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1995 with 19k miles. Looks like factory exhaust before what would have been the GB. Blackout ears. Darkside tire on factory rim. Stock gauges. It looks like a LED light bar where the horns used to be. Owner wasn't around to talk to.
Great pics, too bad you didn't get a chance to talk to the owner.

That rear fender... I know I've seen that type of sheet at Lowe's, I'm guessing steel? Clever use of it. And those side cover bag things? Damn, that's original. Really did the cover.

I used to go to car shows with my old man, and do you know what he used to do? He carried a little memo pad and left notes on cars. I don't know what was on those notes.... probably asking if they were for sale or whatever. Next time, maybe take a memo pad and leave a note with the name of this site and an invitation to join us! We might could have picked his (or her?) brain!

Regardless, glad you grabbed these pics. Very inspiring!
 

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That's a car tire. He said he got it from Amazon. It's known as going to the Darkside. Some people swear by it, getting great lifespan out of such a tire. Others say it's dangerous. While I haven't tried it myself, I have heard it makes cornering I bit harder as the bike wants to stay upright....but not as hard as it might look. Many touring riders use them to eat up road miles. The real hard part is holding the bike upright when stopped on a non-level road!

The profile (155/80) is a bit smaller than the stock tire, with 124mm of height off the rim vs 135mm for the stock tire (150/90) or 136 for the commonly used oversized rear (170/80). Total diameter is 24.76" on this tire, 25.62" stock and 25.71" on the oversize. The smaller tire changes the final gear ratio slightly. The RPMs would go up about 150 at 60 mph.
Thanks! I suppose for long, straight stretches of road they'd be fine, but lots of curves? Doubt it.
 

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He even zipties the car tire to mount it.

But if the car tire saves $100 and lasts 4x as long, it's saving $400, or more.

That extra bit of counter steer is what made me stick with the mc tire. 6000 miles is good enough for me, on the mc tire, and I really want to try the Shinko 777 anyway.
However, saving $400 is still not worth the risk you're taking with a tire that ultimately has much less contact with the surface it's ridden upon. It does look kind of cool, but I've seen more automobile tires blow out than motorcycle tires.
Car tires get flats regularly. I've never had a flat on a motorcycle and I don't know anyone (personally, anyway) that's ever had a flat on a bike.

Think I'll also stick to the established norm.
 

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Except it has more contact, not less. I've had fewer flats on motorcycles, but drive 10x the miles with cars.
How does it get more contact when banking? When traveling in a straight line, of course a car tire is going to have more contact. But banking? I can't see how. Wouldn't you be riding on the outer edge of the car tire?

It seems like there's sort of an odd balance between mileage/cost/performance/safety to reckon with.
Fascinating topic all around, but I think I'm going to put my trust in a tire that's specifically designed for a motorcycle, and holy crap, I just realized something as I was writing this...

Could substituting a car tire for a motorcycle tire have some negative repercussions in the unfortunate event of an accident, especially from an insurance perspective?

I'd love to see some actual scientifically sound data that confirms or denies the safety of a car tire on a bike. If anyone knows of something like this, please share!
 

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Personally I just think it looks like a car tire on a bike, something in my head goes “nah”, but to each their own.
My only other thought is each is engineered for a specific function. I’d rather stick with what’s proven. You always hear “right tool for the job” in my head driving and riding are much different and need the right tools
100% agreed.
 

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You didn't watch the videos?
I didn't watch the second one until just now. So, he's confirming that it's an absolutely terrible idea.

The Pros:
  • It's functional. (Well, that's good frickin' news...)
  • High mileage. (You putting as many miles on your bike in a year as your car?? Not me.)
  • Low temps. (It's 112 degrees out, let's go for a ride!)
  • Low Cost. (Sure, cheap is good. Buy a cheap helmet, I dare ya.)

The Cons:
  • "You're more likely to see spontaneous uninstallation." (Wait, WHAT? Oh yeah, it's NOT a bike tire!)
  • The handling is $hit. (As if riding a motorcycle weren't already unsafe enough. Let's take more unecessary risks!)
That contact with the road bit is important. So, yes, there's slightly more surface area of the tire in contact with the road during banking, but that contact is negated by the poor handling and inherent risk of that thing he said.... what was it? Oh yeah, SPONTANEOUS UNINSTALLATION!!!

This gets a big ***K THAT from me.
 

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Doesn't seem to be much of that happening, except on someone's whiteboard.

Riding, is a risky pastime. You're already trusting strangers to not run over you. How do you manage that risk?
I can certainly mitigate that risk more effectively on a bike that will maneuver properly when intended, and by ensuring that I take every measure of safety available to me.
 

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You can spend $300 on a single Continental mc tire, and they're known to unwind at highway speed.
I wouldn't spend $300 on a single Contintental tire in the first place, ESPECIALLY if they're known to unwind at highway speed. You see? It's information like this that I make note of.
 

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Can probably go darkside all around on a sidecar rig. I did see some bikes with a darkside front but didn't watch their videos.

Valkyrie is a brute, about the same rank as the Boss Hoss I saw with the darkside.

Those CanAm Spiders use a 205 or so up front and the rear is probably similar. But they don't lean.
Agree with the darkside sidecar comment, for sure. But don't most guys with auto tires on a sidecar bike have a rear car rim? That's my understanding of it, but I could be wrong.

RegardingCan-Am Spyders: If it has three wheels, it's not a bike. Sorry, but I'm a purist.
 
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