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Discussion Starter #1
In the middle of this complete overhaul on my '85 VN700 atm..and it's been good and bad so far..but mostly just a few cranky, rusty parts. However there have been a few "specialty" tools along the way that have really, really helped. In the pic below, the bottom tool is the Kawasaki #57001-1100 Stem Nut Wrench. This just works awesomely and not a scratch on the nuts at all! Much better than a screwdriver/hammer. The next tool up is the MotionPro 18mm spark plug socket. It's really nice and fits easily in the deep plug holes.

Speaking of the spark plug holes...I'm in the process of removing the cylinders and I have to remove those spark plug sleeves. I looked up the "tool" for that Kawasaki #57001-1210. Bike Bandit wanted $14 for it..plus shipping and time of course. I read in Clymer's where you could just use a 27mm nut and wrench to remove it, so I thought that would be much easier...not! I live in a very small town and metric is kinda foreign around here..and a huge 27mm nut was not to be had after searching in 2 counties...LOL! I was able to locate a 27mm socket(in picture) though with ease at Autozone. I had a brainstorm though...have a buddy at the local vocational school that runs the machine shop. I went by there this morning and he made the "tool" on the top left for me on the CNC machine. It's matched perfectly to the spark plug sleeve and I just slide on the 27mm socket and off the sleeves came no problem!! Best part is not only is he a Harley guy...lol..but he wouldn't even take a dime for it...so got the tool for free basically...the socket was $8...so still cheaper and custom-made while I waited...LOL!

I'm a firm believer in the having the right tool for the job...:)

 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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See not all Harley guy are bad...lol...:beerchug:...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Good looking set of specialty tools.

For those without a machinist buddy nearby, a 1 1/16" nut should work in place of a 27mm nut to remove the spark plug tube.
1 1/16" X 25.4mm/inch= 26.9875mm.
I had an old 1 1/8" nut (28.575mm) in my junk drawer. It took me less than 10 minutes to file it down to fit the hex receptacle in the plug tube.
 

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Cool tools are nice but I fix a lot of stuff in spite of my tools instead of because of them.

A hammer is our friend.A brass drift or punch and a hammer would work fine on the spanner nuts and not damage them.Or if you just have to have a spanner wrench,which is a useful tool ,one from harbor freight is considerably less expensive than any tool that you buy from a dealership.:smiley_th
 

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Daily rider
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After about 5/8" most american and metric sizes are so close they're practically interchangeable. The larger the nut, the more meat either socket will grab.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I realize I probably spent too much money on the tools..but it was partially peace of mind and partially just online ordering convenience. I really try and get most things here locally if possible, because otherwise it's a trip out of town..usually a 3-5hr round trip ordeal. Lots of gas and time wasted and sometimes they have what I need and sometimes I get there..it's wrong and still have to order online anyway. I searched all morning and the biggest nut I could find locally was 20mm. I really love living in a small town most of the time, but it does have it's challenges..some days I really miss being in a big city..it would make this project so much easier..but then again if I were in the big city I wouldn't have my own shop on 2 acres of land either...LOL! Was simply sharing my "indulgences"...:)
 

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Daily rider
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Was simply sharing my "indulgences"...:)
Always enjoy your updates, Wolf. Not too many people who are so detailed with their progress. I guess most of us are just in a hurry to get the job done and going again. Your updates will prove to be highly informative for future members of this site.
 

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I realize I probably spent too much money on the tools..but it was partially peace of mind and partially just online ordering convenience. I really try and get most things here locally if possible, because otherwise it's a trip out of town..usually a 3-5hr round trip ordeal. Lots of gas and time wasted and sometimes they have what I need and sometimes I get there..it's wrong and still have to order online anyway. I searched all morning and the biggest nut I could find locally was 20mm. I really love living in a small town most of the time, but it does have it's challenges..some days I really miss being in a big city..it would make this project so much easier..but then again if I were in the big city I wouldn't have my own shop on 2 acres of land either...LOL! Was simply sharing my "indulgences"...:)
Inez Ky.Pop.600,Not exactly a metropolis here either!I have paid more for things because of online convenience too, when in no hurry.Man toys,we all got'em, And a hearty Amen on the small towns.
 

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That's cool, I always envy people with machinist or fabricator buddies. I'd love to learn how to fabricate and just make metal do what I want. I have had this idea for a bike for about a year now and want to build it so bad. It's ALL fabrication though and I just don't know how to get it done. This bike would be one seriously gnarly beast too...
 

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Daily rider
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And a hearty Amen on the small towns.
Absolutely! I grew up near a small town in Northern WI, and have moved back to a small town in Northern MI. There's a Home Depot within 50 miles, a Menards within 60 miles (upper Midwest hardware and lumber chain owned by the John Menard family), and you can get anything online.
 

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That Motion Pro spark plug socket is pretty cool. Luckily one of my riding buddies also has a VN700 (part of the reason I got one), so he let me borrow his socket. I've been looking for one of my own, but haven't had much luck locally and I was worried about buying one online that I couldn't be sure would fit (not thin enough, too short, etc.).

http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/partno/08-0175 is the product page for the Motion Pro. It's handy that it can be driven so many different ways, especially if you keep it on the bike and get stuck doing a repair somewhere without your full set of tools.
 
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