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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After spending the afternoon with the bike, my ohm meter, soldering gun and torch and an assortment of wire, Feel I have a feel for the system. From my viewpoint some faulty connectors and the ignition switch seem to be a huge issue with these. Did the coil mod but with a twist, redid the main power supply to the fuse box, doing away with the bullet connector, and soldering the wire directly. Checked the fuse box and her connections all check well, So wired it up using the auxillirary power supply fuse { this fuse is 12 volt hot at all times}. to power the coils through the coil relay mod. As not to have all kinds of inline fuses floating all over the place. Built a new battery strap hold down, and a relay mount that bolts off of it, The harness on my relay connector has a bolt hole and tab in it instead of the relay,so you just pop out the relay should it need replaced. Definitly could tell a difference in the way it ran immediately, which tells me the power wire out of the ignition switch def has issues, but works fine for closing relay contacts. removed all the emission garbage, cleaned up the front side of the battery box by doing it.
New regulator harness from ricks stator came in so went after that, removed the complete stator harness from the main harness, {wanted to see where the wire from the stator that runs the headlight connects}. Cut off the harness a few inches from the stator, and rewired the stator harness directly to the new harness soldering each connection,{ricks comes with a heavier guage wire that's plenty long to reach back over to the stator} then reattached the yellow lead which runs the headlights. Installed a 12 gauge wire from the connector where the white wire would normally be, to a 30 amp fuse and an eyelet to attach to the positive battery connection. ran a 12 gauge wire from the black wire cavity to the neg side of the New battery directly. Then attached the brown lead to the middle between the two after verifying it was battery voltage with key on. Insuring charging to battery is direct with no loose ends, then retaped the entire harness with improvements with 3 m electrical tape. Will continue to monitor to make sure she's not losing voltage there, but would think would notice if the tail lights had an issue dimming. Now waiting for the regulator to make it so I can plug it in and see how it works. Stator tested fine, but hadn't been able to run it long enough to get it hot.

Fork seals replaced, brake fluid flushed and mc cleaned out, Radiator is cleaned and flushed out as well.
My thought process on the engineers on this bike, Why in the heck did they put the removable engine cradle frame on the clutch side when it really isn't needed to replace the clutch, would have been nice to design it for the left side and make the right side solid {idiots} Its a 20 something year old bike but has promise. carbs all cleaned along with tank and petcock gone through. carbs adjusted and synced. Heading towards the driveshaft splines later in the weak, bike only has 5300 miles on it so hoping its fine, If not mistaken remember someone saying the later years had the issues moreso.
Not hearing much timing chain noise, but plans for switching to the manual adjuster soon. Not going to relocate the regulator simply because the bike has vance and hines slipons on it and no belly pan exhaust so heat shouldn't be an issue, although did drill out the nuts from battery box and will be installing bolts with a nut on the regulator assy so I can just stick it through the bottom and put nuts on it for ease of replacement, probably looking to switch to the mosfet design in the near future as well. wireings pretty much set up to change it now. that should get her back in top condition and add a little trustworthiness to it so I feel safe knowing my son should be trouble free on the rides with us.
 

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Hope you took some pix documenting these improvements. Sounds like you've been pretty busy, in a good way.
 

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After spending the afternoon with the bike, my ohm meter, soldering gun and torch and an assortment of wire, Feel I have a feel for the system. From my viewpoint some faulty connectors and the ignition switch seem to be a huge issue with these. Did the coil mod but with a twist, redid the main power supply to the fuse box, doing away with the bullet connector, and soldering the wire directly. Checked the fuse box and her connections all check well, So wired it up using the auxillirary power supply fuse { this fuse is 12 volt hot at all times}. to power the coils through the coil relay mod. As not to have all kinds of inline fuses floating all over the place. Built a new battery strap hold down, and a relay mount that bolts off of it, The harness on my relay connector has a bolt hole and tab in it instead of the relay,so you just pop out the relay should it need replaced. Definitly could tell a difference in the way it ran immediately, which tells me the power wire out of the ignition switch def has issues, but works fine for closing relay contacts. removed all the emission garbage, cleaned up the front side of the battery box by doing it.
New regulator harness from ricks stator came in so went after that, removed the complete stator harness from the main harness, {wanted to see where the wire from the stator that runs the headlight connects}. Cut off the harness a few inches from the stator, and rewired the stator harness directly to the new harness soldering each connection,{ricks comes with a heavier guage wire that's plenty long to reach back over to the stator} then reattached the yellow lead which runs the headlights. Installed a 12 gauge wire from the connector where the white wire would normally be, to a 30 amp fuse and an eyelet to attach to the positive battery connection. ran a 12 gauge wire from the black wire cavity to the neg side of the New battery directly. Then attached the brown lead to the middle between the two after verifying it was battery voltage with key on. Insuring charging to battery is direct with no loose ends, then retaped the entire harness with improvements with 3 m electrical tape. Will continue to monitor to make sure she's not losing voltage there, but would think would notice if the tail lights had an issue dimming. Now waiting for the regulator to make it so I can plug it in and see how it works. Stator tested fine, but hadn't been able to run it long enough to get it hot.

Fork seals replaced, brake fluid flushed and mc cleaned out, Radiator is cleaned and flushed out as well.
My thought process on the engineers on this bike, Why in the heck did they put the removable engine cradle frame on the clutch side when it really isn't needed to replace the clutch, would have been nice to design it for the left side and make the right side solid {idiots} Its a 20 something year old bike but has promise. carbs all cleaned along with tank and petcock gone through. carbs adjusted and synced. Heading towards the driveshaft splines later in the weak, bike only has 5300 miles on it so hoping its fine, If not mistaken remember someone saying the later years had the issues moreso.
Not hearing much timing chain noise, but plans for switching to the manual adjuster soon. Not going to relocate the regulator simply because the bike has vance and hines slipons on it and no belly pan exhaust so heat shouldn't be an issue, although did drill out the nuts from battery box and will be installing bolts with a nut on the regulator assy so I can just stick it through the bottom and put nuts on it for ease of replacement, probably looking to switch to the mosfet design in the near future as well. wireings pretty much set up to change it now. that should get her back in top condition and add a little trustworthiness to it so I feel safe knowing my son should be trouble free on the rides with us.
So.........that's all you did?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
well built new stainless coasters too lol.. Makes me appreciate my stratoliner that much more, start I and just ride it lol.
 

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The problem with all motorcycle charging systems (except the '88 and up Goldwing) is in the basic design. On a car, the alternator only puts out current when a load is placed on it. The more of a load that is placed on it, the more it puts out, up to it's limit.

A motorcycle charging system is completely different. The stators output is not controlled by load. The stator runs at full output all the time, at much above idle, and much of the time produces more current than is actually needed by the bike. So what happens to this "extra" current? Believe it or not, it is directly shorted to ground by the R/R. In other words, it is dissipated by the R/R as heat, by a resistance element in the R/R. That's why the R/R gets warm. It's burning off excess current by resistance, just like an electric range burner. Since there is not usually that much current to get rid of, the R/R does not usually get that hot. But as the R/R gets older, it's internal resistance gets higher. And it gets warmer, until it finally burns up altogether, and you have an open circuit, and uncontrolled output from the stator.

This could very well be at least part of the cause of early stator failure. As the internal resistance of the R/R goes up, so does the heat. And this goes back to the 3 yellow wires and to the stator. Basically there is so much resistance it is like shorting the stator out.

I found this problem on a 1200 Goldwing. When I got it, there were 3 plastic Molex connectors in the yellow wires from the stator to the R/R, and they were all burned (most likely high resistance at the connectors) I got some new 12 gauge wire, and ran all 3 new wires from the stator output to the R/R. I hardwired everything. No more connectors. The R/R was still getting super hot (to hot to touch without getting burned), and my new wires were also getting hot, to the point where the insulation was getting very soft. I replaced the R/R. Still had the same problem. one of the wires from the stator to the R/R actually caught on fire once, fortunately I was working on it with the fairing off, and quickly put it out. The wire actually got hot enough to set the insulation on fire. I rewired it with 8 gauge wire. Of coarse the yellow stator wire coming out of the engine and the R/R was still 12 gauge. R/R still ran red hot. I ran extra grounds to it. No difference. I finally rigged up a high output blower type 12V fan under the fake plastic tank, and fabricated some ductwork so that it blew a lot of air directly on the R/R. That lowered the temperature of the R/R by over 120 degrees, and the wires quit melting. I rode it several thousand miles that way, it is now parked in my back yard with some other problems. These bikes have 500 watt stators. Most of them have been converted to automotive style alternators, driven off the front of the crankshaft where the timing belts are.

The Vulcan 750 has exactly the same system, just a lower output stator and less excess current to get rid of. An electrical engineer (who did not have all the Honda specs) suspected that the Goldwing R/R simply lacked the capacity to deal with that much current, and that a larger capacity R/R would solve the problem. I found the 3 connectors in the stator to R/R wires burned on my Vulcan 750 burned. I cut them out and hardwired them, but I have noticed the insulation on the wires has hardened from heat. Maybe time to replace the R/R before the stator goes.
 
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