks!)
That contact with the road bit is important. So, yes, there's slightly more surface area of the tire in contact with the road during banking, but that contact is negated by the poor handling and inherent risk of that thing he said.... what was it? Oh yeah, SPONTANEOUS UNINSTALLATION!!!

This gets a big ***K THAT from me.
 

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Doesn't seem to be much of that happening, except on someone's whiteboard.

Riding, is a risky pastime. You're already trusting strangers to not run over you. How do you manage that risk?
I can certainly mitigate that risk more effectively on a bike that will maneuver properly when intended, and by ensuring that I take every measure of safety available to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Doesn't seem to be much of that happening, except on someone's whiteboard.
Agreed. It seems theory and practice differ here. In theory, the tire shouldn't stay on the rim. But if this were common, there wouldn't be so many people swearing by it.

If I were doing high milage tours on a regular basis, consisting of mostly straight roads, I'd probably do it. Especially on a larger bike. I'm not so much put off by the supposed higher risk, but the change in handling. I already get a decent amount of use out of Shinko 230s.
 

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Agreed. It seems theory and practice differ here. In theory, the tire shouldn't stay on the rim. But if this were common, there wouldn't be so many people swearing by it.

If I were doing high milage tours on a regular basis, consisting of mostly straight roads, I'd probably do it. Especially on a larger bike. I'm not so much put off by the supposed higher risk, but the change in handling. I already get a decent amount of use out of Shinko 230s.
I feel the same way, if I was on a heavier bike that I'd be less likely to toss around, I'd give it a try right away.
 

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For sidecar folks, Darkside is recommended. A friend just installed a 205 on his Valkyrie and loves it. I watched him corner and there's a lot of tread on the ground. But, a 6cyl Valkyrie with him on it, he's a big fella, munching straight interstate miles, is a good fit for him.
Can probably go darkside all around on a sidecar rig. I did see some bikes with a darkside front but didn't watch their videos.

Valkyrie is a brute, about the same rank as the Boss Hoss I saw with the darkside.

Those CanAm Spiders use a 205 or so up front and the rear is probably similar. But they don't lean.
 

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Can probably go darkside all around on a sidecar rig. I did see some bikes with a darkside front but didn't watch their videos.

Valkyrie is a brute, about the same rank as the Boss Hoss I saw with the darkside.

Those CanAm Spiders use a 205 or so up front and the rear is probably similar. But they don't lean.
Agree with the darkside sidecar comment, for sure. But don't most guys with auto tires on a sidecar bike have a rear car rim? That's my understanding of it, but I could be wrong.

RegardingCan-Am Spyders: If it has three wheels, it's not a bike. Sorry, but I'm a purist.
 

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I agree. The videos are very clear to me anyway. I have decided that when my bike needs a new tire next, it is going to be darkside. The only post that really indicates a true problem with the darkside is the insurance issue. However I do not think the rear tire of a bike gets called into question when the problem is vehicles running darkside tires are the ones causing the incidents themselves. Last weekend I was almost creamed by an idiot running a stop sign and turning in front of me. A few days before that my son was almost shoved off the road by a woman in a car making a lane change without "seeing" him. In both instances had we not been aware of the invisible nature of motorcycles I do not think the type of rear tire we have would really a a issue at a coroner's inquest.

Many of the handling concerns raised remind me of the questions back when we used to run tubes in ou tires.. Many riders did not trust tubless tires on bikes because they were afraid they would pop off the rim under hard turns (the peg dragging kind). That has really never been a issue but was a concern once upon a time.
 

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I agree. The videos are very clear to me anyway. I have decided that when my bike needs a new tire next, it is going to be darkside. The only post that really indicates a true problem with the darkside is the insurance issue. However I do not think the rear tire of a bike gets called into question when the problem is vehicles running darkside tires are the ones causing the incidents themselves. Last weekend I was almost creamed by an idiot running a stop sign and turning in front of me. A few days before that my son was almost shoved off the road by a woman in a car making a lane change without "seeing" him. In both instances had we not been aware of the invisible nature of motorcycles I do not think the type of rear tire we have would really a a issue at a coroner's inquest.

Many of the handling concerns raised remind me of the questions back when we used to run tubes in ou tires.. Many riders did not trust tubless tires on bikes because they were afraid they would pop off the rim under hard turns (the peg dragging kind). That has really never been a issue but was a concern once upon a time.
Aren't there some states that make the modification of some vehicles illegal? Like California, for instance?
 

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While there are a lot of rules about some modifications you can do to cars and pickups or trucks (especially cars built after 1975) I am not really sure about modifying a motorcycle. I do know there are laws regarding how much you can change the “rake” on a existing frame, although you can extend the forks way past what I would consider safe. I do not know if how the law applies to building a bike from scratch. I certainly would research everything if I were to build my own bike from the ground up.

Regarding tires, except for ones marked “not (legal) for street use” like drag racing slicks, I am unaware of any problems you might run into. Heck, even then the main problem might be getting someone to mount the tire after they sold it to you (if they knew you were putting them on a street bike and trying to ride it out of their store). California does not have any agency or rules requiring regular inspections for motorcycles so, unless you get a random law officer upset at you, most time no one even cares what you do to your bike.

California is odd regarding safety concerns, they make us wear a helmet but allow us to “cut” traffic lanes. No rules at all about how loud your bike can be as far as I can tell, either the exhaust or the horn. There are regulations about lighting for sure, especially colored lights. For the most part common sense will keep you out of trouble but some guys want their bike to be lit up like a Christmas tree. Red or blue lights visible in the front will get you stopped real fast.
 

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{REDACTED FOR CLARITY} For the most part common sense will keep you out of trouble but some guys want their bike to be lit up like a Christmas tree. Red or blue lights visible in the front will get you stopped real fast.
I'd love to purchase a decommissioned CHP motorcycle and cruise it around just to see how people react.

(And yes, I'm aware of that guy that kept impersonating motorcycle cops. What an idiot...)
 

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I'd love to purchase a decommissioned CHP motorcycle and cruise it around just to see how people react.

(And yes, I'm aware of that guy that kept impersonating motorcycle cops. What an idiot...)
There's a lot of those bikes in the auctions close to where you are. Honda, BMW, HD, and you might still catch a Kawi once in a while.
 
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