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Discussion Starter #1
I just got my Vulcan in the spring. Up here in Maine, the cold weather gets here early. I would love to ride till the snow flies, but have found that my bike does not like to stay running on cold mornings.

I let it idle for a few minutes (5-10) in the a.m. at around 3000-3500 rpms to warm up, I then drop it down to around 1100 (normal idle) and as soon as i start to release the clutch the tac shoots up to around 5000 and then dies.

I can get it going while it is still around 3000 put it puts a lot of tourqe on the drive train.

Questions - Is this normal cold weather actions for this bike? Am I hurting the drive train when I start out like this? Any suggestions for cold weather riders?

Thanks for you input.
 

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Definitely not normal. I've ridden my 750 from 100+ degrees down to 22 degrees and never had the bike act any different no matter what the temp. When it was cold, I started the bike with the choke on full and let it idle, and as it warms up and the idle starts climbing past 1500 to 1700 or so, I keep easing off the choke, keeping it at around 1500 til it has warmed for around a minute or so, then roll off the choke completely and it idles normal and I'm ready to go. I have read where some members here started riding with the choke still on, but I've never had to do that. Letting out the clutch and having the rpms jump to 5000 rpms is not a good thing and will eventually cook your clutch plates. When its not cold how does your bike act?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Definitely not normal. I've ridden my 750 from 100+ degrees down to 22 degrees and never had the bike act any different no matter what the temp. When it was cold, I started the bike with the choke on full and let it idle, and as it warms up and the idle starts climbing past 1500 to 1700 or so, I keep easing off the choke, keeping it at around 1500 til it has warmed for around a minute or so, then roll off the choke completely and it idles normal and I'm ready to go. I have read where some members here started riding with the choke still on, but I've never had to do that. Letting out the clutch and having the rpms jump to 5000 rpms is not a good thing and will eventually cook your clutch plates. When its not cold how does your bike act?
when not cold........runs like a champ.

dont misunderstand though, the NEEDLE just spikes at 5k when it stalls during the cold morn, its real quick needle movement only, the engine doesnt ramp up (to the best of my recall as far back as this morning) perhaps im just not letting it warm up long enough (basically however long it takes to have a smoke). But the needle movement wasnt the question. (please pardon, I express myself poorly in the written word).

Basically, is stalling on cold mornings common? How long do other northerners have to warm it up on cold mornings? (it sits outside all nite, no garage storage).
 

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My first questions are what kind of oil are you using and when was the last change?

If it will idle at for a few minutes by itself at 1100 rpms, the motor should be warm and ready to go......

so my thinking is there is a problem with the clutch. You really should not let the bike run at 3500 rpms when it is warming up...I always follow the same proceedure fergy mentioned where I slowly back the choke lever down until it will run with it completely off...not letting the rpms go past 2500 at the most.

Thick oils or bad oil can effect the clutch plates in cold weather, as even though the motor is warmed up..the oil is not as warm as it will get, and the clutch is still basicly cold.

Fresh light oil is a good start, go with a motorcycle specific 10w40 and a new filter. When you warm the bike up, use the choke (which is really a fuel enrichment circuit) in increments from full open to full closed to keep the rpms in the 1500 to 2000 range if you can. While doing this squeeze in and release the clutch lever several (like 20) times to get the warmeer oil on the plates and to warm the plates up themselves.

If you still are having problems after doing this , I would be surprised, but report back.


KM
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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What Fergy & KM said, I did run 5w-40 Shell Rotella T Syn. in mine the year around, that 5w might help you in the cold or north...
I would'nt let mine get over 2K with the choke, really liked 1,500 the best, 1,100 rpm warm idle, and as KM said squeeze that clutch lever in and out several times to get it working better in the cold...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks guys. the oil was just changed about 600 miles ago so that should be good. but I never thought about the clutch thing. I'll try that out over the next freaking 9 months its winter up here! (sry, winters up here are looong)

Anyhoo... yeah, i'll try the clutch and give my report back later. Peace.
 

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Wth the "spiking" of the tach needle it sounds like a safety switch may be getting stuck when it gets cold out.
You may also try spray lubing the safety switches... clutch, kickstand..

Also agree with the 5w-40 Rotella Synth for your neck of the woods!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your input. The culprit turned out to be........... The clutch sensor switch was failing. Disconnected the switch and all is well with the world again. Of course, now I have to make sure that I dont start the bike in gear without the clutch depressed, but thats never been a problem before.

Yay, now I can ride the last couple weeks of riding weather up here!
 
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